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1975 Camino Royale

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  • Cammin
    replied
    Quick update: I will soon have a stock cam / lifter set and an intake manifold. My friend wants to add a slightly lumpy cam to his 350 and the manifold will be upgraded to a chrome piece. A classic 'parts for labor' swap. Yes, I'm keeping the cam safe until install (I'm thinking pipe foam insulation) and notating which lobe each lifter belongs with (18 count egg carton with sharpie numbers?) . All for now...

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  • Cammin
    replied
    http://bangshift.com/general-news/vi...heck-this-out/

    What do you think? The Camino already has the right patina...

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  • SuperBuickGuy
    replied
    everyone but GM... I like rustrepair.com - their stuff tends to be thicker and US stamped. That said, some fitting is required...

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  • Deaf Bob
    replied
    Any Malibu fitting pans will work... Or is it wagon only pans?

    Edit: wagon pans will have the spare tire hump behind the rear wheel on one side
    Last edited by Deaf Bob; November 17, 2015, 07:42 AM.

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  • Cammin
    replied
    Here's more rust pics and one with light streaming through the rusty holes. I'll be looking for replacement pans this winter, any suggestions for which manufacturer to use or stay away from?

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  • Cammin
    replied
    I finally got the Sonoma battery tray cleaned and painted. El Camino bed panel was removed and I did some minor damage assesment, with more in depth later (along with smuggler box removal) . I got help with the Camino bench seat removal and I plan to remove carpet/sound deadener soon.

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  • DanStokes
    replied
    I did my '88 F150 completely with bonded replacement panels as an experiment. A buddy and old BSer has the truck now and he says it's holding up pretty well though we're in NC and the truck is pretty much just used for dump runs and so on. The hard part is getting the old metal REALLY clean, especially tough if there is any sound deadener or the like on the back side of the panel. I used the Lord Flexor system mostly because the gun was cheaper. The adhesive is pricey and you'll go thru a ton of tips so but a lot of them. Also, buy all the clamps in the world - you'll need them!

    I have welding gear but I'd use bonding again if the situation called for it.

    Dan

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  • Cammin
    replied
    Cleaned and painted the battery tray and underlying wheel well. Up next, I plan to remove the seat and pull up the carpet/sound deadener to get a look at the floor board. I don't have a welder, so I'm considering the use of bonding adhesive with the patch panels. Any experiences to share about this type of repair?

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  • Cammin
    replied
    Originally posted by DanStokes View Post
    The battery in Mutt (the race truck) is of who-knows-what vintage. It was in the 300SD when I got it and I'm sure it wasn't new at that time. Still full charge.

    Dan
    It was never hooked up, so we will just wait and see. I forgot to mention that I replaced the battery cables prior to its shutdown.

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  • DanStokes
    replied
    The battery in Mutt (the race truck) is of who-knows-what vintage. It was in the 300SD when I got it and I'm sure it wasn't new at that time. Still full charge.

    Dan

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  • Cammin
    replied
    Finally finished the front brake hose replacement. I found a few items to slow me down: one rusty hard line nut, incorrect key placement on the section that mates to the hard lines, sticky copper shims. The tiny keys (one large and one small) were clocked wrong. It would have fit perfectly if placed in the opposite side of the mounting brace. Some filing took care of that issue. The copper shims were too small to fit onto the caliper bolt, so a little massaging with a file and drill bit took care of business.

    Next, I removed the battery tray and discovered a little surface rust. Oh well, I will just add that to the list. Here's the battery I purchased 11 years ago and it still looks brand new. What are the chances I can recharge it and simply use as is?

    Painted two wheels flat black to cover the nasty rust, a few days ago. I'll get to the other side this weekend.


    Here's to 'slow but sure wins the race'...
    Last edited by Cammin; October 14, 2015, 03:54 PM.

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  • 68scott385
    replied
    I haven't noticed any difference between the two but knowing the aged rubber lines are gone makes me feel better.

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  • Cammin
    replied
    Originally posted by 68scott385 View Post
    BRAIDED but I might be biased......I upgrade stuff like that whenever I have to replace/repair it. jmo/


    Braided wasn't an option when I did my "A" but was when I did my "B" a couple years ago.

    Cost and availability helped to narrow my decision. I already had the parts (from years ago), so I'm using them for now. It's definitely on the to-do list.

    I've never operated a vehicle with braided lines. How noticable is the difference from the driver's seat ?

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  • 68scott385
    replied
    BRAIDED but I might be biased......I upgrade stuff like that whenever I have to replace/repair it. jmo/


    Braided wasn't an option when I did my "A" but was when I did my "B" a couple years ago.
    Last edited by 68scott385; October 5, 2015, 11:48 PM.

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  • Cammin
    replied
    Thanks for the info folks. I'm working on the front brake hoses now and I will replace the rear soon. Here's a shot of the damage...

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