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Tale Of Woe: This Lamborghini Owner Has Started A Blog To Document His Experience With A Shop – Ugliness Abounds


Tale Of Woe: This Lamborghini Owner Has Started A Blog To Document His Experience With A Shop – Ugliness Abounds

Listen, I understand that Lamborghinis are built in factories like all other cars, but we see a mental picture of those factories as being filled with skilled craftsmen who are lovingly building these cars which have been engineered to within an inch of their lives and openly weeping when each one drives away. They are Italian, after all. Between the carrying on and the hand gesturing…but I digress. The point I am getting at is that it just seems¬†sacrilegious to go monkeying around with what they created. Listen, I know that lots of these things get hot rodded and I am sure that most of them run like stink and will until the end of time. This one didn’t and the story of how the guy’s whole ownership went down like the Titanic is both maddening and incredible to read.

I am not a blame the victim guy, at least I try not to be. The dude writing this blog got taken to the cleaners by a shop that (if his description of events is accurate) made significant and catastrophic mistakes with a frequency and on a level that can hardly be believed. Honestly, you will read this blog like I did and think, “WHAT?! REALLY?!” at more than one point. There comes a time when reading this account that maybe you’ll have the same mental shift as I did and start yelling at the computer, “WHY DID YOU BRING YOUR CAR BACK THERE? WHAT ARE YOU DOING?!” I actually did that loud enough to have my wife ask me if everything was OK in my office. Obviously, there is a trust element in all of this stuff. There’s a trust element in every part of your life. You go to sleep and trust that your wife isn’t going to bury a butcher cleaver between your eyes. You go to pump gas and trust that you won’t suffer a fiery death at pump number 7, and this guy trusted the shop that was wrenching on his car would not render it an exploding, leaking, disaster of an Italian exotic.

You’ll read this and draw your own conclusions but we know one thing. For what that dude has spent on the car (which we think isn’t working at this point) over the last few years, you’d have been able to buy several of your favorite muscle cars in great shape. Money is money and we don’t get hung up on that. A dude spending $140,000 if he has it is like us spending $100 if we have it. That part of the deal is scalable. It is the string of mechanical failures out of this now bastardized Lamborghini that will leave you speechless. It did for me (after I stopped screaming).

CLICK THE BUTTON BELOW TO READ THE FULL STORY ON THIS DUDE’S “ADVENTURE” WITH HIS LAMBORGHINI -¬†

CLICK HERE to check out the guy's blog and his long history with the shop that was adding the twin turbos to his car

lambo1 lambo2


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9 thoughts on “Tale Of Woe: This Lamborghini Owner Has Started A Blog To Document His Experience With A Shop – Ugliness Abounds

  1. C Royer

    what a crazy tale of a guy willing to spend what it takes to have the car he wants and not getting it—sad

    Reply
  2. Gary Smrtic

    I’ve seen this time and again with “Tuner” shops. While not the only one, a certain well known Viper tuner shop in Houston was the worse, by a long margin. Yet people still use them. It amazes me.

    Reply
  3. orange65

    I would be cautious using a company that markets it upgrades by “stage 1, stage 2, etc.”. That is marketing toward the gamer crowd for sure.

    This guy got screwed for sure. I would certainly see if the engine he got back is the one that came with the car. Is the VIN on the block?

    There are car guys and there are car lovers. Car guys know their cars mechanically as well as the statistics- and do a lot of the work themselves. This guy is a car lover- doesn’t really care about the mechanics as long as it goes and looks like he wants. These are the guys shops like this pray on.

    Reply
  4. Matt Cramer

    I have to disagree on the premise that Italian exotics shouldn’t be hot rodded; many of them are long on artistry but fail to back that up with engineering on the same level. I’ve heard of a lot of cases of Italian cars with aerodynamics that would lift the front end too much before reaching their claimed top speed, brakes that would overheat after one lap around a race track, etc. When an Italian exotic fails to live up to its reputation, I can fully understand why an owner would want that corrected. Or more power put into one.

    I definitely feel bad for the owner there. The wiring pictures were pretty interesting. Sadly, I’ve seen worse wiring jobs.

    Reply
  5. Rik in Malta

    Holy crap! A couple of things puzzle me though; 1) having driven a stock Gallardo, never did I think “hmm, if only this thing had more power…”, and 2) why would you (seemingly) pick a tuner who you’re going to be spending a significant chunk of money with (notwithstanding all the other bollocks he ultimately experienced) for your *expensive* Italo-Germanic supercar, without speaking with some other owners first for testimonials,etc.?

    Could it possibly be because the owner has more money than sense?

    P.S. Before anyone suggests that the “mere” ~550ish bhp it comes with is inadequate, I’d also point out that the Gallardo was not built for drag-racing. If you want a car that’s quick in a straight line, build one, preferably around a good, solid big-arse V8.

    Reply
  6. Cyclone03

    Having worked in a shop with a mechanic that if he needed a part to fix the car he was working on he would just borrow it from that car over there and have the boss order a new one for that car I can see how this happened. The owner was not planning any kind of scam but pretty soon parts end up missing, including whole engines it seems.
    “We” had two long term projects in the shop when I started there. The first was an underhood fire that had progressed to “burnt stuff removed” then stopped. I spent about 2 weeks putting it all right. The other was a 460 swap into an 89 Mustang GT. I got the old engine out,new in. Went home on Friday came in Monday and the rear end was out and getting bolted into another car. Boss “talked the owner into a 9inch”. I waited 2 months for it to come in and when I got back to the car the interior was out for a cage install. I soon left , but remain friends with all there. 3 years after I left the car was parted out never ran with the 460.

    The “tuner” killed that Lambo looking for a “number” on the dyno.

    Reply
  7. Steven Long

    Having read the Billy’s blog, and Taylors response. I can’t help but place blame on both parties. As a builder, you automatically know that manufacturers only design the driveline to handle the intended amount of power that the engine can produce. So when you more than double the horsepower of the engine, you know driveline upgrades are the order of the day. This car was putting out more than double the original BHP rating of the engine at the wheels. If a man asked me to increase the engine output to that level, I would never even take the job unless he agreed to the necessary driveline upgrades. This engine upgrade is the equivalent of pulling a V6 out of a new Camaro, and dropping in an LS7 with the 6 cylinder driveline still in place. How long would you expect that combination to last? You have to use a little common sense when you do any performance upgrades to any car. Rotating mass is always kept to a minimum during the manufacturing process. Think before you go and install a turbo on your bone stock car. Actions do have consequences!

    Reply

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