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1939 Chevy coupe

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  • SuperBuickGuy
    replied
    oh joy, fiberglass work.... good luck, epoxy is your friend.

    Leave a comment:


  • fatguyzinc
    replied
    fiberglass (and wood, and even sheetmetal) will 'take a set' where they are sitting.
    especially if its in sunlight. off the car, the tendency will be for the nose to 'bow' or
    push out at sides/droop in center of hood. so now when you put it on, the center of
    hood will touch cowl first and hold edges up too high.

    heat gun while its sitting on car may do wonders. i bet even sitting on the car overnight
    will make somewhat of a difference.

    worse case, bust out the cutoff wheel and start making relief cuts. but try letting
    it sit or heating it up first, you may be pleasantly surprised--i hope !

    Leave a comment:


  • 1946Austin
    replied
    I wrestled the one piece fiberglass frontend into the shop today by climbing under it and just standing up with my back bent over to walk it inside. Then once I got it over the front tires I used ratchet straps to pull it back against the cowl and a jack stand under the nose to hold it up at that end.
    But it was discouraging to say the least. I can see the fiberglass is not a very good fit, and since it's street weight it has lots of heavy bracing inside. I think the cross brace just in front of the firewall on the backside of the hood is a major problem. The frontend sits against the cowl at center rear, but both hood sides are a full inch or so high to the adjacent body lines. That will likely mean I'll have to work on the backside brace by cutting it in the middle in a wedge cut, and hope it relaxes and allows the fenders and sides to align.
    For now I left it sitting on the car and put a bunch of weight on each fender to see if it will relax with time and maybe get closer. Probably wont though, so looks like a lot of work ahead to make it look acceptable. I think maybe letting it sit awhile will be good for me, even if it doesn't change things on the car much. I'm dreading the amount of work this will take to get it to fit, and wondering if after doing the modifications if it will look acceptable after all?

    Leave a comment:


  • 1946Austin
    replied

    LED headlights don't run cool. Where did you get that idea?
    Got it from years of installing them when I was a licensed electrician. In every instance the LED lights I used to replace existing incandescent, fluorescent, and halogen lamps ran much cooler. In almost every case you could get serious burns touching the previous lamps, and not much more than warm with LED replacements.
    My entire shop is LED lighting, and I can touch the lamps after hours of run time and they're just warm.
    But beyond all that, everything I read says LED headlamps run much cooler than halogen. So where do you get the info saying they don't?
    I didn't expect them to produce no heat at all, but certainly expected they'd be cooler than halogen headlamps.

    https://www.superbrightleds.com/blog...s-halogen/707/
    Last edited by 1946Austin; January 20th, 2020, 09:47 AM.

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  • Eric
    replied
    Is this hilarious or what?



    The new LED conversion lamps arrived for my headlights and they have little finned aluminum heat sinks on the end with little miniature cooling fans! They're supposed to run cooler than halogens, but I've never seen a halogen with a tiny cooling fan?
    LED headlights don't run cool. Where did you get that idea?

    Leave a comment:


  • oletrux4evr
    replied
    That will work.

    Leave a comment:


  • 1946Austin
    replied
    Finished sanding the grille today! Gave it a couple coats of 2x primer and then after that dried I shot the VHT graphite wheel paint on it. Didn't come out quite as dark as I expected, so chrome doesn't contrast as much as I hoped. But I think I'll leave it for now.



    Leave a comment:


  • fatguyzinc
    replied
    If I wasn't such a tightwad I'd just spend $1200-$1600 on a nice grille. But that's as much as the whole car cost, so a painted grille it is. I bought graphite color mag wheel paint, and with the stainless trim it should make a nice combination once it's done. But right now it's just a lot of work.


    prettty sure most of us are in the same mind frame,
    id rather 'make something outta nothing' than drop
    a whole buncha $$$ on something that i dont really
    "need" to make the car run/drive...

    im sure it will look just fine the way youre planning
    on doing it.

    Leave a comment:


  • oletrux4evr
    replied
    I imagine your labor rate is the same as ours...........good for you.

    Leave a comment:


  • 1946Austin
    replied
    If I wasn't such a tightwad I'd just spend $1200-$1600 on a nice grille. But that's as much as the whole car cost, so a painted grille it is. I bought graphite color mag wheel paint, and with the stainless trim it should make a nice combination once it's done. But right now it's just a lot of work.

    Leave a comment:


  • Deaf Bob
    replied
    The Austin is a fine example of Vall's work... I was impressed!

    Leave a comment:


  • DanStokes
    replied
    I think I'll wear my fingers to a nub sanding these grille bars! Even as easy as the skim coat filler sands, it's still time consuming! I spent 4 hours just sanding between each grille bar to get the excess removed. Then began to individually sand the top surface for an hour and only got about 5 bars in one side done. I can see a full day of sanding before I get to where I can spray high build primer!
    That IS one of those fussy little jobs but it's also one of those things that make a big difference in the final product. Sand On!

    Dan

    Leave a comment:


  • 1946Austin
    replied
    I think I'll wear my fingers to a nub sanding these grille bars! Even as easy as the skim coat filler sands, it's still time consuming! I spent 4 hours just sanding between each grille bar to get the excess removed. Then began to individually sand the top surface for an hour and only got about 5 bars in one side done. I can see a full day of sanding before I get to where I can spray high build primer!

    Leave a comment:


  • fatguyzinc
    replied

    So I guess they wont allow any newer cars to be imported to Hawaii?
    factory installed in the car it originally came in is ok.
    no aftermarket or retrofits. go figure.

    remember, these are the same geniuses that decreed that i
    had to put a rollbar in the K5 because "it has a fiberglass roof"
    despite the truck passing DOT rollover standards for 1982.........

    Leave a comment:


  • 1946Austin
    replied
    It's cold here! So in order to not go stir crazy I brought my two grille halves into the basement work shop and did some work on them. I have them sanded and primed with etching primer, but they had some light pitting on the surface. And since I never planned to have the grille chromed again, I mixed up some skim coat putty and gave the grille bars a skim coat. Had to mix it in small batches as using my fingers to spread a thin coat across each grille bar was time consuming and it could set up before I finished. It took about 5 golf ball sized gobs of putty to finally get them all skim coated.
    I left it to set up, and will sand them smooth and then give it a coat or two of 2x primer before the final paint. Thinking of going with mag wheel paint that's designed to not chip or wear as easily. Maybe a graphite color that will be sort of neutral and not clash with whatever color I end up with on the body.

    Leave a comment:

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