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  • Help, and don't laugh ;)

    Well doctors are still looking over the test the other day, but one thing I have to so, is work out more, not so much weights, but walks, bike rides, running(can't knees) anything that gets the heart rate up and stays there ..

    So, even tho. there isn't really the money for it, I'm thinking of getting an ipod..
    I downloaded itune10. burning from CD to mp3 for the ipod looks easy enough,
    but what about albums and tapes, ?
    what software do I need to convert the analog source to digital mp3's or whatever an ipod uses?
    Apple wasn't all that helpfull and see'n as me recording instead of buy'n from the itune store I can see why..
    any help will be great..
    I need tunes to exercise I have an walkman(c/d) but the ipod would be handier


  • #2
    Re: Help, and don't laugh ;)

    I've got a small Sansa Clip MP3 player w/FM tuner that I take to the gym with me. The interface on the PC isn't that great, but it works.

    When I'm not particular about the song order, etc I have a Sirus Stilleto 2 Satellite radio. It's portable, though the built in antenna is pretty weak, it automatically records the radio stations you listen too and you can play them back later, skipping songs that you don't care much for. DVR for radio if you will. There is about 100 hours of radio recorded on it. I've plugged it in and set it on a window sill where it get's reception and leave it on a radio station all day, so there is a day's worth of music ready to be listened to later. I play the radio recordings all day at work. Then of course I plug it into the car(s) for trips with the car antenna for live radio. It also supports loading MP3's being loaded onto it and playing back.
    Escaped on a technicality.

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    • #3
      Re: Help, and don't laugh ;)

      as long as your music is on CD it's pretty much plug and play. Most computers come with some form of CD cataloging system, so you plug your music CD in; it asks whether or not you want to save it on your computer; then it asks what format - MP3 being most popular, but be warned that it clips the music so it won't take up too much space. Clipping is where it takes the highs and lows off - if you're an audiophile it can be pretty annoying. Once you download the music to your computer, you can then put it on your IPOD with software from Apple.
      Or you can buy MP3s online and download them to your IPOD...
      Doing it all wrong since 1966

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      • #4
        Re: Help, and don't laugh ;)

        There's a program called Audacity, it's open source and free

        http://audacity.sourceforge.net/

        that will let you record and "fix" digital mp3 files of records, tapes, etc. What you have to do is use a cable with RCA plugs at one end, connected to the line out of your preamp (which is connected to your tape deck or record player). the other end of the cable has a headphone plug that you plug into the "line in" connection on your computer. Then you run the program, and record the mp3 file while the music is playing. I haven't used it for a year or so so I foreget the details, but if you have trouble you can ask.

        also you can use CDex

        http://cdexos.sourceforge.net/

        to make mp3s from audio CDs. It's also open source and free.

        My fabulous web page

        "If it don't go, chrome it!" --Stroker McGurk

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        • #5
          Re: Help, and don't laugh ;)

          It depends on how much you actually want to convert. If there's only a few records or tapes, it'd probably be easier and cheaper to download them instead of buying the hardware and software to do it yourself.
          Who needs sugar and spice and everything nice? I'm a Southern girl - give me cars, guns and whiskey on ice. ~Mrs. Remy-Z

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          • #6
            Re: Help, and don't laugh ;)

            bought wife a sylvania mp3 for like 20 bucks -upgraded the headphones to nice sony ones 49 at radio shack

            i guess you can go to itunes to get music . or steal it .or get a podcast from wsou or knac or some metal site

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            • #7
              Re: Help, and don't laugh ;)

              Originally posted by squirrel
              There's a program called Audacity, it's open source and free

              http://audacity.sourceforge.net/

              that will let you record and "fix" digital mp3 files of records, tapes, etc. What you have to do is use a cable with RCA plugs at one end, connected to the line out of your preamp (which is connected to your tape deck or record player). the other end of the cable has a headphone plug that you plug into the "line in" connection on your computer. Then you run the program, and record the mp3 file while the music is playing. I haven't used it for a year or so so I foreget the details, but if you have trouble you can ask.

              also you can use CDex

              http://cdexos.sourceforge.net/

              to make mp3s from audio CDs. It's also open source and free.

              /\ This.


              Mark, don't you have some DJing equipment lying around? For tapes and albums, it's nice to use a better preamp than what's onboard most computer soundcards. I have a simple Mackie mixer that I use two channels (L+R) when converting tapes or especially albums to CD, running the sound from the tape desk through the mackie channels then into the PC. You want to make sure the gain is as high as you can get it without clipping, going into the PC as well. That's important to maximize sound quality.

              Finally, when asked about the size (more likely, Bitrate) of the MP3 files you want to create, my opinion is either 160kbps or 128kbps. The 160s will take up 5-7megabytes per song, the 128s a little less, but your if your ear is healthy youl'll hear the lower quality difference in the 128kb file, which is audible above 16khz (so says my ear anyways).


              www.realtuners.com - catch the RealTuners Radio Podcast on Youtube, Facebook, iTunes, and anywhere else podcasts are distributed!

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              • #8
                Re: Help, and don't laugh ;)

                I have no real sense of quality music, but I can usually hear the degradation of sound quality at the 120kbps. I usually go for 196kps since the memory space on the players are usually 2 to16 Gigabytes now a 5 to 7 megabyte song isn't much of an issue unless you have several thousand songs you want to load on there. My library isn't that large though, I prefer random radio to playlists though.
                Escaped on a technicality.

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                • #9
                  Re: Help, and don't laugh ;)

                  Originally posted by dieselgeek
                  which is audible above 16khz (so says my ear anyways).
                  if you can still hear stuff up in that frequency range, you need to spend even more time at the races!

                  My fabulous web page

                  "If it don't go, chrome it!" --Stroker McGurk

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                  • #10
                    Re: Help, and don't laugh ;)

                    Originally posted by squirrel
                    There's a program called Audacity, it's open source and free

                    http://audacity.sourceforge.net/

                    that will let you record and "fix" digital mp3 files of records, tapes, etc. What you have to do is use a cable with RCA plugs at one end, connected to the line out of your preamp (which is connected to your tape deck or record player). the other end of the cable has a headphone plug that you plug into the "line in" connection on your computer. Then you run the program, and record the mp3 file while the music is playing. I haven't used it for a year or so so I foreget the details, but if you have trouble you can ask.

                    also you can use CDex

                    http://cdexos.sourceforge.net/

                    to make mp3s from audio CDs. It's also open source and free.

                    I do that all the time. Audacity is good stuff.

                    one can even reverse the whole thing if you radio has a tape deck recorder..make tapes for an older car, from stuff on your computer.

                    Previously boxer3main
                    the death rate and fairy tales cannot kill the nature left behind.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Help, and don't laugh ;)

                      Originally posted by dieselgeek
                      Originally posted by squirrel
                      There's a program called Audacity, it's open source and free

                      http://audacity.sourceforge.net/

                      that will let you record and "fix" digital mp3 files of records, tapes, etc. What you have to do is use a cable with RCA plugs at one end, connected to the line out of your preamp (which is connected to your tape deck or record player). the other end of the cable has a headphone plug that you plug into the "line in" connection on your computer. Then you run the program, and record the mp3 file while the music is playing. I haven't used it for a year or so so I foreget the details, but if you have trouble you can ask.

                      also you can use CDex

                      http://cdexos.sourceforge.net/

                      to make mp3s from audio CDs. It's also open source and free.

                      /\ This.


                      Mark, don't you have some DJing equipment lying around? For tapes and albums, it's nice to use a better preamp than what's onboard most computer soundcards. I have a simple Mackie mixer that I use two channels (L+R) when converting tapes or especially albums to CD, running the sound from the tape desk through the mackie channels then into the PC. You want to make sure the gain is as high as you can get it without clipping, going into the PC as well. That's important to maximize sound quality.

                      Finally, when asked about the size (more likely, Bitrate) of the MP3 files you want to create, my opinion is either 160kbps or 128kbps. The 160s will take up 5-7megabytes per song, the 128s a little less, but your if your ear is healthy youl'll hear the lower quality difference in the 128kb file, which is audible above 16khz (so says my ear anyways).


                      yes.. I want the best sound files (less compression)
                      I have a hifi carver preamp and a macintosh very high end preamp..
                      and yes I can here the difference in the sound of the standard mp3 file..
                      so what software out of the two listed works better..
                      I'll be running the anolog source (album/tape) through a preamp (needed with the dual hifi turntable. and into a eq with 30) 1/3rd octive adjustments.. to bring out the lowend on albums (mastered that way for less hum) and tapes that loose in the highs..
                      I have a dolby labs noise reduction with dobly b,c,

                      and catchmeblue.. I was a DJ for years.. did all the local school dances, parties/weddings/etc
                      I have 5200 albums (12" singles and full records) and 1400 catt.. 200 real to real, 300 ish mini cd singles,
                      and 20000 cd's

                      so D/g because of this and me wanting less compression... I'm looking at the 160gig ipod
                      it will not hold anywhere near it all. but should be big enough to store a lot of music..
                      it's a hard drive memory storage..
                      the new nano is flash (8 or 16gig) and holds alot.. but it's 179 for 16 gigs and the 160gig is 249.00
                      the desktop has a pro soundblaster card..
                      I've already played with itunes.. the cd to file is easy..
                      I'm gonna go look at the software jim posted..
                      thanks for the help..
                      any other ideas..???
                      I have a 1 tig ex hard drive to store only the music.. so I'll have a home radio dj mix and hook it itto the b & k
                      and I know the ipod no matter the compression will not match a c/d never mind an anolog recording.. but I want it not to sound like it's coming out of a 1980 sanyo mono catt boom box..lol

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                      • #12
                        Re: Help, and don't laugh ;)

                        only down side of the hard drive ipod is moving parts...
                        don't understand the price difference(disc to flash)
                        other than marketing..
                        that and not many people could fill 160gigs of space..
                        I know hard disc wear like any moving parts..
                        whats the life of burn and read of flash memory?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Help, and don't laugh ;)

                          Flash memory does have a limited life. I have an old 128m thumb drive that quit working a couple years ago, and a 1 gig that also quit not too long ago. My FIL tried to explain to my why it has limited life (he used to work for IBM in their memory products division, and was working on his PHD in EE)

                          Hard drives give a lot more surface area to store stuff on, and it's just a magnetic coating. Flash memory has a transistor (or two) for each bit, so a 16g flash drive has billions of transistors, that all have to be manufactured and work right. They are both commodities. Generally when someone can make more memory for less money, they do so. that's why disk or flash storge that used to cost thousands (or millions) of dollars now costs $10. The first PC hard drives were about 10mb and cost a couple grand. Now you get 100,000 times as much storage for 1/40th the price.

                          I'd suggest keeping a couple of external drives with your music files stored on them, so you don't lose the files after you spend all that time recording them. Hard drives can die without warning. Always have at least one backup.

                          My fabulous web page

                          "If it don't go, chrome it!" --Stroker McGurk

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                          • #14
                            Re: Help, and don't laugh ;)

                            I spent about 4 days around Christmas copying most of my CD's to my laptop then loading them into itunes and transferring them to my ipod.I then erased them from the hard drive,free up space,and repeated. It took a while,really a long time, but I have about 2500 songs in my ipod.
                            Some of the albums and even just some songs,must have been encrypted because they did not copy well at all. For example NONE of the Springsteen stuff copied 100% some are missing back tracks,vocals or are in MONO. Several ZZTop songs are screwed up as well. It's not hard but does eat up a lot of time.

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