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  • New Shop Planning

    I love the pool of knowledge we have here on BS so I will tap it for input on building my new shop.

    Wifey is pushing me to get started on the new shop. She also keeps reminding me to do it how I want to because it's probably going to be my shop for quite a few years.

    As for size, it will be a 24 x 24 mainly because that's all the space I have to build it in. That is a little bigger than my last one (20 x 24) and I was perfectly happy with it.

    Seeing that this will be constructed in my backyard, I am considering making it look more "tin barn-ish" than "shop-ish". My last one was a stick building with lap siding and it was a bit ugly and the steel buildings are very utilitarian looking. Wifey actually suggested it because she saw some examples on Pinterest that she considered "cute". Whatever. Since it will be barn-ish, I thought, why not just build a pole barn with a tin roof and exterior walls, then come back and finish out the inside with a concrete floor and pegboard or masonite walls. For doors, I will probably use hanging slider doors because a garage type door just would not look right.

    One thing I am reading conflicting stuff about is whether or not to embed the posts (treated) in concrete or not. Remember I live in a very dry climate, so I don't think rotting is going be a problem for the next 30+ years. My Dad's barn was just direct bury, tamp with dirt and it's been solid as a rock since 1983. Of course I am in town so I have code enforcement to contend with, so they may have the final say in however I do it.

    Floor: would a floating slab poured inside be fine? Basically like pouring a driveway-type slab inside it after the posts are in. Actually, the best way might to be to have a driveway poured, then come back and build over it...

    Basic frame like this but with more trusses. I just threw this together the other night.
    Attached Files
    Last edited by BBR; July 16, 2012, 03:26 PM.
    Life is short. Be a do'er and not a shoulda done'er.
    1969 Galaxie 500 https://bangshift.com/forum/forum/ba...69-galaxie-500
    1998 Mustang GT https://bangshift.com/forum/forum/ba...ix-to-4sixzero
    1983 Mustang GT 545/552/302/Turbo302 http://www.bangshift.com/forum/forum...485-bbr-s-83gt
    1973 F-250 BBF Turbo Truck http://www.bangshift.com/forum/forum...uck-conversion
    1986 Ford Ranger EFI 545/C6 https://bangshift.com/forum/forum/ba...tooth-and-nail

  • #2
    Dry climate or not, I vote for treated 6 X 6 posts...........
    Looks like a nice design, and you can always beef up the rafters to support some overhead storage.
    Gonna put in a lift? Looks like 10' walls......
    I need to do this too.
    Ed, Mary, & 'Earl'
    HRPT LongHaulers, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12, 13, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19.


    Inside every old person is a young person wondering, "what the hell happened?"

    The man at the top of the mountain didn't fall there. -Vince Lombardi

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    • #3
      Yes 10' height and definitely 6x6 posts. Lift? Not in the cards at this time. I think just take up too much floor space and I don't want this to turn into a "hey James, can I borrow your lift?" type thing. The upper would be floored for storage (and for my kids to goof around) Back wall section would be work bench and storage cabinet area.
      Life is short. Be a do'er and not a shoulda done'er.
      1969 Galaxie 500 https://bangshift.com/forum/forum/ba...69-galaxie-500
      1998 Mustang GT https://bangshift.com/forum/forum/ba...ix-to-4sixzero
      1983 Mustang GT 545/552/302/Turbo302 http://www.bangshift.com/forum/forum...485-bbr-s-83gt
      1973 F-250 BBF Turbo Truck http://www.bangshift.com/forum/forum...uck-conversion
      1986 Ford Ranger EFI 545/C6 https://bangshift.com/forum/forum/ba...tooth-and-nail

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      • #4
        If you're going to pour a slab........can you just put up your frame walls
        on the slab in your neck of the woods?
        That's how we do it in our area......frost isn't an issue in your area so you can
        pour it a little thicker on the outer edges....maybe use a six sack mix.

        A 24x24 is pretty straight forward and easy to build and you can pretty much
        finish any way you want on outside.

        Would definitely do at least 10' side walls.

        Just a thought
        Thom

        "The object is to keep your balls on the table and knock everybody else's off..."

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        • #5
          at least 2 story, and enough height for a lift - even if you don't install one
          Doing it all wrong since 1966

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          • #6
            Just thinking ahead to when you decide you can't live without a lift, figure out where you would put one and make sure the floor is 7" to 8" thick basically in the area where you would drill the holes to mount a Rotary style lift. One plus would be a lift would give you an extra parking spot when not in use. I have a lift and friends wanting to use it hasn't been a problem, oh wait, I don't have any friends that's why!
            sigpic

            Just an Old Drag Racer that still has dreams of going fast!

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            • #7
              I have a pole barn, it was here already when I moved in. I never did anything with it besides sort of keep the roof fixed, and store crap in it. I can't imagine having to work in there. It has a dirt floor, and a coupe telephone poles in the middle, holding up the roof.

              I suggest putting in a real slab first, you can disguise it as a driveway, but make sure it has the required stuff to support the walls. I guess having had a nice insulated shop for almost 20 years has spoiled me.
              My fabulous web page

              "If it don't go, chrome it!" --Stroker McGurk

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              • #8
                Originally posted by SuperBuickGuy View Post
                at least 2 story, and enough height for a lift - even if you don't install one
                Someday you might get old and want that lift...don't do anything to preclude it.

                I've been researching lifts for the last couple of days. Generally you only need a 4" slab to support one. If you have to go back and retrofit, things get much deeper. Because my concrete floor is 76 years old, the concrete is sketchy and it's no where close to 4", I've got to cut out 4'x4' pads and pour at least 8" of concrete. I'll add rebar, or wire.

                Lighting and adequate electricity is important. If you can do it, you might want to plan on a separate space for a large compressor, that way you can insulate it and cut down on the noise.

                We built our 80x36 barn by putting up the metal framework and then pouring the aisle. Working the concrete was a pain in the ass. However that was because we did it ourselves. Its pretty common in home building to pour the garage floor with the flat work, so it can clearly be done after the exterior is put up.

                Lots of good reading at http://www.garagejournal.com/
                I'm still learning

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                • #9
                  I had a huge post with a bunch of ideas. Backspace in the wrong place and your post is gone. Whah. I'd pour the slab now, figure where you need 6" or more for the bridgeport, you can insulate it later. If you don't have a slab, you get barn rats. Wifey will not like them.



                  slab it, insulate now and keep the barn rats out!

                  Flying south, with a flock of bird dogs.

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                  • #10
                    PI have a 24 w X 28 deep that suits me fine.It 10'tall .I put some thick concrete out sid for a futture lift.I have everytning on rollers to make cleaning an rearaging easier. I try to make it a point not to store stuff on the floor unlesx its for a current project. Keeps everything cleaner.I will post pics later. Good luck with it!I SORRY POSTNG FROM MY PHONE
                    Last edited by NASBackyard; July 16, 2012, 06:04 PM.
                    61 Olds 88, 69 Plymouth Roadrunner, 68 Pontiac Firebird, 95 Buick Roadmaster LT1

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                    • #11
                      i'm not a fan of pole barns. if your going to insulate or run electrical in the walls it's a lot more work than stud walls.

                      since your so far south and have minimal or no frost line,
                      your better off to pour a slab with thickened edges and do conventional framing.
                      framed walls, floor trusses and a conventional framed roof will be your most economical way to get a free span floor.
                      a less expensive alternative would be a series of posts and a beam down the center (not my choice)

                      a barn style roof offers a lot more storage than a hip roof
                      this is my current shop 50x50, it's bigger than i need or use but it was here when i bought the place



                      this was a fun roof to build at my place in north carolina
                      also offered lots of space upstairs. this was my old shop

                      HRPT Long Hauler 2011, 2012, 2014

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                      • #12
                        Many years ago when I was running a 5 yard lumber chain..........we would sell what was called an attic truss.
                        It allows for extra storage above.

                        As mentioned........traditional framing on a slab is going to make it easier to wire and insulate.
                        Out in your area an R-13 sidewall with drywall should provide adequate insulation......also consider using
                        a house wrap (Tyvec).

                        Depending on code........consider a floor drain and toilet provisions.
                        A 100 amp box should be sufficient for all electrical.

                        As mentioned a lift system would a great addition and they're not that expensive.
                        Thom

                        "The object is to keep your balls on the table and knock everybody else's off..."

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                        • #13
                          I've seen the proof that it gets cold in your area...........and I hear it can get a tad hot too.

                          You would be best to build a stick framed building. Should be just as cheap (or expensive, however you wish to look at it!) as a pole building, once you figure in the cost of finishing off the inside so you can heat or cool it.

                          I will get 10x more use from mine when I can at least heat it. It will not be cheap to get to that point.

                          I hear you on the door appeal visually. But sliders are going to be hard to seal up, real hard. There goes your heating budget. I've thought of adding overhead doors recessed slightly to my barn, leaving the old barn sliders for a stealth shop. I won't do it, but I've had the thought, just to help seal it up. I will lose my sliders in order to put nice metal siding on (in order to close up the gaps, see a trend here?)

                          I'd also lean REAL hard on having a partial cement sidewall. You can make a cheap 8' building 10' or 12' or 14' real easy by just sitting it on a taller foundation. And that cement sidewall makes cleanup super easy without subjecting your structure or insulation to unwanted moisture.

                          I just built a 24'x24', still moving crap in. Its sandrail oriented so I didn't go high on the walls. Hopefully I can stash 4 rails in here without too much trouble. Here is Dad-in-law and buddy Jim breaking it in right. Little rum-n-coke christening.....

                          Of all the paths you take in life - make sure a few of them are dirt.

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                          • #14
                            Yeah......building a short wall and framing on top is a good idea.
                            Ditto on the easy cleaning.
                            Thom

                            "The object is to keep your balls on the table and knock everybody else's off..."

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                            • #15
                              Thanks for the ideas and input. My last building was a stick building and it was not insulated. Cold in the winter, hot in the summer. I did have a swamp cooler in it and that was nice, and I just used a free-standing propane heater in the winter. It kept me warm enough for what I do as long as it was pointed in my general direction. If it's too hot or too cold, I'd way rather be in the house surfing BangShift anyway.
                              Life is short. Be a do'er and not a shoulda done'er.
                              1969 Galaxie 500 https://bangshift.com/forum/forum/ba...69-galaxie-500
                              1998 Mustang GT https://bangshift.com/forum/forum/ba...ix-to-4sixzero
                              1983 Mustang GT 545/552/302/Turbo302 http://www.bangshift.com/forum/forum...485-bbr-s-83gt
                              1973 F-250 BBF Turbo Truck http://www.bangshift.com/forum/forum...uck-conversion
                              1986 Ford Ranger EFI 545/C6 https://bangshift.com/forum/forum/ba...tooth-and-nail

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