Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Future classics/ investment

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Re: Future classics/ investment

    I have yet to lose money on a car, buying, selling or trading.
    I once bought an 84 Monte SS for $150 and a Pioneer amp and sold it for $2500 bucks.
    One night I sold both my 71 Cutlasses and never had a car to drive to work the next day, but it was such a good deal I just took the next day off!!!
    I have done countless deals and midnight trades.

    Leave a comment:


  • Phil318
    replied
    Re: Future classics/ investment

    87-88 t-bird turbo coupes, mid nineties Impala SS, 02-03 Mercury Marauders. Could probably throw the G8 into the mix also.

    Leave a comment:


  • Barry_R
    replied
    Re: Future classics/ investment

    Unmolested 80's Fox body Mustangs.
    Stupidly popular in their day.
    Darn near every one of them has been tuned, tweaked, cut and raced.
    Not many stock ones left.

    Doesn't that sound a lot like the 60's musclecar scenario?

    Leave a comment:


  • mlcraven
    replied
    Re: Future classics/ investment

    Originally posted by NMCA_Ron
    Or better yet, get a boat. EVERYONE knows boats increase in value and require little to zero maintenence!
    Oh yeah...especially the wooden ones. New millionaires being made every day out of those

    Leave a comment:


  • Monster
    replied
    Re: Future classics/ investment

    Originally posted by Brad54
    I just bought my wife a '61 Corvair wagon for her daily driver.
    It's a rare body style -- only '61 and part of '62. They made about 20,000 total
    ... the 4-door wagon is very practical for a mom, it looks cute as hell, gets great mileage, and it suits her to a "T".
    Brad, I love corvairs and would really like to see a picture of your wife's wagon.
    ;)

    Leave a comment:


  • Bamfster
    replied
    Re: Future classics/ investment

    Originally posted by NMCA_Ron
    Or better yet, get a boat. EVERYONE knows boats increase in value and require little to zero maintenence!


    Ron


    Wanna buy a bridge?
    The only thing better is an RV.....wink wink

    Leave a comment:


  • Ron Ward
    replied
    Re: Future classics/ investment

    Or better yet, get a boat. EVERYONE knows boats increase in value and require little to zero maintenence!


    Ron


    Wanna buy a bridge?

    Leave a comment:


  • Ron Ward
    replied
    Re: Future classics/ investment

    Don,

    Too many speculators in the car market now. Invest in old motorcycles. With fuel prices expected to rise, people won't want a gas guzzling car like your Road Runner and they will be looking for something less fuel thirsty. They are going to want a vintage Triumph or BSA.


    ;D


    Ron

    Leave a comment:


  • HEMI
    replied
    Re: Future classics/ investment

    I bought stock in British Petroleum(BP).At $3.36 per share div.,I figure that my fuel cost's
    are zero.I reinvest and it earns more than most other investments and does in sooner.

    Leave a comment:


  • Memphis
    replied
    Re: Future classics/ investment

    Cars I see still bringing in decent money are 1LE and B4C cars so I could see them becoming more valuable. Also hardtop 4th gen V8 F-bodies.

    Leave a comment:


  • mlcraven
    replied
    Re: Future classics/ investment

    Originally posted by squirrel
    The best "investments" are the things that no one (including you) sees coming.

    I always laugh when someone uses the words "car" and "investment" in the same sentence.

    Me too, it's almost always oxymoronic for most of us (always for me :'( ). However, "car" and "fun", "car" and "character", "car" and "satisfaction", car" and "thrill", the combinations can prob go on forever.

    Leave a comment:


  • mrocketscience
    replied
    Re: Future classics/ investment

    88 Chevy Caprice wagon... Money, baby ;)

    Leave a comment:


  • Brad54
    replied
    Re: Future classics/ investment

    Originally posted by squirrel
    If you can beat the depreciation curve, and put some miles on a car, and have fun with it, you're doing a lot better than 99% of the driving public.

    Bingo! I just bought my wife a '61 Corvair wagon for her daily driver. It's about 80-percent finished, and I paid a lot for a Corvair--$5700, including a pair of 1-way plane tickets to pick it up. It's a rare body style, which will help in the future--only '61 and part of '62. They made about 20,000 total, but how many are left today?

    She needed a car, that fit within our budget, the 4-door wagon is very practical for a mom, it looks cute as hell, gets great mileage, and it suits her to a "T".
    There's probably a pretty big list of newer cars I could have gotten for that price, but they'd have all had high-ish mileage, they'd have computers, I wouldn't be able to work on them myself (maybe "wouldn't WANT to work on them" is better), and they'd be getting into their "repair" years--so the money spent finishing it and keeping it on the road is probably what a newer $5700 car would be, annually.
    But even if I found a late-model gem for that same money, they'll continue depreciating like a stone.

    Now, if my wife drives the tires off that 'Vair for the next 5-10 years, and I keep it looking nice and running well, it's going to be worth a lot more when I sell it than the late-model car bought this year for the same price and sold 5-10 years down the road.

    And won't be nearly as fun to drive, won't look nearly as good, and won't be loved nearly as much as she loves that wagon.

    Same deal with my '62 Suburban. It'll depreciate, but it's bottom-dollar value will be worth more than any newer truck I'd buy. And that's if I don't do a thing to the rough body.

    That's how I look at old cars as an investment.

    -Brad

    Leave a comment:


  • Hemi Joel
    replied
    Re: Future classics/ investment

    In my business, (commercial & industrial roofing) I get the opportunity to rub elbows with some incredibly smart customers.
    Guys who have started with almost nothing and parlayed it into multi-million dollar real estate portfolios. There are three bits of wisdom that 3 separate owners have given me regarding real estate, that I try to apply to car purchases. "When you buy dogs, you own dogs", "when you buy the best, it only hurts once", and "you make the best buys when there is a little blood in the streets".

    Also, when I was a juvenile delinquent trying to buy my first old car, my Dad and his buddy Steve explained to me that it costs almost nothing extra to restore a convertible compared to a non-convertible, but the convert is worth alot more when it is done. Later, cars with more than one carb got added to the same theory.

    I would apply these theories to the topic at hand. If you want a shot at future appreciation, buy a car that is more desirable than the ordinary, due to features that set it apart from the crowd. Buy a car that has good provinance, like rare and matching numbers and well documented. And buy quality. Like original body panels, little or no history of rust or damage. Remember, if it is cheap and easy to buy because it is lacking in these qualities, it will be cheap and hard to sell later.
    Also, there is defenetely a little "blood in the streets" now. It is a good time to buy.


    And of course, like others have said, the best reason to buy something is because you like it. If you (or your estate) profit later, that's just icing on the cake.

    Leave a comment:


  • antmnte
    replied
    Re: Future classics/ investment

    I wish I bought a 94-96 Impala SS back then I was thinking about it but didnt do it. I like that car alot and It
    would have held it value well. I guess the G8 is the last of the breed, I didnt buy it for that but I think if I hang on
    to it long enough maybe it will be collectible,im still gonna drive the snot out of it though.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X