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Fix up a car to sell it? or leave it as is?

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  • Fix up a car to sell it? or leave it as is?

    Looks like I might get a 65 mustang, to sell. It looked pretty nice 20 years ago, time has taken it's toll, the driver's side needs to be repainted (one rust hole, door dings, crazed paint), the interior is suffering from sun effects. Runs ok, drives ok, needs tires, and some TLC.

    Question...am I better off selling it as is, or dropping a grand and a couple weeks of work into it first? Wild guess it may go for 4k as is, 7k fixed up, but that's a wild guess based partly on what they sold for on ebay recently.
    Last edited by squirrel; September 23, 2013, 09:21 PM.
    My fabulous web page

    "If it don't go, chrome it!" --Stroker McGurk

  • #2
    You might fall in love with it and keep it like the 'Burb..

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    • #3
      Not likely. 2bbl 289, 3 speed, and it's rather uncomfortable to drive for me...sitting flat and using a clutch pedal and a crappy shifter doesn't do much for me.
      My fabulous web page

      "If it don't go, chrome it!" --Stroker McGurk

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      • #4
        427 and a blower and prove once again the fastest Fords have Chevy's in them

        I'd sell it as is if the rate of return for a month of work and a minimum of a grand input only ups the price $3k.
        Escaped on a technicality.

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        • #5
          Depends on how you value your time.

          $2,000 net before labor says fix it up. Again, depending on how you value your time.
          I'm still learning

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          • #6
            Originally posted by TheSilverBuick View Post
            427 and a blower and prove once again the fastest Fords have Chevy's in them
            that thought did cross my mind



            alas, it's not a fastback..
            Last edited by squirrel; September 23, 2013, 09:38 PM.
            My fabulous web page

            "If it don't go, chrome it!" --Stroker McGurk

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            • #7
              I enjoy seeing cars I owned being pampered because of the value I added to them. How close is this car to being a parts car?
              Doing it all wrong since 1966

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              • #8
                It's not a parts car, it's solid and restorable, but it's one of those cars that if you drop 10k into it it'll raise the value 5k maybe.

                I'm sure pictures would help you guys help me....but it's dark out right now....maybe in the morning.
                My fabulous web page

                "If it don't go, chrome it!" --Stroker McGurk

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                • #9
                  We've all seen what you can do in a month. That seems like it'd be worth more than 2K to me. I have to agree with Randal, the rate of return on the investment isn't high enough to take the risk (of the investment).
                  http://www.bangshift.com/forum/showt...n-block-wanted

                  http://www.bangshift.com/forum/showt...-Blue-Turd(le)

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                  • #10
                    I'm a few thousand miles from the right area.
                    My fabulous web page

                    "If it don't go, chrome it!" --Stroker McGurk

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                    • #11
                      I can see you putting some time into making sure it's clean and then sending it down the road... seems way too new for you to be working on.
                      Flying south, with a flock of bird dogs.

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                      • #12
                        Three letters... A/FX. Could be a what if car. What if Ford and Chevy experimented together. 427 Chevy meets early Mustang with straight axle front end. I normally wouldn't suggest that, but knowing what you can do with a car, Jim, I know you would do a nice period correct job. Or flip it for a buck and find a Nova, err Tempest.
                        Bakersfield, CA.

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                        • #13
                          During my years in the dealership I learned the Number One Rule of used car sales - people buy shiny. I'd do a quick paint job and fix any tears in the interior (I think interior work is cheap for the difference it makes in a car) and then flip it. Casper has a point - these guys seem to have a built-in fan base and I'll wager it's worth more shiny than you think it is, assuming it runs OK. If it needs paint AND interior AND a trans rebuild AND...... Well, that's another story.

                          Dan

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by squirrel View Post
                            I'm a few thousand miles from the right area.

                            but you are in the right area for Ebay.
                            Doing it all wrong since 1966

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                            • #15
                              Not really, early mustangs are a dime a dozen, and if the buyer has to buy sight unseen, as well as pay for shipping, there goes the "AZ car" bonus.

                              I think Dan may be right about "people buy shiny". It would cost about a grand for interior parts, paint is not very expensive if all I have to do is fix part of the body and I do the work myself.

                              If it was a fastback, then it would be worth something, as well as be a good af/x candidate.
                              My fabulous web page

                              "If it don't go, chrome it!" --Stroker McGurk

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