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1939 Chevy coupe

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  • 1946Austin
    replied
    My valve noise came back on the 350 SBC engine. Tried adjusting the lash again, but it just wont go away. Almost sounds like a bad valve, or broken valve spring, but I doubt it's either after today.
    I pulled the valve covers again, and did a compression check, and all are within 5psi of 150 psi with best around 153 psi, and lowest 148 psi. On a stone cold motor with my compression it's great. Did a bleed down test on all cylinders, but everything held fine.
    Pulled the rockers off and checked all rockers, and all valve stem ends, and no issues. #6 cyl. is the culprit, so I pressurized that cylinder and pulled the valve springs to check for broken springs, but no problems there either. The next step is to pull the intake and check the roller lifters to see if anything is wrong visibly. I've got a new set of Elgin roller lifters, so regardless of what I find I'll put them in while I've got the intake off.
    Baffling so far, and I actually hope I do find a lifter issue, just so I can feel better about reassembly. I did find one tiny thing that disappointed me with the machine shop that built my heads. On #6 exhaust valve I found a old cheap ass valve stem seal that was one of the single spring reddish colored seals. Intake had a nice new blue seal with double springs. I removed the cheap one and replaced it with a good one from a gasket set I had here. Have to check all the others with a flashlight, and see if I find any more he cheaped out on, and didn't use good seals on.
    I'm questioning whether I got the high performance .550 high lift valve springs now. I've got a full set of .550" springs, so I'm going to pressurize each cylinder and swap out the springs regardless. Just to make sure my issue isn't spring bind that could lead to other problems later. My cam is .525" lift, which is too much if he used stock OEM type springs. Hate having to fix things I paid others to do already!

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  • 1946Austin
    replied
    Got an early start before it got too hot today. Wanted to finish up some loose ends on the interior work. I got my weatherstrip material in the mail, so installed that along the door opening edge. Pretty easy since it's self adhesive, and just needed to clean the edge and pull the tape backer off and stick it down.



    Then I got the 30 ft. of windlace and began the process of installing it also. The '39 has channels it fits into from floor to top of dash, but it's not a really tight fit. So I put weatherstrip adhesive in the channel, and then doubled over the flat material along the windlace, and used a small putty knife and a hammer to tap the doubled material tightly into the channel. It went in very tightly, and the glue should hold it. For the rest of the opening I glued it again, and used the putty knife to force it up behind the metal strips that hold the headliner around the door opening. Then down the back edge I loosened the interior 1/4 panel cover and glued it in place behind it, then reinstalled the screws to tighten the panel against it.




    Not sure how it's all supposed to be done, but this seemed to work, so it's done now. I just need to run the larger horizontal rubber weatherstrip along the bottom edge of the door. But the doors close so tightly now that I need to keep them closed until the weatherstrip relaxes for a day or two. Then I can go back and do that lower piece.

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  • 1946Austin
    replied
    I've been fighting an issue ever since I first fired up the SBC roller motor in my '39. I adjusted the lifters like I've always done, but soon after starting to drive the car I found some were too tight. I readjusted them, and then soon began to have some lifters ticking. So adjusted them again, and again, and soon decided something just wasn't right.
    So I called up Howard's Camshafts and asked them what they recommended for oil viscosity on their roller camshafts. He told me no heavier than 10-30 wt., and 5-20 would be even better!
    Well being an old fart whose never built anything but flat tappet Chevys in the past, I put my usual 20-50 wt. Valvoline Racing Oil in the engine! And I just did the first 500 mile change about 50 miles ago too! So went to the parts store and got 5-30 wt. oil, and came home and put that in it. I drained the oil filter, and refilled it with the lighter oil. Wasn't going to toss a brand new high capacity filter at 50 miles!
    Started the engine up, and no lifter noise at all! Amazing! Always great to learn something new at any age, but at my age it's really great! Never dreamed heavy oil would create such issues, but the tech at Howard's said these roller lifters have tighter tolerances, and they can restrict heavy oils, which stops them from properly functioning, so lash can change as the engine is either hot or cold. He went on to tell me they can also get plugged by heavier oils, so they need the lighter weight oil to ensure they flow well, and stay clear.

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  • Beagle
    replied
    Well, that description covers quite a few of my millennial counterparts at a couple of different places I worked recently. It may qualify you for more pay or a position in management!

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  • DanStokes
    replied
    Originally posted by 1946Austin View Post

    I'm a flake, and can't work well with others. Plus I can't be held to a specific schedule, and only want to work if I feel the urge. Doubt anybody wants my type corrupting their good employees!
    At the price and timeframe they quoted I doubt they HAVE any "good employees"!

    Dan

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  • 1946Austin
    replied
    Originally posted by Beagle View Post

    careful, they'll try to hire you.
    I'm a flake, and can't work well with others. Plus I can't be held to a specific schedule, and only want to work if I feel the urge. Doubt anybody wants my type corrupting their good employees!

    Leave a comment:


  • Beagle
    replied
    Originally posted by 1946Austin View Post

    No money, or patience Dan! I have considered calling up the upholstery shop and thanking them for pushing me over the edge! Maybe I'll just drop off a thank you card in their mailbox, since they're less than a half mile away!
    careful, they'll try to hire you.

    Leave a comment:


  • 1946Austin
    replied
    Originally posted by DanStokes View Post
    Or you could have just spent $174,000 and waited a year.

    Dan
    No money, or patience Dan! I have considered calling up the upholstery shop and thanking them for pushing me over the edge! Maybe I'll just drop off a thank you card in their mailbox, since they're less than a half mile away!

    Leave a comment:


  • DanStokes
    replied
    Or you could have just spent $174,000 and waited a year.

    Dan

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  • 1946Austin
    replied
    Got the 2nd seat upholstery sewed up, and managed to stay on my lines this time, so no redo on this one. Then got it back on the frame after some wrestling. Of course whenever I think I got the toughest half done, I always find out it wasn't, and the 2nd one was tougher. It require me to remove the foam from the frames, and install the upholstery to the foam partially. Then reinstall the foam, and covering, and finish locking it down to the frames then. A lot more work, but it did go on after some coaxing. Had to reach up inside the upholstery to hook some plastic stays the factory uses to pull the fabric into the seat. Good time to have these long arms that allow my knuckles to drag the ground!
    Got the seat bolted back in after the morning rains stopped, and just need to do the weatherstrip around the doors now.









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  • 1946Austin
    replied
    Originally posted by SuperBuickGuy View Post

    it's cool that you have the skill for it - there are some whose skills are in other areas....
    Seems I may not have the skill to do it right the first time, but I'm learning, and know how to fix it!

    Got out this morning before the shop got hot and fitted the backrest material, and it was too big. I had a good 1"-1.5" extra between the bolsters. Checked the base and same thing. So ripped out the seams and back to the sewing machine. At least too big is fixable with just time, and didn't need to toss the material.
    Got it cut down and stitched back together, and it fit much better. Reassembled the passenger seat, and installed it back in the car. Then unbolted the driver's seat.
    I thought the driver's seat would be easier, but there's no provision to even separate the seat back from the base!! So it was a wrestling match to get the material pulled back enough to cut hog rings, and then I had to slide the foam off the frame to be able to finish getting the material off the foam. Way less wire inserts to hog ring on the driver's seat, but it's definitely not going to be easier to reinstall.
    I removed the seams, and laid the panels over my templates. The base is the same, but backrest is different because it doesn't have the hard plastic panel. I got lucky as I cut the patterns slightly large, and it was just enough to have what I needed for the longer panel. If I had to I could have spliced it at the loop on the back, and it would look the same, but didn't need to.
    Supposed to cool down and rain tomorrow, so I'll wait until then to sew up the upholstery, and reassemble the seat. Get some pictures once they're both back in the car. I do like the combination of smooth bolsters, and diamond pattern inserts though. Just enough diamond to get rid of the cigarette burns, and also tie the seats in with the doors.

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  • SuperBuickGuy
    replied
    Originally posted by 1946Austin View Post
    Thanks guys. I've always had to build on a budget, and prefer buying tools to paying others to do things for me. So buying a good used old sewing machine just seemed like a no brainer to me.
    it's cool that you have the skill for it - there are some whose skills are in other areas....

    Leave a comment:


  • langleylad
    replied
    I hear ya my friend. I’m the same way. I’d much rather buy the tool and learn how to do the job than pay someone to do the job , but then it sometimes doesn’t go as planned. Ask me how I know .

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  • 1946Austin
    replied
    Thanks guys. I've always had to build on a budget, and prefer buying tools to paying others to do things for me. So buying a good used old sewing machine just seemed like a no brainer to me.

    Leave a comment:


  • langleylad
    replied
    Nice work !

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