Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Can Racing Go Green?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Can Racing Go Green?

    http://www.bangshift.com/blog/Can-Racing-Go-Green.html

  • #2
    Re: Can Racing Go Green?

    if you thought efi was too much money ??

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Can Racing Go Green?

      the H_MB DRAGS are starting to look better and better

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Can Racing Go Green?

        Some "greening" of motorsports is inevitable unless there is a huge change in organizational leadership and public perceptions.

        Bangshifters are, sadly, in the minority. Motorsports will be somewhat subject to the trends and values adopted by the "appliance motorist" majority. We may not like it, but that's how it is.

        However, the expectation that large grandstands would be packed with viewers for virtually silent electric vehicle racing is misplaced.

        While there will always be spectators for nearly any kind of racing (horse racing and track and field are quiet sports), much of the attractiveness of current motorsports is in the sounds and smells of the spectacle.

        Racing what you sell should always be a goal of factory-backed motorsports, regardless of whether it appeals to casual fans or hidebound traditionalists.

        Why?

        Because it promotes technological transfers, engineering discipline, organizational loyalty, and rapid advancements in materials, techniques and systems. It also attracts knowledgeable and discriminating customers.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Can Racing Go Green?

          For any kind of racing to be "green", you'd have to not-have the part where tens of thousands of people get into their carbon-spewing SUVs and spend three hours driving and another hour sitting in traffic to go see it. Imagine how much fuel gets used, total, when a live racing event happens. It's the same as with music concerts by artists who promote themselves as environmentalists. People aren't exactly going to the show on bicycles.:D
          ...

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Can Racing Go Green?

            Spectating is NOT part of racing.
            You are comparing apples and oranges.
            Act your age, not your shoe size. - Prince

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Can Racing Go Green?

              The racing business is essentially an entertainment business and cars on the track and butts in the stands are inextricably linked. Even a TV show needs a live audience first.
              ...

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Can Racing Go Green?

                So I guess an F1 race in Turkey might be green but one at Silverstone is not. ??

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Can Racing Go Green?

                  None of it's "green". Some ways just cause less fuel to be used.

                  I'm just pointing out an irony here, guys...I didn't come on to preach, and I'm all for new tech. ;) ;) It's just that usually when I see the word "green" these days, a little "red" light comes on.
                  ...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Can Racing Go Green?

                    Originally posted by Loren
                    None of it's "green". Some ways just cause less fuel to be used.

                    I'm just pointing out an irony here, guys...I didn't come on to preach, and I'm all for new tech. ;) ;) It's just that usually when I see the word "green" these days, a little "red" light comes on.
                    You are a wise man.

                    I work in the homebuilding industry and we are now being legislated into "green" homebuilding practices. Two "green" practice bodies Leed and Build it Green are getting local and state agencies to create regulations that require us to use Leed and "BIG" to certify that we are green. So far the only green I'm seeing is the money going into their pockets. I've got to hire one of their franchisee certifiers to rate my project and then it has to go to another franchisee for peer review.

                    I had the occasion to run around the golf course with one of the top dogs of one of the organizations, he stated that he was adding on to his house, we asked if he was complying with the top rating of his firm, he told it was too expensive and he wanted more square footage.

                    Always follow the money.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Can Racing Go Green?

                      Originally posted by Loren
                      The racing business is essentially an entertainment business and cars on the track and butts in the stands are inextricably linked. Even a TV show needs a live audience first.
                      You're right insofar as big-time racing is now a "business."

                      But the "business" aspects of grassroots racing are more concerned with extracting payments from the participants and returning a fraction of that in prizes. "[B ]utts in the stands" have little to do with a lot of the racing "business" below the top professional levels. Moreover, as some local dirt track and drag strip operators could tell you, the break-even point for sportsman competition is probably lower than some of us think.

                      The pressure for "green" symbolism, incremental improvement, and window-dressing in motorsports will come from the top down (e.g. US EPA, state governments, F.I.A., auto manufacturers, corporate sponsors)

                      Originally posted by Loren
                      None of it's "green". Some ways just cause less fuel to be used.

                      I'm just pointing out an irony here, guys...I didn't come on to preach, and I'm all for new tech. ;) ;) It's just that usually when I see the word "green" these days, a little "red" light comes on.
                      A red light should come on. Lowering carbon emissions is, in the minds of the pragmatic greens, comparatively "green."

                      Moreover, the pragmatics are willing to tolerate the temporary "waste" of spectator sports when the alternative is more decentralized carbon emissions (e.g. 180,000 people sitting for hours in traffic twice a year at Talladega is a whole lot more pragmatically "green" than 25,000 new dirt track racers, sportsman drag racers, or hot rodders -- the assumption being that allowing people to live vicariously through sports "heros" uses up resources that might be otherwise employed in more energy-intensive participation).

                      As compared to the "stick and ball" sports, aggregate energy usage (including transportation of spectators) is probably still far above the "carbon cost" of motorsports, simply because "stick and ball" sports are so much more pervasive.

                      Of course, somebody will eventually try to add a "carbon tax" to the ticket prices for mass sporting events and/or sporting event parking.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Can Racing Go Green?

                        just a bunch of hidden tax bull
                        seems like some here want even more government intrusion in our lives

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Can Racing Go Green?

                          Recognizing that it's a possibility is not the same as supporting it. Hopefully without violating the "no politics" rule, I can assure you that I'm categorically against all "carbon taxes."

                          Corporations and politicians are a huge target for environmental activists. To assume that either of these targets will be more responsive to us Bangshifters than to the well-funded and highly-organized environmental lobby is naive.

                          I don't like that, but that's reality.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Can Racing Go Green?

                            the radical enviromentalists are in charge of the government and courts
                            it is kind of hopeless
                            and it all started with the ban on cigarette advertising

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Can Racing Go Green?

                              It started a long time before that.

                              Starting with National Labor Relations Board v. Jones and Laughlin Steel Corporation in 1937, the Court not only rejected the whole battery of narrow commerce formulas (a process it extended in United States v. Darby Lumber Company [1941]) but also validated the clause as the principal constitutional base for later New Deal programs, authorizing broad federal control of labor relations, wages and hours, agriculture, business, and navigable streams. In 1946, Justice Frank Murphy stated: "The federal commerce power is as broad as the economic needs of the nation" (North American Company v. Securities and Exchange Commission).
                              http://www.answers.com/topic/commerce-clause

                              In 1934 the Supreme Court decided Nebbia v. New York stating that there is no constitutionally protected fundamental right to freedom of contract. In 1937, the Supreme Court decided West Coast Hotel Co. v. Parrish, which expressly overruled Adkins and implicitly signaled the end of the Lochner era. The decision repudiated the idea that freedom of contract should be unrestricted

                              * * * *
                              . The Court sounded the death knell for economic substantive due process several years later in Williamson v. Lee Optical of Oklahoma (1955). In that case, a unanimous Supreme Court declared: "The day is gone when this Court uses the Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment to strike down state laws, regulatory of business and industrial conditions, because they may be unwise, improvident, or out of harmony with a particular school of thought."
                              http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lochner_v._New_York

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X