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1975 Camino Royale

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  • yellomalibu
    replied
    Yep... first, rebuilt/ replace anything that needs it. The poly bushings firm things up a bit, but still have some give - they are a decent upgrade if you are rebuilding your front end for only a little more cost.

    sway bars - front and rear. Huge difference in feel.

    Springs and shocks. So many options ... companies make kits if you want to go that route. Eibach is one of them. There is even a kit that includes front and rear sway bars, so price stuff before buying.

    And the inserts for boxing the lower rear trailing arms are a must for installing a rear sway bar. They support the sway bar where the bolt goes through so over-tightening of the mounting bolts doesn't compress the trailing arm. Some welding is required. Here's what they look like: https://www.opgi.com/chevelle/RCAI001/

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  • Deaf Bob
    replied
    Sway bars will give the biggest bang for the buck..
    Trans Am, Camaros have pretty good ones.. Easy to add,
    Same for 77ishy Cougars-LTD's. Have one on my 57 Sedan Delivery.. Can barely get my hand between tire and fender and it never rubs.
    Coil sprung rears have holes in the control arms in back for sway bars.. There is also a wavy plate that helps stiffen the arms.. I would rather add square tube and drill the holes.. There is some width variations.. Measure!

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  • SuperBuickGuy
    replied
    poly front bushings, rebuild the rear bars, box the rear bars, add a sway-bar to the rear if it doesn't have one, a thicker front anti-roll bar, higher-rate springs front and rear, lower the car, and add the best shocks you can afford.
    Last edited by SuperBuickGuy; September 23, 2015, 10:57 AM.

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  • Cammin
    replied
    I'm planning to daily drive this vehicle when finished. I want to be able to cruise with comfort and turn without its normal tendency to sway back and forth. The majority of time I will drive it around town, while cruising highways and back roads on the weekends. I can put up with a less cushy ride, but I don't want to lose any fillings either. I'm not currently looking to drag race it consistently, nor am I planning to make it a canyon carver. With that being said, what recommendations do you have for me (in regards to rebuilding the suspension)?

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  • yellomalibu
    replied
    Originally posted by Cammin View Post

    All right, I'll bite. How do you know these things? :/
    The short answer: experience.

    The story:
    My car would twist so hard when it launched, it wouldn't leave straight. I had my stock upper trailing arms boxed and had nuts welded inside for the new rod-ends to go into. Home made adjustable uppers. After shortening them to adjust my pinion angle, which didn't seem to help, I tried to preload the rearend like my buddy's dragster. It helped! However, inside a year, my Auburn posi stopped being a posi. I had to do the right tire burnout, then when it stuck, had to do the left tire burnout. I know now that doing 1 wheel burnouts puts crazy amounts of friction on the inside of the gears that ride on the cross pin. Not advised to do this. Replaced the posi with a better one: a Moroso Brute Strength. It, too, wore out in about a year. - I was still driving it on the street at this time -
    The next year I put a spool in the car. It was becoming a race-only car, so why not? My first trip to the track with the spool was scary. The rear of the car went to the side it was aiming, then it would slip and go back the other direction, repeat until I lifted. It felt like the rearend was flopping around back there or driving a forklift with sloppy steering at full speed. I aborted the pass, tried again, and the same thing happened. I put the car on the trailer for the night. I JUST had it painted, and didn't want to crash it. Yeah, a little crazy showing up at the drag strip with a new paint job and first pass (ever) with a spool.

    When I got the car home, I put it on jackstands and pulled the rear wheels and broke out the tape measure. The right (passenger) side of the axle was 5/16" further forward than the left side.

    There are plenty of well documented ways to make a car leave straight without much twist... They cost more than a simple adjustment to an upper trailing arm, but they are worth it.
    Last edited by yellomalibu; September 21, 2015, 04:53 PM.

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  • Cammin
    replied
    Originally posted by yellomalibu View Post
    On adjustable upper rear trailing arms. Don't try to pre-load the suspension like a true 4 link car does. If they aren't equal lengths, they WILL cause the rearend to be crooked, meaning one side will be further forward than the other side. This, may help a car that twists and flexes when it launches to launch straight, it will wear out a posi unit very fast, and if you have a spool, it will cause a very scary and unsafe "rear stear" situation.
    ...ask me how I know these things.
    All right, I'll bite. How do you know these things? :/

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  • Cammin
    replied
    Originally posted by 68scott385 View Post
    http://www.amazon.com/How-Make-Your-...our+car+handle


    How to Hook & Launch: Traction Mods for Street & Strip (Performance How to) [Miller, Dick] on Amazon.com. *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. How to Hook & Launch: Traction Mods for Street & Strip (Performance How to)



    Here's two that, imo, are worth the money. The first one contains a plethora of information on several suspension styles and covers stock systems and modifications to go full pro-touring or anywhere in between. The second one focuses on modifications for drag racing. If you don't plan on drag racing it probably won't be worth the money or time to read.

    Thanks for the information. I thought I recognized the name on the first book. Sean Rich (http://bangshift.com/bangshiftapex/f...s-pro-touring/) suggested that I speak with the same guy. It's a small world after all.

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  • yellomalibu
    replied
    On adjustable upper rear trailing arms. Don't try to pre-load the suspension like a true 4 link car does. If they aren't equal lengths, they WILL cause the rearend to be crooked, meaning one side will be further forward than the other side. This, may help a car that twists and flexes when it launches to launch straight, it will wear out a posi unit very fast, and if you have a spool, it will cause a very scary and unsafe "rear stear" situation.
    ...ask me how I know these things.
    Last edited by yellomalibu; September 20, 2015, 06:05 PM.

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  • 68scott385
    replied
    How to Make Your Muscle Car Handle: Revised Edition [Savitske, Mark] on Amazon.com. *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. How to Make Your Muscle Car Handle: Revised Edition



    How to Hook & Launch: Traction Mods for Street & Strip (Performance How to) [Miller, Dick] on Amazon.com. *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. How to Hook & Launch: Traction Mods for Street & Strip (Performance How to)



    Here's two that, imo, are worth the money. The first one contains a plethora of information on several suspension styles and covers stock systems and modifications to go full pro-touring or anywhere in between. The second one focuses on modifications for drag racing. If you don't plan on drag racing it probably won't be worth the money or time to read.

    Leave a comment:


  • Cammin
    replied
    Originally posted by 68scott385 View Post
    There are a few recently (10 years or less) published books that cover GMs triangulated four-link rear suspension system and how to improve it depending on your planned usage, if you are interested in doing more reading/research before making a final decision.
    Sounds like a good idea, thanks.

    Update: I got my jack stands today and I plan to have the Camino in the air this week.

    Leave a comment:


  • 68scott385
    replied
    There are a few recently (10 years or less) published books that cover GMs triangulated four-link rear suspension system and how to improve it depending on your planned usage, if you are interested in doing more reading/research before making a final decision.

    Leave a comment:


  • Cammin
    replied
    "while McGann a Car Craft's build wasn't low-buck, he did point out issues and ideas for solutions. "

    Here is the closest match I could find...

    " In the rear, the G-plus package does a couple of important things. The adjustable upper control arms allow you to set or reset your pinion angle without removing the arm from the car. Drag racers know that the pinion angle is key to getting the car out of the hole at the dragstrip, and the same is true for getting it out of a corner. The uppers also control the lateral movement of the differential that blows out the stock bushings. The adjustable uppers use a spherical bearing that allows the rearend to move without binding. The lowers use a Del-a-lum bushing on the differential side to control lateral movement and a spherical bearing on the frame side, so there is no bind as the bars travel through their arc. There is also a set of rear frame supports that ties the control arm to the factory crossmember to stabilize the upper mounts and prevent them from being broken when you nail the gas pedal. All these things add up to a rearend that doesn't bind or wander. Stability here correlates to a controllable car in the corners. "

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  • Cammin
    replied
    Originally posted by SuperBuickGuy View Post
    spend some quality time googling other people's builds - while McGann a Car Craft's build wasn't low-buck, he did point out issues and ideas for solutions. Believe it or not, the suspension under your car is pretty good and can be made to handle on a pretty limited budget. What got me to comment, though, is your idea of poly. For the front suspension, that is fine, but poly only works well in 2 dimensions so the rear arms, when they twist, will have issues and make the handling unpredictable.
    Thanks for the tip, I've never considered the dimensional constraints of the polyurethane. I'll check out McGann's build for sure.

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  • SuperBuickGuy
    replied
    spend some quality time googling other people's builds - while McGann a Car Craft's build wasn't low-buck, he did point out issues and ideas for solutions. Believe it or not, the suspension under your car is pretty good and can be made to handle on a pretty limited budget. What got me to comment, though, is your idea of poly. For the front suspension, that is fine, but poly only works well in 2 dimensions so the rear arms, when they twist, will have issues and make the handling unpredictable.

    Leave a comment:


  • Beagle
    replied
    I've done the front ends of several Ford trucks with the 12 ton. I'm with Dan in almost wishing I had bought the 20 ton but it's all good. The press works fine. The frame is more substantial on the 20 ton and thinking about it after purchase, I think the work height was more comfortable with the bigger press.

    The trick on the GM A-arms is getting support in between the edges so they don't collapse or pinch the bushing on it's way in or out - what Scott is talking about. I had hell the first side I did on a '72 Elco. A visit to the local scrap steel place for some "coupons" of varying thicknesses, maybe 1/8, 1/4, 3/8 at a minimum and several inches in stack height, and some schedule 80 pipe of various diameters and lengths from maybe 2" - 6" and a couple of different heights of 4 to 8 inches or so will make life with a press a lot more fun.

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