Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Paging Dan Stokes (Loren too)

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Paging Dan Stokes (Loren too)

    bring back any memories?
    Click image for larger version

Name:	image.png
Views:	133
Size:	360.6 KB
ID:	1345763
    and yes, it's for sale .... https://spokane.craigslist.org/cto/d...688772612.html

    to be honest, I don't think he's out of line with his price.... it is a lot of money but for a PHR feature car with known builders?
    Doing it all wrong since 1966

  • #2
    I actually had a few V8 Monzas . No tubs though .
    Previously HoosierL98GTA

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by SuperBuickGuy View Post
      bring back any memories?
      and yes, it's for sale ....

      to be honest, I don't think he's out of line with his price.... it is a lot of money but for a PHR feature car with known builders?

      Very nice car. Not for me but very nice.

      Comment


      • #4
        (Chuckle) I could write a long time about that, some good, some not good. A buddy and I (20 yrs old, circa '78-82) built the first so-called pro-street Vega in town, w/ stock front end such as this appears to have, and rear frame/tubbed/narrowed 12-bolt, 350/Muncie 4-speed. Wrecked only a few weeks after hitting the road, because he was a f'n idiot and it was a horrible, horrible handling car. In the passenger seat with no seatbelts I threw up my arms as taught in high school football and took the hit pretty well as we smashed into a parked car with me yelling for him to cut his stupid sh*t out (pardon the swearing but you should have been there). Since my own 215 canyon-racer Vegas were getting the front structure torn up I can't imagine how the small block one was going to be if it had lasted.

        I had an opportunity at a very nicely done '72 for 8K a couple years ago and passed, partly just because I didn't want to re-visit the whole thing. I might re-consider now...not sure. Really, generally speaking and with the way they were typically done, they were not good cars. Of course it would cost a lot to build one now, not like when they Vegas were lined up at the Pick-Your-Part with no takers.

        Certainly the V8 Vega thing was over with by the late-'80s. I must've missed that article.
        ...

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Loren View Post
          (Chuckle)

          Certainly the V8 Vega thing was over with by the late-'80s. I must've missed that article.
          I worked with a guy in the early 80's who put a thumpin' V8 in a Vega and it was pretty darned cool but if he romped it the windshield would bust. That's probably what kept him alive, come to think of it.
          Charter member of the Turd Nuggets

          Comment


          • #6
            My dad put a 215 in one. I don't ever remember riding in it.... that said, there were a lot of cars in my life growing up....
            Last edited by SuperBuickGuy; November 27, 2023, 08:32 AM.
            Doing it all wrong since 1966

            Comment


            • #7
              The Vega actually had a pretty good suspension/chassis, if light-duty, and the 215 deal worked very well because the weight was within what it could handle. It would take a built, high-compression Vega motor to make 140 hp, a stock totally mild 215 made, I think, 160 so you got more power (and nicer sound!) for free as far as paying for any compromises goes. The Vega Saginaw 4-speed fit right in still, rearward about an inch and a half so you had to shorten the shifter linkage (best to keep the stock floor-mount shifter because an aftermarket one meant cutting the trans tunnel which was vital structure) and driveshaft and tweak the trans crossmember. I had a Buick 215 going together with a cam and some other stuff, and wound up selling it all. Still I had one more Vega after that, a "Millionth" edition with a 4-speed and every option and an amazing 125K on the original engine, it was a fun commuter for a year or so. Even the MIL liked to drive it. I went deep into Baja California with it once, got home to northern L.A. at midnight, the next morning before going to work I checked the oil (always) and the nuts on the 2bbl carb had come off the studs and it had been sitting there just held down by vacuum for Lord-knows how many miles.

              My best Mulholland car was w/ a built 4, fat sway bars well-tuned to each other, shocks, cut springs and a set of 50-series Radial T/As. When I went to the Olds 215 I left the suspension softer but used bigger brakes and it was better going up and down Angeles Crest which stock Vega brakes could definitely NOT take. I remember once, with stockers, going down Decker Canyon in Malibu and when I hit Pacific Coast Highway I went 30 feet past the stop sign 'cause the brakes were so finished.

              With that, my Vega was nearly the fastest car on the hill that summer, faster was a first-gen Capri with an owner who was a really nice, smart guy. The two of us evaded the cops one night, what a ride that was. Should I be admitting this? I wonder whatever happened to him.

              That PHR car, up top, would have been something I dreamed of once and I suppose be fun at cruise night. I know a couple with a 454 wagon w/ similar build, it sits in the garage looking cool, next to a '66 Nova which seems to get more use. If I ever had another Vega it would be with smaller rear tires and a properly-built full-on chassis so that it handled at-least reasonably and wouldn't be coming apart at the seams up front.

              Another friend had a 454 wagon, purchased already built. It used a solid rod for the throttle between the pedal lever and carb, to test the car he flashed the converter in the driveway and the solid-mount motor torqued the chassis over so far that the rod jammed in its hole in the firewall at near WOT. This would result in his very nice Vega ramming into the back of his very nice Firebird and damaging both cars. The upside was that he would have otherwise been across the street and into the neighbors' yard before being able to get it shut off.

              Another Vega story: The hatchbacks were so great in that you could fold down the rear seat and sleep in the back, super-handy for someone in their early twenties. If it was warm you left the hatch up. My first kid's mom and I stupidly placed an ice cooler on the roof at a campground in Yosemite and woke up to a smallish-size bear looking at us through the window glass, literally two feet away. I pulled the hatch down but had to slide up front and start/move the car before the bear would get off. Then it wouldn't leave the campsite until I charged at it...the third time. So I tied the cooler to a tree branch, down the road by the bathrooms, by standing on the roof...all this at about 3 in the morning. People leaving the next day would have seen the cooler hanging there. I didn't report any of that, after pondering the whole thing and realizing the report would probably just go into a file labelled "What an Idiot", somebody who thinks all the bear warnings don't apply to them. I have said many times in my existence that my thing is that I have to make every possible mistake, once. That was my nicest 215 car, lowered/black/7&8" five-lug wheels and steel fender flares, it got a lot of attention and Marlan Davis offered to do an article on it which I for some reason chose to not follow through on. Anyway on the way out of the park the next day, a Sunday, I broke the clutch cable and with no parts available drove the whole way back to Los Angeles with no clutch and nearly out of money having spent it all on the week-long trip.

              Good for a smile now but no I would really not do any of that over again. Perhaps why I didn't buy the '72.

              ...

              Comment


              • #8
                I loved my 215 Vega even though I used the air cooled automatic which surprisingly seemed to work well. Dave G - Ray O ended up with it and his first wife LOVED that car. I built it in the late 70's and it would stomp the TransAms of that era - really frustrated the gold chain crowd. I did the paint with the stock dark green on the bottom and the top surfaces in a super bright silver ('62 Buick color for those interested). It was pretty, sounded great, and was fun to drive. I had different engines in it but the best one had home-ported heads (port match, clean up the bowls, remove the limited casting flask, notch the top of the bores for better air flow off the intake valves), Kenne Bell cam and kit, Offy intake and Holly 390 CFM carb, all installed with a D&D Kit (I think those are still available though I bet you would have to wait!).

                Pic of the "good" engine


                Click image for larger version  Name:	scan411.jpg Views:	0 Size:	575.9 KB ID:	1345811


                Pic of an earlier body. I later found an Arizona body and transferred everything over then did the above-described paint job. I don't seem to have a pic of that body.


                Click image for larger version  Name:	scan412.jpg Views:	0 Size:	624.4 KB ID:	1345812
                Last edited by DanStokes; November 27, 2023, 01:26 PM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Could you imagine one of these lite cars with today’s base turbo 4 and 6 speed out of a Camaro. The lack of weight on nose would help with the handling and braking .

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Loren View Post
                    The Vega actually had a pretty good suspension/chassis, if light-duty, and the 215 deal worked very well because the weight was within what it could handle.
                    Your memory is faulty. Here, let me help you. Simply because I didn't have a V8 Vega did not mean I did not have a Vega. I had 74 Wagon. Great car, except for the engine, trans, suspension. But let's focus on that K member. It would crack - a lot. Usually where it attached to the frame rails. You dared not put a bigger motor in it because of that k-member issue - a fact which seemed to miss the GM memo bus because it's the same suspension as was under the later Skyhawk, Monza, and Starfires. all of which cracked with aplomb, especially the 262 v8 cars.. of which I had more then several (including my first turbo - a 76 with a 79 hot air 231 turbo and 5 speed).

                    Originally posted by 2020 mustang View Post
                    Could you imagine one of these lite cars with today’s base turbo 4 and 6 speed out of a Camaro. The lack of weight on nose would help with the handling and braking .
                    There is, actually, a (how to color this without recommending it) Cosworth Vega which was pretty respectable for its day and time. In fact, pretty sure it was a Cosworth that a friend offered to my dad which convinced him to sell the V8 vega.... and after, either the guy refused to sell it or it had some major, life-ending issue....
                    Last edited by SuperBuickGuy; November 27, 2023, 04:04 PM.
                    Doing it all wrong since 1966

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      My faulty memory recalls that what is here being called the K-member was only a bolt-in crossmember, unlikely to "crack" at the mounting points to the control arm structure because bolt-in, and made to flex. In my years of use and junkyard crawling I never saw a failed one although Motion Performance pushed their luck by cutting out for exhaust.. Unlike what we normally call a K-member there were no lower control arm mounting points involved as those were on the stamped-sheetmetal wings that went from the bottom of the frame up along the inner fenders. But you must have had something different so I as-well can't help you.
                      ...

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by SuperBuickGuy View Post

                        Your memory is faulty. Here, let me help you. Simply because I didn't have a V8 Vega did not mean I did not have a Vega. I had 74 Wagon. Great car, except for the engine, trans, suspension. But let's focus on that K member. It would crack - a lot. Usually where it attached to the frame rails. You dared not put a bigger motor in it because of that k-member issue - a fact which seemed to miss the GM memo bus because it's the same suspension as was under the later Skyhawk, Monza, and Starfires. all of which cracked with aplomb, especially the 262 v8 cars.. of which I had more then several (including my first turbo - a 76 with a 79 hot air 231 turbo and 5 speed).



                        There is, actually, a (how to color this without recommending it) Cosworth Vega which was pretty respectable for its day and time. In fact, pretty sure it was a Cosworth that a friend offered to my dad which convinced him to sell the V8 vega.... and after, either the guy refused to sell it or it had some major, life-ending issue....
                        Yes I know about the Cosworth. I had one in high school, that said the turbo 4 has a lot more hp and torque and you don't need to whined it up to get to it.
                        Last edited by 2020 mustang; November 28, 2023, 12:06 AM.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Loren View Post
                          My faulty memory recalls that what is here being called the K-member was only a bolt-in crossmember, unlikely to "crack" at the mounting points to the control arm structure because bolt-in, and made to flex. In my years of use and junkyard crawling I never saw a failed one although Motion Performance pushed their luck by cutting out for exhaust.. Unlike what we normally call a K-member there were no lower control arm mounting points involved as those were on the stamped-sheetmetal wings that went from the bottom of the frame up along the inner fenders. But you must have had something different so I as-well can't help you.
                          I failed plenty of them.... probably should put that on my skills section of my resume.

                          it would pull apart at the bolts then eventually crack. Of course, once it started cracking, it was an neverending fight. IF I was to ever do one, it'd get a tube cage.
                          Doing it all wrong since 1966

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by 2020 mustang View Post

                            Yes I know about the Cosworth. I had one in high school, that said the turbo 4 has a lot more hp and torque and you don't need to whined it up to get to it.
                            true, but in the 'mod' section of Vegas - Cosworth was > 215. 231 was > cosworth.

                            Still, like the car I posted.... it's a cheap way to get into 'show' cars.....

                            and in that vein, still not sure what's going in the Fiat.
                            Last edited by SuperBuickGuy; November 28, 2023, 11:31 AM.
                            Doing it all wrong since 1966

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by DanStokes View Post


                              Click image for larger version Name:	scan412.jpg Views:	0 Size:	624.4 KB ID:	1345812
                              Somehow there's something about a 4 bolt wheel pattern that just screams high performance.
                              Charter member of the Turd Nuggets

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X