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1975 Camino Royale

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  • mlcraven
    replied
    I've always had a soft spot for the 73-77 El Caminos...the Battlestar Galactica of the pickup utility line. Good thing I've never come across a decent one for cheap -- wouldn't be able to resist I'm sure. Anyway, Elkys are coolness on the street...fully concur with keeping it daily driveable. May all your rusty bolts break free and your wiring harness be intact!

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  • 68scott385
    replied
    Originally posted by trukluvr View Post

    Sadly many consider it the ugliest of the El Caminos. I like the larger size to get my oversized tail into the cab. Plus they ride better than most other generations of the Camino.
    That's because they share the front suspension of the Gen2 Camaros as do the '78-'96 B-body cars according to a reputable source. (Savitske) He says their geometry is better than the earlier and later generations but it still has room for improvements.
    Last edited by 68scott385; October 2, 2015, 02:40 PM.

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  • trukluvr
    replied
    Originally posted by Cammin View Post

    I agree and I'm amazed that this generation doesn't typically get a lot of love.
    Sadly many consider it the ugliest of the El Caminos. I like the larger size to get my oversized tail into the cab. Plus they ride better than most other generations of the Camino.

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  • Cammin
    replied
    Originally posted by trukluvr View Post
    Love this generation of the Camino! Nice truck. I'm looking forward to the progress on this project.
    I agree and I'm amazed that this generation doesn't typically get a lot of love.
    Last edited by Cammin; September 29, 2015, 05:21 PM.

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  • Cammin
    replied
    Originally posted by Stewzer55 View Post
    I'm looking forward to the progress of this build, great story behind the Camino too.
    Thanks, slow but sure on this build.

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  • trukluvr
    replied
    Love this generation of the Camino! Nice truck. I'm looking forward to the progress on this project.

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  • yellomalibu
    replied
    Pedantics, Semantics... ok. I (mistakenly) call them all sway bars regardless of whether they are actually an anti-roll bar or whatever. I'm okay with that.

    I understand on the Chevelle / El Camino, et al, that the upper trailing arms are installed on an angle, each opposing the other, which centers the rear end under the car and prevents it from shifting side to side.
    The stock rear sway bar locations essentially join the lower trailing arms together... perhaps this could offer some lateral sway control, but I think that is a side effect - that the primary function is to keep the body from rolling when the car is experiencing lateral forces - usually in a turn.

    -what a sidetrack!

    My point, earlier, about the kits that are available is that they are designed to work together for optimum performance with each other. I could randomly buy springs that are too firm or soft, shocks that are too firm or soft, and sway bars that are too stiff or weak for the other components to work well together.

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  • Huskinhano
    replied
    Originally posted by Scott Liggett View Post
    The panhard has nothing to do with the anti-sway.
    Actually it does have some effect on anti roll. It comes from lateral forces. For instance, if the panhard is fastened to the chassis on the left side and right side of the axle, in a left turn the panhard is going to apply downward forces on the axle forcing it away from the body. The right rear is going to more load on it. Left turn, it will unload the right rear which will let the body fall and level out. Raising and lowering the mounting location on the axle will alter the loads as well as roll center

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  • Stewzer55
    replied
    I'm looking forward to the progress of this build, great story behind the Camino too.

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  • Scott Liggett
    replied
    65-70 B bodies had panhards with either the 3 or 4 link set up. 4 link was for F41 heavy duty suspension. The trailing arms are parallel, hence the need for a panhard bar. All of the A bodies had triangulated four link set so a pan hard was not necessary. The panhard has nothing to do with the anti-sway. Just centers the rear diff. Bob, the '71 and up B bodies you derby guys covet had triangulated rear links as well.

    73-77 A bodies and Monte Carlos handle great, but many came with a rear sway bar. They are interchangeable. Most every Monte I have seen has them. I snagged one off a '76 Monte and installed it on my '70 Caprice.

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  • Deaf Bob
    replied
    Originally posted by STINEY View Post
    I believe the B-bodies got panhards, but the A & G platforms didn't.
    3 or 4 link is the difference, I believe.. None of th Caprices and Impalas as well as full sized oes had them that we derbied..

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  • STINEY
    replied
    I believe the B-bodies got panhards, but the A & G platforms didn't.

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  • Shelty
    replied
    is there not one on the elco? I thought GM used the PHB on most of its coil sprung cars back then? I know my wagon's got one.

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  • STINEY
    replied
    Originally posted by SuperBuickGuy View Post
    The difference is the sway bar ties the lower control arms together to keep the rear from moving side to side under the frame.
    I have to play pedantic too.

    How does the sway bar keep the rear from moving side to side under the frame when its only attachment points are on the control arms (which are attached to the axle, which kinda indexes them to each other already)

    I can only see the rear sway bar controlling anti-roll. Unless a panhard bar is incorporated also.

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  • SuperBuickGuy
    replied
    mr. pedantic here...sway bar for the rear, anti-roll bar for the front... to my knowledge there is no such thing as a sway bar for the front end. The difference is the sway bar ties the lower control arms together to keep the rear from moving side to side under the frame. It also provides some anti-roll, but its chief function is sway control - so that the rear doesn't get momentum the instant you turn and cause oversteer.

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