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1939 Chevy coupe

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  • #31

    Re: 1939 Chevy coupe

    Went over to my neighbor Mike's today to pull the body off one more time on his '35. It will be off for some time to do bodywork and seal it.
    After an short day I came home to find about 5 packages sitting at my door. So I grabbed them and headed to the shop. The 5/8"-LH heim joints were in the packages so I made up my tie rod! 1.25" OD tube to eliminate any flex or death wobble.



    Then I moved to the rear of the car and pulled the 9" Ford rear axle so I can begin reworking leaf springs and install the 8.8" Ford axle.
    Figured out how to get those pesky shackles apart on the rear too! I cut a 4" piece of 3/8" all thread rod and using a couple nuts and washers between the shackles, I began spreading pressure off the center hole in the shackles. Didn't take much to push the shackles apart and free them from the tapered pins!
    Last edited by 1946Austin; September 19th, 2019, 04:18 PM.
    Deaf Bob, DanStokes and oletrux4evr like this.

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    • #32

      Re: 1939 Chevy coupe

      First swap meet of the fall season today. Picked up some little bits I needed for the '39. A old pair of vintage finned aluminum valve covers. Had some red paint on them, but some Jasco stripper got that off. Just need to polish them up and they're ready to go. Also got a pair of chrome exhaust tips for when I get around to building the exhaust system. And a chrome alternator bracket too.
      A few more swap meets the next few months, so hope to find a few other items I need at one of them. Need a 4 speed automatic shifter, and pulleys for crank and water pump.

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      • #33

        Re: 1939 Chevy coupe

        Sold the '70 Mustang 9" rear axle today. Put it on Craigslist, and it took a little over an hour to go away!!!
        While I was waiting for the guy to come pick up the old axle, I cut the perches off the 8.8" Ford, and disassembled the spring packs. They had 8 leafs in the packs, which is why it sat up like a 4x4 in the rear! I removed 5 of them, and I'll see how it sits once I have the new axle in and weight on it. Then add springs if it needs more to sit right.
        I relocated the spring center pin 2" back, so the wheels will be better centered inside the opening when I radius them.





        milner351 likes this.

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        • #34

          Re: 1939 Chevy coupe

          I forgot how big and heavy that 8.8" is! Supposed to be lighter than a 9", but not sure how they weighed it? Sure feels way heavier to my back! Got the 8.8" under the car and just U bolted in, so I could see how the springs worked after removing 5 leafs. Didn't hardly notice much drop in the rear. It is softer and much easier to compress the springs, but only a couple inches lower. I will probably pull it apart once more and take all bu the main leaf out, and then add in 2-3 flat leafs from the truck front axle to see if that makes it settle more. It's sitting dead level now, but I want to remove a leaf or two up front to soften the ride, and it will sit too downhill then.
          Gave away my rollers to the guy who bought the 9", so dug out my old wrinkle wall slicks and bolted them on the back to see how it all cleared, and how it sat. They are just over an inch taller, so that will bring the rear down with the real tires on it.
          Checked the openings on the rear fender, and they wont need much removed when I radius them! The move 2" back centered the wheels perfectly, and maybe 1" off front and rear, and whatever off the top to get clearance for travel.






          Deaf Bob likes this.

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          • #35

            Re: 1939 Chevy coupe

            The two spring shops we have around here said they no longer re-arc springs due to liability reasons. They said if they changed an old spring and it later broke they could be sued. I said they could be sued if a new spring they made broke also, but of course they said they trust their new material, and their workers. I understand actually, but sad it got to this.
            My springs needed to be flatter, so less arc, not more. Today I dug the '58 Chevy truck front spring packs out of the scrap pile, and tore them apart. I chose 3 full leafs, and one shorty (just for thickness) and cut them up and buffed them clean. Then I removed all but the main leaf from the last 3 springs in my '39, and using a 5/16" centering bolt and C clamps, I stacked the springs together, and installed a nut on the bolt.
            I reassembled the spring plate and U bolts, and it sits slightly lower. But the best part is it's not mushy like it was before, so I think I can live with this and make it work. If anything needs more, I'll add a 1" or 2" lowering block as I've still got enough extra length on the U bolts to get 1"-1.5" blocks in. Probably need new U bolts to get 2" in though.



            Then I decided to see how close the fender opening is with the 2" relocation, and new springs. It's extremely close, and looks like it will only need a small "haircut" to be perfect. The front edge is tight against the tires, and I can't quite get the fenders fully bolted up yet. I measured these slicks to compare to the ones I'll be running, and they're extremely close in diameter. I'll wait until I get closer to trimming, and put the real slicks on for that part.

            [img]h]ttps://i.imgur.com/Cj8V8lQl.jpg[/img]



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            • #36

              Re: 1939 Chevy coupe

              This is another great build.

              Can you just drill the leafs for a new pin? I didn't know that .
              My current/next project is a '60 Falcon, with 2" leafs. If I can just drill 2.5" leafs, that's great info.
              1997 Ranger 5.0L HO, GT40 heads/tubular intake, 65mm TB, 1.7rr, B303, Tri-Y headers, dual 2.5" exhaust, Flowmaster mufflers, T5 trans, Tri-Ax shifter, CenterForce Dual Friction clutch, 8.8 Traction Lok 3.55 gears, Cobra 13" front brakes, Cobra 11.65" rear discs.
              1997 Mustang GT
              sigpic


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              • #37

                Re: 1939 Chevy coupe

                This is another great build.

                Can you just drill the leafs for a new pin? I didn't know that .
                My current/next project is a '60 Falcon, with 2" leafs. If I can just drill 2.5" leafs, that's great info.
                Use good bits. Lots cutting fluid. Not WD-40..
                Be sure you can get ribbons off the bit.
                Do it all the time for our derby cars.
                Teddyzee likes this.

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                • #38

                  Re: 1939 Chevy coupe


                  Use good bits. Lots cutting fluid. Not WD-40..
                  Be sure you can get ribbons off the bit.
                  Do it all the time for our derby cars.

                  I do it on numerous occasions, and exactly as Bob described. In the case of my '39 I only redrilled one leaf as the others worked with the existing hole. I did cut off a few other leafs to make up a spring pack for both sides from the spares I had.
                  I still need to buy some spring pack straps to keep the new spring packs aligned.
                  I have a set of Drill Hog cobalt bits that are extremely sharp, and guaranteed for life against breakage. I use Tapmatic fluid for drilling, and stop a few times during the process to keep the hole lubricated. I also go slowly and the metal curls off in nice long coils as I go. Took no time at all to drill the holes. The Drill Hog colbalt set from 1/16"-1/2" was only $50 and free shipping.

                  Another thing I use is Allen cap screws in 5/16" NF for the center bolts. They're the right size diameter for both head and shank, plus they are hardened better than standard grade bolts. Usually grade 5 or better.

                  Teddyzee likes this.

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                  • #39

                    Re: 1939 Chevy coupe

                    Made a parts run today for nuts and bolts. Man those grade 8 hardware pieces are getting crazy priced! A handful of bolts, nuts, washers, and locking nuts was $35!!!

                    Came home and replaced the temporary bolts in the frontend, and then decided to swap rear tires so I could see where I'm really at with the fenders. Removed the slicks and bolted up the fenders with all the hardware. Then I put the pie crust slicks and wheels on to see how they fit. As I suspected the tires sit inside the fenders more than I thought they would. So have to think on it awhile before I do anything. They don't look bad inside, but I had my mind set on about 3/4" outside, so not sure if I'll space them out, or leave them in?
                    The fenders of course have been reworked, and repaired previously, and now I know how much! One side is pretty centered on the tire, and the other is tight at the front, and big at the back. Also one opening is also larger front to back by 1". All this needs to be addressed regardless of how I go on the wheels and tires.

                    Right rear.






                    Front edge of the right side almost touching.



                    Rear edge. This is the side that's 1" larger.



                    Left side, rear edge:



                    Left side front edge:



                    Whoever worked on the fenders made a very large 1" rolled edge around the openings. I need to look at an original fender to see if they have anything even slightly similar? I may cut the entire rolled edge off, and then weld on a much smaller 1/4" edge bead.
                    BFXJason likes this.

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                    • #40

                      Re: 1939 Chevy coupe

                      I have 3/8 wire on Mary's '40. Makes it solid as heck.
                      Ed, Mary, & 'Earl'
                      HRPT LongHaulers, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12, 13, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19.


                      Inside every old person is a young person wondering, "what the hell happened?"

                      The man at the top of the mountain didn't fall there. -Vince Lombardi

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                      • #41

                        Re: 1939 Chevy coupe

                        I have 3/8 wire on Mary's '40. Makes it solid as heck.
                        I'm sure it does, but seems like overkill to me? I used 3/16" on my '37 Austin and it's stiff as I'd ever want. I'm going to look into how the 3/8" rod is attached, and if it's not welded solid all along the rolled edge I'll remove it to do the radius and replace it with 3/16" after I cut the new opening to fit.
                        But before I do that I need to make up new spring perches that are taller so it effectively lowers the back of the car. I'd rather do new weld in perches than end up using lowering blocks. I've got an extra 1.5" on the threads for my U bolts, so figure I'll go 1" taller blocks to drop it another inch.


                        I spent about 4 hours on the car today and really got nothing done that shows. The center bar for the windshield had all the screws for inner/outer trim rusted solid. So I cut them all off and tapped out 3 of the holes. Two others broke off and couldn't be saved, so I ground the metal and made 8-32 nut plates and welded them to the bar.
                        Then I began rough sanding the joints on the patch panels and my angle grinder started cutting out. So tore that apart and shortened up the cord to get rid of broken wires.
                        After that I did a little welding on the tubular crossmember up front to make it permanent. Then called it a day since I wasn't getting much done. Hopefully tomorrow will be better. Going to assemble the lower end of the engine and install rockers and pushrods.

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                        • #42

                          Re: 1939 Chevy coupe

                          You work fast and hard! Nothing done, my azz!
                          1946Austin likes this.

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                          • #43

                            Re: 1939 Chevy coupe

                            You work fast and hard! Nothing done, my azz!
                            Thanks Bob! I tend to get impatient when I finish for the day and seems like nothing much has changed. I remember when I was building the Austin and I spent 8-10 hrs. a day, seven days a week! At almost 69 yrs. old I seem to be good for about 4-5 hrs. a day, and not every day!
                            Last edited by 1946Austin; September 29th, 2019, 07:33 AM.
                            Deaf Bob and SuperBuickGuy like this.

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                            • #44

                              Re: 1939 Chevy coupe


                              Thanks Bob! I tend to get impatient when I finish for the day and seems like nothing much has changed. I remember when I was building the Austin and I spent 8-10 hrs. a day, seven days a week! At almost 69 yrs. old I seem to be good for about 4-5 hrs. a day, and not every day!
                              It only gets more so! I tell myself I'm doing OK as long as I'm out and doing something.

                              Dan
                              Deaf Bob and 1946Austin like this.

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                              • #45

                                Re: 1939 Chevy coupe


                                Thanks Bob! I tend to get impatient when I finish for the day and seems like nothing much has changed. I remember when I was building the Austin and I spent 8-10 hrs. a day, seven days a week! At almost 69 yrs. old I seem to be good for about 4-5 hrs. a day, and not every day!
                                I hear you. 73 is killing me work-wise.
                                Deaf Bob and 1946Austin like this.
                                Ed, Mary, & 'Earl'
                                HRPT LongHaulers, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12, 13, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19.


                                Inside every old person is a young person wondering, "what the hell happened?"

                                The man at the top of the mountain didn't fall there. -Vince Lombardi

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