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Going to Bonneville - Speed Week August 10-16, 2019

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  • #16

    Re: Going to Bonneville - Speed Week August 10-16, 2019

    Bonneville is still a lake right now....
    http://meso1.chpc.utah.edu/station_c...am_current.jpg

    This camera takes a photo every now and then, and you can check it out whenever you want.
    Act your age, not your shoe size. - Prince

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    • #17

      Re: Going to Bonneville - Speed Week August 10-16, 2019

      Another crazy Canuk will be at the Salt again as the Zephyr is ready to go!!

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      • #18

        Re: Going to Bonneville - Speed Week August 10-16, 2019

        Excellent! See you there - let's do dinner one night.

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        • #19

          Re: Going to Bonneville - Speed Week August 10-16, 2019

          From what I've read, the salt was first used for speed races in 1912 and the first record in land speed was set in 1914.
          I wonder how that worked ?
          LSR didn't gain any real popularity until in the 1930s.

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          • #20

            Re: Going to Bonneville - Speed Week August 10-16, 2019

            Early auto makers used their top speed numbers as a selling tool - witness Ford's 999 with Barney Oldfield or Henry himself at the wheel. The raced on beaches, dry lakes, or anywhere else they could go flat out. While many of these early racers had nothing to do with their production cars but I guess the idea was that they were showing off their engineering skills.

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            • #21

              Re: Going to Bonneville - Speed Week August 10-16, 2019

              Early auto makers used their top speed numbers as a selling tool - witness Ford's 999 with Barney Oldfield or Henry himself at the wheel.
              Although he was a good businessman, as a person, Henry Ford was a dickhead.

              Henry Ford collaborated with bicycle racer Tom Cooper and a team of several assistants to create two similar racing cars. They had a huge 1,156 cu.in. inline-4 engine (7.25 inch bore and 7.0 inch stroke, producing from 70 to 100 horsepower), with a bare chassis, no bodywork, no rear suspension, no differential and steering was controlled by a crude pivoting metal bar, similar to a straight handlebar on a bicycle.

              When the cars had refused to start during a test drive two weeks before the first race, Ford sold his stake in them to Barney Oldfield and Cooper. Therefore, Ford abandoned his share of the racing money. But he still promoted the cars and enjoyed the publicity, which secured his image behind their eventual successes and the ensuing legend.

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              • #22

                Re: Going to Bonneville - Speed Week August 10-16, 2019

                Although he was a good businessman, as a person, Henry Ford was a dickhead.
                Oh I agree - Hank #1 was a first class jerk. My point was the top speed was used as a selling point for years. Look at Ab Jenkins and Auburn as another example.

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