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Watch this guy build the biggest bench vise ever!

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  • Watch this guy build the biggest bench vise ever!

    GIANT VISE BUILT IN 10 MINUTES - YouTube

    This guy is awesome, and I want that vise!
    Act your age, not your shoe size. - Prince

  • #2
    Agreed /\/\/\ !
    Ed, Mary, & 'Earl'
    HRPT LongHaulers, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12, 13, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19.


    Inside every old person is a young person wondering, "what the hell happened?"

    The man at the top of the mountain didn't fall there. -Vince Lombardi

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    • #3
      Pretty amazing! But it took several $millions of equipment to make it - I'm just jealous.

      Dan

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      • #4
        https://bangshift.com/general-news/v...ireball-tools/

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        • #5
          I'm seriously impressed. This guy's shop skills are master class level. PLUS - he owns and knows how to use a SHAPER. These machines predate milling machines, and can make a shaving the size of a 2 by 4 (kidding), but it's incredible to watch. That shaper was probably over a hundred years old and it STILL WORKS LIKE A CHARM. I was a tool & die maker for 40 years, and I've never even seen one in person. Only the old timers knew how to run one. And I love his radial arm drill. I used to operate a 10 foot tall one when I worked at Beechcraft in the tool shop. Makes a drill motor look like a child's toy.
          Act your age, not your shoe size. - Prince

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          • #6
            And after all, we all have our vices.

            Dan

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            • #7
              Originally posted by studemax View Post
              This guy's shop skills are master class level.
              Mighty darned good at video production too, or somebody sure is.

              Charter member of the Turd Nuggets

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              • #8
                Originally posted by studemax View Post
                I'm seriously impressed. This guy's shop skills are master class level. PLUS - he owns and knows how to use a SHAPER. These machines predate milling machines, and can make a shaving the size of a 2 by 4 (kidding), but it's incredible to watch. That shaper was probably over a hundred years old and it STILL WORKS LIKE A CHARM. I was a tool & die maker for 40 years, and I've never even seen one in person. Only the old timers knew how to run one. And I love his radial arm drill. I used to operate a 10 foot tall one when I worked at Beechcraft in the tool shop. Makes a drill motor look like a child's toy.
                That shaping machine raised an eyebrow over here too. One of the first machine shops I worked at had pre/post war machinery and the shop is still around 25yrs later using the same stuff. The owner taught me how to make tools for and run Peerless shapers, and power hacksaws, pre-war Acme Girdleys, Brown & Sharpes, Cincinnati mills, Warner & Swasey turret lathes, Monarch engine lathes etc... The basement of the shop had an early 1900's Fairbanks Morse hit skip motor powered generator that ran the shop when power went out, and belt driven machinery from the late 1800's early 1900's that was still in use. There is a forge house out back with a 1919 Bullard vertical turret lathe. The shop made a lot of new and refurbished parts for steam engines and did job shop work to keep the bills paid.

                It's good too see companies like Fireball Tools still using the old tech that built this nation into a manufacturing powerhouse that it used to be...

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by DanStokes View Post
                  And after all, we all have our vices.

                  Dan
                  Biggest bench habit?
                  Flying south, with a flock of bird dogs.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    That shaping machine raised an eyebrow over here too. One of the first machine shops I worked at had pre/post war machinery and the shop is still around 25yrs later using the same stuff. The owner taught me how to make tools for and run Peerless shapers, and power hacksaws, pre-war Acme Girdleys, Brown & Sharpes, Cincinnati mills, Warner & Swasey turret lathes, Monarch engine lathes etc... The basement of the shop had an early 1900's Fairbanks Morse hit skip motor powered generator that ran the shop when power went out, and belt driven machinery from the late 1800's early 1900's that was still in use. There is a forge house out back with a 1919 Bullard vertical turret lathe. The shop made a lot of new and refurbished parts for steam engines and did job shop work to keep the bills paid.

                    It's good too see companies like Fireball Tools still using the old tech that built this nation into a manufacturing powerhouse that it used to be...
                    So you know what I'm talking about. I've been writing and using G code since the late 70's, but I always had more fun running conventional machines compared to the CNC stuff. I used to love running this old Cincinnati Die Mill. The head was powered and could run in either direction as well as the spindle, and the knee was powered. I could make parts on that faster than a CNC guy could write a program. At Beech we had a forge and did our own heat treating and hammering out red hot parts. I used to love to run this giant surface grinder that was bigger than my grandmothers house. Gawd, the sound that thing made when you fired it up! I blew up the grinding wheel on that thing once, and half the shop ducked for cover while the rest ran to see if I was still in one piece. I used to entertain the foreman while running this big horizontal lathe by making the chips fly up and over the railing into the pattern makers shop upstairs. When I cleaned up the chips I had to sweep the 2nd story and the 1st story. But if you wanted clean hands at the end of the day I ran that French wire EDM. All the parts were underwater, and the tank drained when the part was done. Easy cleanup, just dry your hands with a towel. Man - those were the good old days. I still dream at night of working in that shop at Beech, making parts all night. I wake up tired out but happy.

                    Act your age, not your shoe size. - Prince

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by studemax View Post

                      So you know what I'm talking about. I've been writing and using G code since the late 70's, but I always had more fun running conventional machines compared to the CNC stuff. I used to love running this old Cincinnati Die Mill. The head was powered and could run in either direction as well as the spindle, and the knee was powered. I could make parts on that faster than a CNC guy could write a program. At Beech we had a forge and did our own heat treating and hammering out red hot parts. I used to love to run this giant surface grinder that was bigger than my grandmothers house. Gawd, the sound that thing made when you fired it up! I blew up the grinding wheel on that thing once, and half the shop ducked for cover while the rest ran to see if I was still in one piece. I used to entertain the foreman while running this big horizontal lathe by making the chips fly up and over the railing into the pattern makers shop upstairs. When I cleaned up the chips I had to sweep the 2nd story and the 1st story. But if you wanted clean hands at the end of the day I ran that French wire EDM. All the parts were underwater, and the tank drained when the part was done. Easy cleanup, just dry your hands with a towel. Man - those were the good old days. I still dream at night of working in that shop at Beech, making parts all night. I wake up tired out but happy.
                      I know exactly what you're talking about. Before I left the machine shops I ran Warner & Swasey AB's. I liked my job, it was interesting, and it required skill and hands on ability to run and set them up to run properly. My dad has been a machinist for 50yrs. He runs Gildemeisters these days, but he ran Acmes, Wickmans, and Conomatics back in the day. It's all about working with your hands, not a computer. He misses the old days, but he also likes the new tech where you punch numbers in and set-ups are a little easier. His back and knees took many years of abuse changing cams on Acmes. If he gets nostalgic he still has the first turret lathe I learned to machine on in his garage.

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                      • #12
                        I couldn't believe they paid me to do it. I had a ball almost every day making stuff. If I hadn't gotten hurt I would still be there, working until I was ready to retire.
                        Act your age, not your shoe size. - Prince

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                        • #13
                          Stude: I took Machine Shop all through High School (fall of '76 thru to end of Jun '79), and we had a shaper in the shop, used it plenty of times, not that difficult to use, and surprising how good of a surface finish you could get, with the right settings.

                          With all my H/S M/C shop, had I signed up as an apprentice, I could have challenged the First Year exam after only 125 hours of work experience......sometimes regret not going down that path.......

                          James

                          Originally posted by studemax View Post
                          I'm seriously impressed. This guy's shop skills are master class level. PLUS - he owns and knows how to use a SHAPER. These machines predate milling machines, and can make a shaving the size of a 2 by 4 (kidding), but it's incredible to watch. That shaper was probably over a hundred years old and it STILL WORKS LIKE A CHARM. I was a tool & die maker for 40 years, and I've never even seen one in person. Only the old timers knew how to run one. And I love his radial arm drill. I used to operate a 10 foot tall one when I worked at Beechcraft in the tool shop. Makes a drill motor look like a child's toy.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I am so glad you did. People can enjoy happy, well paid lives without a college education in the trades. Many people used to sneer at Jesse James because he was crude and got dirty working. But kids thought he was cool, and I was so glad they could see they didn't have to be doctors, lawyers, and accountants. They could have jobs where they used their brains AND their hands - the best of both worlds in my opinion, and frankly what our bodies are supposed to be doing.
                            Last edited by studemax; November 30, 2020, 01:22 PM.
                            Act your age, not your shoe size. - Prince

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