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  • TheSilverBuick
    replied
    Assembled the board tonight! I didn't solder the blue pill (processor chip) to the board, I'm going to pick up a socket for it incase I brick or short the blue pill loading in firmware or in event of mis-wiring (or goofing up the current sensor signal...) I'll be able to quickly swap in another chip. I need to make two smaller signal processing boards, I've got a digi-key cart full of parts for them, but I'm going out of town until the end of the month so the order will have to wait until then.



    I also got the motor mostly bolted in. I need to double check that the motor is square to the frame then drill the final holes in the rear support frame and lock it down, then make the shaft end bearing supports.

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  • TheSilverBuick
    replied
    Got all the pieces to assemble to primary control board. About $60 in parts including the PCB board. This board alone unfortunately will not run the type of electric motor I got, so I have bought another sensor board the supplement this one to get all the inputs I need. That board cost me $25 after shipping, and will have to buy probably $10 in parts. However, with the basic board I should be able to run the modified alternator as a motor without issue.

    Starting my EV conversion control like I started my move to EFI, with a solder together "Science Fair" of a project

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  • TheSilverBuick
    replied
    I did some more brake system mock up. I'm going to be brake hose length limited so I need to bolt in the MGR unit first then mount the master cylinders in a place that the brake lines can reach the calipers. That being said, I made one brake rod which if I have to either cut down or make a new longer one, that'd be okay, but I wanted to be certain that this would work.

    This is roughly where the master cylinders should end up, but the MGR will move forward (and upwards) some, so I may move the master cylinders forward accordingly, or not. What I also need to find is brake fluid resistant hose for the reservoirs. I'll get a tee fitting and single reservoir for the two cylinders.



    In action. I'll have a real return spring mounted on the system when it's all together. One that will probably apply the brakes some so if the controls are let go of it'll slow down more than the motor drag. I haven't decided if I'm going to have the motor regen "brake" when the throttle is let up, or use the old throttle control as a regen "engine brake" control.


    And as I'm getting parts together for the electrical side of it. I want to be able to test the inverter performance and learn a little bit of tuning without risking shorting out the MGR unit, so I dug out one my old internally regulated alternators and gutted the regulator parts out and in theory should be able to run this as a motor using the Toyota inverter. If I short it out I have a few more stacked up, lol.

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  • Dan Barlow
    replied
    That just looks fantastic ! Looks like it should have been made thst way .

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  • TheSilverBuick
    replied
    Ha, the thing is from the 80's, I'm not sure how much I would trust it "floating" even with the gas engine Well there is always Flex Seal!

    A little more mock up. I removed the jackshaft and it seems it's #60 chain and not #50 so I need to get new sprockets. The calipers clear the chain by barely, but enough not to worry about. I will probably mount the MGR where it sits here. Any more forward and it gets into the seat area.

    I will likely make a cross bracket that utilizes the existing side bolt holes on the frame to the vertical mounting holes on the MGR. The brake caliper hoses bolt right to the master cylinders I bought,but come up short connecting them directly to the control sticks.


    So moving the master cylinders back, I'll modify the shafts originally connected to the control sticks to reach the master cylinders now tucked under the seat area.



    The calipers clearing the brakes. Even with vertical chain "slap" it should not hit the calipers. Now just a matter of building the caliper brackets.



    An overview of the setup.
    Last edited by TheSilverBuick; July 25, 2020, 09:50 PM.

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  • Dan Barlow
    replied
    Originally posted by TheSilverBuick View Post
    I put the transmission back together and was never happy with the band adjustments. Certainly not happy enough to really do much else with the finicky 2-stroke engine, so it sat until recently. I've decided to convert this to electric. Ditch the 2-stroke and the transmission at the same time. Initially I was looking for a pair of cheap electric golf carts to run a motor on each side, which would require two of everything, controller, direction controller, etc. But the cost kept me from really moving forward with it. Figuring it would be at minimum around $900 plus batteries for ~10-16HP worth of power. Then I came across a Toyota rear axle electric drive motor (MGR - Motor Generator Rear) that could be had for $100!

    For $100 I'd get a ~68HP electric motor coupled to an open differential. Figured using some disc brakes and pair of master cylinders I could modulate power left and right similar to how people do it on dune buggies in the sand. With this research I found a group working on using Toyota Prius inverters to run about any kind of electric motor, at least upwards 150HP worth of control. The controller is still very much a work in progress and reminds me of Megasquirt in the early early days, before I even started with it. So it'll be a challenge. Anyways, I picked up two Toyota inverters, a Gen2 and Gen3, each for $50. I'm going to attempt to build the cheapest controller option for sub-$100 but may end up purchasing a more assembled, nearly plug and play kit for around $350. We'll see! I will still have to sort out a battery to use, but bonus is the Toyota inverter can be used to fast charge batteries as well. A neat package.

    So I yanked out the drivetrain and fuel tank and set the MGR and Gen2 inverter in there to see how it looks. The Gen3 inverter is a bit smaller if I use it.




    So I sketched out a plan to run some shafts from the MGR, with some brake rotors on it and use a pair of master cylinders on the control levers. I just mocked up the setup today.


    And how it looks. I plan on cutting out some of the old transmission brackets and slide the whole thing forward. The chain will run from a 10-tooth sprocket to the middle axle directly (middle chain) and get rid of the upper jack shaft. Using a 1998 Kawasaki Ninja front brake setup was the cheapest route I could find on E-bay.






    So what could go wrong going from a peaky ~20-30HP engine to an instantaneous 68HP power plant???
    Or she starts taking on water in a swamp / marsh crossing and you get electrocuted. People will talk about you forever .

    Leave a comment:


  • DanStokes
    replied
    Sounds like you have the powertrain resolved but an FYI - my buddy David, the guy who now owns the former Burke Brothers Avanti, owns the golf cart dealership in Waynesville, NC. I have no clue what he has in his bone yard but if you need any of that kind of stuff PM me and I'll put you two in contact.

    Dan

    Leave a comment:


  • TheSilverBuick
    replied
    Haha, yeah snap all six axles at once I have it so geared down the motor should top out at 25mph, so all the mechanical advantage with the 10-tooth sprockets. Pending how it drives one of the first changes will probably be getting a higher tooth count to bring the motor rpms down and limit top speed in the software.

    I've got several months I think before I get this mobile, do been watching for a cheap battery(ies) to pop up on the local market place. I'm thinking I'll probably initially use a NiMH battery with 1-2 kwh worth of power to putt around the yard and prove it works. If I have fun using it around the yard I'll spring for some good lithium batteries.

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  • Beagle
    replied
    If the axles live, and the 200 plus volts worth of battery you're sitting on doesn't catch fire? Nothing! Batteryhookup.com has some BMW battery modules for kind of cheap right now.... of course, you will want a flexible PV panel on a bimini top right?
    Last edited by Beagle; July 25, 2020, 05:36 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • TheSilverBuick
    replied
    I put the transmission back together and was never happy with the band adjustments. Certainly not happy enough to really do much else with the finicky 2-stroke engine, so it sat until recently. I've decided to convert this to electric. Ditch the 2-stroke and the transmission at the same time. Initially I was looking for a pair of cheap electric golf carts to run a motor on each side, which would require two of everything, controller, direction controller, etc. But the cost kept me from really moving forward with it. Figuring it would be at minimum around $900 plus batteries for ~10-16HP worth of power. Then I came across a Toyota rear axle electric drive motor (MGR - Motor Generator Rear) that could be had for $100!

    For $100 I'd get a ~68HP electric motor coupled to an open differential. Figured using some disc brakes and pair of master cylinders I could modulate power left and right similar to how people do it on dune buggies in the sand. With this research I found a group working on using Toyota Prius inverters to run about any kind of electric motor, at least upwards 150HP worth of control. The controller is still very much a work in progress and reminds me of Megasquirt in the early early days, before I even started with it. So it'll be a challenge. Anyways, I picked up two Toyota inverters, a Gen2 and Gen3, each for $50. I'm going to attempt to build the cheapest controller option for sub-$100 but may end up purchasing a more assembled, nearly plug and play kit for around $350. We'll see! I will still have to sort out a battery to use, but bonus is the Toyota inverter can be used to fast charge batteries as well. A neat package.

    So I yanked out the drivetrain and fuel tank and set the MGR and Gen2 inverter in there to see how it looks. The Gen3 inverter is a bit smaller if I use it.




    So I sketched out a plan to run some shafts from the MGR, with some brake rotors on it and use a pair of master cylinders on the control levers. I just mocked up the setup today.


    And how it looks. I plan on cutting out some of the old transmission brackets and slide the whole thing forward. The chain will run from a 10-tooth sprocket to the middle axle directly (middle chain) and get rid of the upper jack shaft. Using a 1998 Kawasaki Ninja front brake setup was the cheapest route I could find on E-bay.






    So what could go wrong going from a peaky ~20-30HP engine to an instantaneous 68HP power plant???

    Leave a comment:


  • Deaf Bob
    replied
    Cool project..

    Leave a comment:


  • TheSilverBuick
    replied
    FINALLY got the drum machined. Had a few shops flat decline to do it and one say 10 weeks before they could get to it before I found one that said one to two weeks. It's just about back together then I'll get it plopped back into the Max.

    Leave a comment:


  • TheSilverBuick
    replied
    Project creep. I was looking at getting a new band to replace the one that was twisted up and lost some friction material, then was looking at all the bands in detail and another one has a rough spot on it, and the cost of two new bands is around $180 +tax+shipping. The folks on the 6x6 forum recommend sending the bands in for re-lining at $35 a band, which is reasonable, but one is twisted up/damaged so no go. Here is where project creep comes in, Alto's Products had a set of 4 on E-bay for $320, and I checked their website and it was listed in their clearance section so I made an offer for $250 and we eventually agreed to $295 and free shipping, and sans tax. More than I wanted to spend but over all saved around $65 and shipping and tax, so a small win.

    I'm still looking for a shop to machine the one drum down, seems all the local auto shops around my house don't have a conventional lathe for cutting rotors and drums but a fancy machine that just does rotors and drums for the few times they actually cut them. So when I get it back together it'll be pretty much new and I now have a bit over $1,000 tied up into the max, but this "should be" the last large expense until I decide I need tires or such.

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  • TheSilverBuick
    replied
    The good drum(left) arrived today. I still have to see about getting the other one surfaced smooth.

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  • TheSilverBuick
    replied
    We have no shop here. The bad drum would be really really thin by the time it would be cut smooth. The other one that I've yet to take anywhere I think will clean up with minimal work, and is overall casted much thicker.

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