Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

1939 Chevy coupe

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16

    Re: 1939 Chevy coupe

    Brown truck arrived, and dropped off my disc brakes!



    Comment


    • #17

      Re: 1939 Chevy coupe

      Excellent project! I normally object to putting SBCs in everything but hey, this IS a Chevy in a Chevy so the only thing that would be better is a 409. I'll stay tuned.

      I've done a ton of rust work (comes from living in MI for most of my life) and I get a lot of satisfaction from making something that's wiggly and ugly all smooth and pretty. Hope you're able to enjoy it, too.

      Dan
      Last edited by DanStokes; September 7th, 2019, 09:47 AM.

      Comment


      • #18

        Re: 1939 Chevy coupe

        Excellent project! I normally object to putting SBCs in everything but hey, this IS a Chevy in a Chevy so the only thing that would be better is a 409. I'll stay tuned.

        I've done a ton of rust work (comes from living in MI for most of my life) and I get a lot of satisfaction from making something that's wiggly and ugly all smooth and pretty. Hope you're able to enjoy it, too.

        Dan
        I wish I could say I enjoyed doing it? But really I enjoy that I'm done doing it! It is satisfying as each panel gets done and it becomes more and more solid. Just not much fun.
        I'll be a happy camper as I begin the rest of the build from here on out!

        Comment


        • #19

          Re: 1939 Chevy coupe

          Installed the oil pump and pickup today. Checked the height, and then tossed a tack on it to hold it.



          Painted the axle and calipers with Hammerite dark silver. Almost a bare metal color, and I like it. Then assembled the disc brakes and checked the clearances with the wheels.





          A good solid inch clearance from the closest point from caliper to rim.

          Cut piece of 2" box tubing and tacked it across the top of the frame rails to hold everything once I pull the crossmember out.


          It will get a permanent crossmember up front once I mount the axle and know where the crossmember should go.
          Last edited by 1946Austin; September 8th, 2019, 01:39 PM.
          Deaf Bob likes this.

          Comment


          • #20

            Re: 1939 Chevy coupe

            Long day today, as I was under the cowl looking at mounting points when I spotted still more rust I'd missed! It isn't visible, structural, or really a problem. But it was rusted metal, and needed to be addressed. And it was on both sides, once I saw one and looked at the other.
            The toe boards angle back, but the cowl goes straight down to the frame. The bottom of both cowls were rotted, and I had to cut them out and weld in new metal today. About 3 hours per side, but they're done. Hopefully the last of the rust, as I inspected the underside end to end and didn't see anything else.
            So maybe I can get back on drivetrain now.
            Deaf Bob, DanStokes and SuperBuickGuy like this.

            Comment


            • #21

              Re: 1939 Chevy coupe

              Great project. It's a lot of work but will be worth it in the end...plus the memories I'm sure it will bring back!

              Comment


              • #22

                Re: 1939 Chevy coupe

                Bit the bullet and whacked the axle in half. Then took a 4" piece off the top of one half, and another 4" piece off the bottom of the other half. Overlapped the two joints and ground all the edges to a knife edge for deep penetration. Clamped a piece of 1.5" tubing in the side of the beam, and another piece of 2" box across the spring perches. That lined both sides and top up perfectly until I could put as many tacks on as possible.





                After the tacking, I pulled just the box tube off and welded up top and bottom joints on the outside. Then I pulled the round tube and welded inside the web everywhere else. I could see as I flipped the axle over that the welds penetrated from the other side, so that ensured I got good welds.

                On the bottom side I left the weld slightly high, since nobody can see that area. Could have left it even higher, but it wont increase strength.



                Inside the web I got the die grinder out and ground the welds even on the front side, but left the back slightly high also, since it wont be seen either.



                Gave it all another coat of paint, and reinstalled the springs.





                My frame measures 29" wide at the rear mounting point, and 28" wide at the front. Another 3/4" lip added to the full edge also. My spring spacing is 28" at the rear, and 27" front, so it sits under the frame rails perfectly now. It also is 67" OA width to the sidewalls of the tires. So with my 70" fender OA width, the tires will sit in 1.5" inside! Exactly where I wanted everything to sit.
                This will really make installing the front axle a bunch easier, and not require any spring mounts to be built outside the frame rails either! Gotta make a trip to the steel yard and pick up material to build all the mounts now.
                BFXJason, oletrux4evr and 3 others like this.

                Comment


                • #23

                  Re: 1939 Chevy coupe

                  Unbolted the last 4 bolts on the front crossmember, and pulled it out from under the car this morning. Then loaded it into my SUburban, along with the radiator support, grille divider, steering column, tires and wheels, and the brake parts off the Chevy pickup axle. Took them over to Joe at Old Car Parts and he gave me $250 store credit! So while I was there I got the window channels for both doors, the whiskers for garnish molding, driver's side turn signal housing, and the weatherstripping for the windshield. I took the remaining credit for later, as I'm sure I'll need other bits.
                  Then swung by the steel yard and got some box tubing for the front spring mounts. 2" for the front spring eyes to fit inside of, and 1.5" for the rear to attach the shackles to. I needed the 1.25" x .125" DOM round tube to build my tie rod and drag link also, so got a 20' stick of that too. Was going to get a 10' stick, but another 10' was only $15 more, so silly to buy 10' for $50 when 20' is $65.

                  Mocked up the straight axle under the frame, just to see what the difference would be front to back to get 7 degrees of kingpin angle, and it came out as 4.5" at the rear. So with 3" shackle centers I just need a 1.5" drop off the frame. Front will only need 1" drop, so it will allow my mounts to stay pretty close to the frame.



                  I realized I had installed one spring backwards to the other, but figured they were the same. They weren't. Same distance to the eyes, but one short leaf is longer on one end, so reversed it to correct before I got too far along.



                  Threw on a pair of old Ford pattern rollers, but the center is too small, and only able to get about 4 threads before I ran out. My Torq Thrust fit fine, as they have larger centers to fit.

                  Deaf Bob and DanStokes like this.

                  Comment


                  • #24

                    Re: 1939 Chevy coupe

                    Swap meet parts reworked to use for my front shackles. Whenever I see these big old honkin rear shackles at a swap meet for a buck or two I buy them. I cut the bottom three holes off and they will be the shorter shackles for my front springs.



                    Made up some plates and mounts for the fixed end of the spring eye from flat plate.



                    Rear mount for the shackles is 1.5" heavy wall box that will get welded to another plate, and gussets added to the rear edge for more support. I'll tack it all to the plate, and together. Then I'll pull it off and do the final welding off the car. Made the plates large enough to hang outside the frame slightly, so I wont need to do much overhead welding.



                    Tomorrow I need to get back into electrician mode and wire a dedicated circuit out to the shop. I've been lazy and just using the outside plugs on the back of the house. But the outside plug shares a breaker with other things and I keep tripping it with my welder. So I'll go buy some pipe, wire, and a breaker, and install a dedicated circuit to feed the shop outlets. It's a pain to stop and got into the house to reset a breaker when I'm in the middle of a weld project and running higher amps. It never trips on lower settings, so didn't have an issue with the body panels.
                    But I hate having to buy electrical parts I used to get for free when I was working!

                    Comment


                    • #25

                      Re: 1939 Chevy coupe

                      Wiring my shop a few years ago was a Big Deal but it's been so worth it ever since. I have 100 amps out there and haven't blown a breaker since I set up the shop - maybe 12+ years ago. And that's with the AC, compressor, and who knows how many smaller tools plugged in though I don't run the compressor and the MIG at the same time.


                      Dan

                      Comment


                      • #26

                        Re: 1939 Chevy coupe

                        Wiring my shop a few years ago was a Big Deal but it's been so worth it ever since. I have 100 amps out there and haven't blown a breaker since I set up the shop - maybe 12+ years ago. And that's with the AC, compressor, and who knows how many smaller tools plugged in though I don't run the compressor and the MIG at the same time.


                        Dan
                        It's like the shoemaker's kids Dan. I spent almost 40 years as an electrician, and my little one car garage has a 20 amp single circuit that it shares with my wife's washing machine! I have a Miller 140 welder, and a drill press, belt sander, bandsaw, and a few angle grinders. But I never run any two tools at the same time.
                        The issue has been the washing machine, and my wife forgetting to not run it when I'm out in the shop welding. But I can't blame her since the washer was here first, and I robbed part of the circuit to install an outside outlet to feed the shop. So I'll add the 30 a. circuit out there, and be plenty for my needs. (for now) At least it will get this project going without trips to the basement to reset a breaker!

                        Comment


                        • #27

                          Re: 1939 Chevy coupe

                          I was nervous about wiring the welder and the compressor. If I had your background I would have calculated the needs and probably would have done it differently. But I'm a homeowner hack so I put the compressor on a dryer plug (I think it's 40 amp but I'd have to look) and made a long, VERY heavy duty extension cord for the welder with a matching plug. So when I'm welding I unplug the compressor and plug in the extension and the welder and have at it. Slightly inconvenient but it works perfectly and the compressor can't kick on in the middle of a weld.

                          Dan
                          Deaf Bob likes this.

                          Comment


                          • #28

                            Re: 1939 Chevy coupe

                            I was nervous about wiring the welder and the compressor. If I had your background I would have calculated the needs and probably would have done it differently. But I'm a homeowner hack so I put the compressor on a dryer plug (I think it's 40 amp but I'd have to look) and made a long, VERY heavy duty extension cord for the welder with a matching plug. So when I'm welding I unplug the compressor and plug in the extension and the welder and have at it. Slightly inconvenient but it works perfectly and the compressor can't kick on in the middle of a weld.

                            Dan
                            I have a brand new big upright compresssor sitting in another storage building here, but I use air tools so infrequently it hasn't even been used in probably 7-8 years.
                            I wired a new plug for the shop today, and installed an outlet to feed it. Used 30a. #10 ga. wire to feed it, just so there's no voltage drop or resistance loss. Shouldn't have any more nuisance tripping when the welder is cranked up full now.
                            One of these days I'll run a 220v. circuit out to the shop and install a small 10-12 circuit panel inside to feed whatever I might want. But this will get me through until then. I was a little irritated at having to pay for the breaker, wire, EMT, fittings, etc. today. When I was working this would have cost me zero to do. I always had leftover materials in my van from jobs and no reason to buy them. But even with my veteran's discount it cost me $65 from Home Depot for a lousy 30' of EMT, the fittings, wire, breaker, and outside box, etc. Of course HD gouges everyone on Sq. D QO breakers. They show them online for under $5, but the price in store is $19. Not sure how that crap works?
                            Last edited by 1946Austin; September 17th, 2019, 02:54 PM.

                            Comment


                            • #29

                              Re: 1939 Chevy coupe

                              Tack welded the mounts to the base plates, and then removed them from the car to weld them right side up. Cleaned up the shackles and bolted it all together again. Then tacked all four base plates to the frame with a single tack on each corner. Nothing permanent in case I need to adjust once the rear axle is done, and engine weight is on the suspension. Then if it's all still good I can permanently weld it up.
                              But it's sitting on the tires now, and ready for me to move to the rear suspension. Having a heck of a time figuring out how the rear shackles come apart? They have a single bolt in the middle hole, but when I removed it nothing seems to want to come apart. I pried and beat on the shackles, but they seem to be pressed on the top and bottom shafts. Those shafts are hollow and have zerk fittings. Removed the fittings, but no joy. Have to do some internet searching and then go caveman on them if I can't figure out how to gently remove them.



                              Also got the permanent front crossmember tacked in. Made it from some round tube I had leftover from the '63 Falcon build. Looks better than box tubing up front.




                              On a side note. Amazing how much better my Miller Mig welds now with a heavy circuit feeding it! The welds are better than it's ever done before!
                              Deaf Bob and STINEY like this.

                              Comment


                              • #30

                                Re: 1939 Chevy coupe

                                Thanks to a Google search I found an online copy of the 1939 Chevy shop manual! It shows the rear shackles are tapered pins on each end, and they simply hold the shackle with the taper, and that single center bolt.
                                I'll make up a piece of running thread with a nut on each end so I can put it between the shackles to push them apart. Then with tension on them I should be able to give them a good strike with the hammer and pop them free.

                                http://chevy.oldcarmanualproject.com.../39csm090.html
                                Deaf Bob likes this.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X