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1939 Chevy coupe

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  • 1946Austin
    replied
    I got braided black poly over PVC, and I cut it with my large cable cutters that give a really clean cut.

    But I found out a couple things that were causing me all the grief. First was the nuts that thread over the hose were left hand thread! So turning them CCW is the key. Second I made up a oak block to clamp the hose in my vise by drilling a hole the size of the hose, and then cutting the blocks in half. That way it clamped the hose to hold it, but didn't crush it. Having it held close to the end made threading the nut on much easier! I could thread it down until the hose bottomed out without using a wrench.
    Once I got the hose on I put a drop of lube on the barb fitting and threaded it into the hose easily too. After figuring out the first one, the others went super easy! Just used a pair of crescent wrenches with taped up jaws to protect the finish. I left the last of the hose to the fuel pump long, so I can trim to length once this is on the carb.

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  • SuperBuickGuy
    replied
    which braided line did you get? stainless over rubber or stainless over PVC?

    The rubber stuff is a pain, usually I wrap the line with electrical tape (tightly) then cut it with a die grinder in the middle of the tape. I then run the nut over the top (sometimes you can thread it over)*, pull the tape off, mark the edge of the fitting at full tighten, feed the fitting in, then tighten - making sure I can see my mark once it's tight (the hose can slip).

    *whatever you do, be gentle and look carefully at the stainless wires - trimming off any wire that is sticking out

    For PVC (which I prefer about a billion times better), I have a line cutter, then I take a small screwdriver and make the plastic tube round so I can slide the tightening fitting over the hose, then I stretch the inner tube enough so that the brass ferrel will slide over the inner PVC tube (it's not PVC, but it's not rubber), I then fight the fitting into the tube until it 'snaps' into place then tighten the nut over the outside - do NOT over tighten this one, it's not terribly weak, but if you really get on it, you will break the fitting.

    now my opinion, if you bought rubber, throw it away or use it strictly for vent line. you will constantly have a fuel smell because vapor can escape that hose. The PVC stuff costs a bit more, but no fuel smell - add to the easier-to-assemble aspect and rubber line can die with buggy whips.
    Last edited by SuperBuickGuy; December 29th, 2019, 09:04 AM.

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  • oletrux4evr
    replied
    You need a Kool Tools 468......does AN-4, -6, -8. The best $75 you'll ever spend. Other sets are available for larger hoses too.
    https://www.summitracing.com/search/brand/koul-tools
    Last edited by oletrux4evr; December 28th, 2019, 08:55 PM.

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  • 1946Austin
    replied
    Put the Accel electronic kit in the distributor today, and dropped it in the engine. I also did the coarse valve adjustment, and once I prime the engine I'll double check it again before starting. I hooked up the temp and oil senders, and put in water pump plugs. Still need to get one little lower block plug, as I thought it was 3/8 pipe, but it's much smaller. Looks more like 1/8" pipe thread.
    Noticed I'd never finished up the front ladder bar mounts as they still had low grade bolts. Swapped them for grade 8 and tightened everything down. Then decided to build up my -6AN fuel lines, but I couldn't get the hose to fit at all. It's like the AN nuts are too small to slide over the braid? I finally gave up after cutting it 3 times, and still not getting it together. I'll measure it all up, and take it down to the basement and clamp things in my vise so I can have a better hold on it. I watched 4 or 5 videos of guys putting this AN stuff together, and nobody had any big issues like I did.
    Stopped and went back on wiring. Sorted out the taillight wiring, and figured out the retrofit LED color codes for those. It seems like every LED maker uses a different weird code, but these actually were normal! Black for ground, yellow for running lights, and red for brake/turn signals.

    Last edited by 1946Austin; December 28th, 2019, 07:35 PM.

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  • 1946Austin
    replied

    look at the flange on the crank, it's not round.... that's weight that got removed....
    Yes, the later crank is round, and earlier is the one on the right with weight removed. So I guess you answered my question of why. Since the later 1 piece seal does it's sealing on that round flange. They'd have to change the weight inside to make up for the extra metal outside. Easier to add it back to the flywheel.

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  • SuperBuickGuy
    replied
    And another thing I remembered. My harmonic balancer was sketchy, so I bought a new one. But I noticed when I got the new balancer it had a larger hole for the crank snout. I checked the new one with an older balancer I had sitting here, and sure enough, the crank diameter is larger at the snout. The pre 1986 balancer wont fit on the later engines.
    But there are some good changes, like the roller camshaft, and the cam retainer plate to eliminate cam walk. But I still don't understand the thinking behind going half external balancing? Would love to ask a Chevy engineer why they decided to make that change!
    look at the flange on the crank, it's not round.... that's weight that got removed....

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  • 1946Austin
    replied

    it only gets confusing when you get to the last version LT1 motor with reverse flow... this one actually makes some sense because they had to remove the flange to install a one-piece rear seal....
    And that one piece rear main seal means a different oil pan too! It's longer than the old style oil pan since the housing for the new main seal bolts to the back of the engine. I had a nice finned aluminum polished oil pan here I wanted to use. But dropped it on the block and immediately saw it was too short. And dipstick on the wrong side too! Newer SBC have passenger side dipsticks.

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  • 1946Austin
    replied
    And another thing I remembered. My harmonic balancer was sketchy, so I bought a new one. But I noticed when I got the new balancer it had a larger hole for the crank snout. I checked the new one with an older balancer I had sitting here, and sure enough, the crank diameter is larger at the snout. The pre 1986 balancer wont fit on the later engines.
    But there are some good changes, like the roller camshaft, and the cam retainer plate to eliminate cam walk. But I still don't understand the thinking behind going half external balancing? Would love to ask a Chevy engineer why they decided to make that change!

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  • SuperBuickGuy
    replied

    Thanks Aaron! Something else I didn't know! My first one piece main seal motor, and my first roller cam motor too. It seems I have to learn a lot about this generation of SBC!
    it only gets confusing when you get to the last version LT1 motor with reverse flow... this one actually makes some sense because they had to remove the flange to install a one-piece rear seal....

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  • Deaf Bob
    replied
    I knew there were some differences, what? I didn't know.. Thanks for the info!

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  • 1946Austin
    replied
    your 1990 motor has a smaller diameter bolt pattern on the crank because of the one-piece seal..... where the pre-86 flex plates will bolt up to a 400, it won't bolt up to your motor.....
    Thanks Aaron! Something else I didn't know! My first one piece main seal motor, and my first roller cam motor too. It seems I have to learn a lot about this generation of SBC!

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  • SuperBuickGuy
    replied
    your 1990 motor has a smaller diameter bolt pattern on the crank because of the one-piece seal..... where the pre-86 flex plates will bolt up to a 400, it won't bolt up to your motor.....

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  • 1946Austin
    replied
    Had one of those gut wrenching feelings the other day when my starter didn't fit. I began to wonder if my flexplate was wrong too? The flexplate on my 1990 350 has a big weight on it, and I was surprised to see that since I'd read all SBC except the SBC 400 were internally balanced.
    So today I spent some time researching various SBC flexplates. It seems that 1955-'85 are 2 piece main seals and internally balanced. Except the SBC 400 that uses a special externally balanced flywheel and harmonic balancer. Then in 1986 Chevy decided to really screw things up! They added a externallly balanced flexplate, but kept the internal balancing enough to use the earlier internal balance harmonic balancer!
    So the 1986-'97 are only half external balanced, and it's done so at the flexplate. Explains why mine has a externally balanced flexplate, but regular harmonic balancer. I can relax and not freak out over this now.
    Another new learning experience for this old dinosaur!

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  • 1946Austin
    replied
    Stopped by Old Car Parts here in Portland to see if they had a pair of chrome headlight rings. They found three of them in varying states of less than perfect. But less than perfect is perfect for my build. One was a bit tarnished, one nice chrome, but missing the tensioning screw setup, and the last one had the setup, but a big dent down towards the bottom. So I worked a deal on all three, so I could piece two decent ones together.
    While I was there I asked about the possibility of a locking outside door handle.....with key! Of course the owner said they never got anything like that in. Then he walked off to the back. As I was looking over my trim rings he came back out and laid a outside handle with a key in it on the counter!! So I now have a locking door handle for one side, which is all they originally had anyway. Chevy only put a lock in the passenger door back then, but my car has them in both doors, and no keys. So I'll lock the passenger door from inside, and the driver's door with my key.
    When I got home I took the rings to my basement shop, and got out my sand bag and a block of wood. I tapped the dent out of the one trim ring, and it came out great. Especially since the dent is on the bottom where nobody will see minor imperfections. I polished the other decent one with Mother's and it came out good also. Success!

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  • 1946Austin
    replied
    I would recommend looking at Specialty Power Windows wiper drive kit. I put one in the wagon and it is working well so far. It was a pain in the ass to install in a finished car but wouldn't be that big of deal for you at your stage of the build.

    I know it is unmanly to talk about using anything more that RainX on a hot rod's windshield but on many occasions I have been grateful to have them working properly.
    I had wiper motor system from a late 70's Ford truck in my '63 Falcon gasser and it sure made a difference in how often I drove the car. I didn't stay home if it looked cloudy since I knew I had good wipers. I'll take a look at that setup. I had considered buying one of the systems that use a motor directly behind the wiper, so if you want two you need two motors. Figured I could get by with one wiper in a pinch.

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