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1939 Chevy coupe

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  • 1946Austin
    replied
    Nothing going on today that could pull me away, so I put in some time on the car. Removed all the crumby fuel line and battery straps, and replaced them with good quality rubber insulated straps. Cut up the battery cables and crimped on the ends so they're ready for a battery to go in. Made up full sized 2/0 jumpers from battery ground to frame, and from frame up front to engine block. Ground all the surfaces so shouldn't have any resistance or grounding issues.
    Installed the dipstick tube for the engine, and also the fan on the water pump. Need to buy a small number of toggle switches for various items so I have a way to cut them off if needed. I'd like to get the fiberglass nose on the car to begin building my framework, but this darn rain is getting in the way of me rolling the car outside to set the nose on it!

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  • Deaf Bob
    replied
    Yep. All wet here and nasty!

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  • 1946Austin
    replied
    Sure was nice today. Got a decent pic of Hood from down by Monmouth. But by the time it zoomed in, fuzzy. Also saw Jefferson.. Yep. Rare sunny day.
    Sounds like we're gonna pay for that one great day now! Rain for at least the next week or so!

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  • Deaf Bob
    replied
    Sure was nice today. Got a decent pic of Hood from down by Monmouth. But by the time it zoomed in, fuzzy. Also saw Jefferson.. Yep. Rare sunny day.

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  • 1946Austin
    replied
    We had one of those rare warm winter days today! Got up to high 50's, so I got out to the shop and mixed up some skim coat putty and skim coated the seams and joints I have all over the car. Didn't have time to sand today, so maybe this weekend I can get back on it and begin blocking these areas out.

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  • 1946Austin
    replied
    So how does a guy fill tranny fluid in a dipstick tube that's almost horizontal? Seems like a perfect way to end up with fluid all over the top of your clean engine to me. Guess I'll have to get some clear fuel line and hook it to my funnel. Then slide it down the tube far enough and wrap a rag around the end to avoid drips.

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  • 1946Austin
    replied
    The little bits and pieces sure take time! I installed my flexible throttle cable assembly and spoon type gas pedal yesterday. And also the kickdown bracket and cable for the 700R4. Then finished the wiring at the trunk area for lights, and fuel gauge. Pretty much ate up 3 or 4 hours.

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  • 1946Austin
    replied
    I got braided black poly over PVC, and I cut it with my large cable cutters that give a really clean cut.

    But I found out a couple things that were causing me all the grief. First was the nuts that thread over the hose were left hand thread! So turning them CCW is the key. Second I made up a oak block to clamp the hose in my vise by drilling a hole the size of the hose, and then cutting the blocks in half. That way it clamped the hose to hold it, but didn't crush it. Having it held close to the end made threading the nut on much easier! I could thread it down until the hose bottomed out without using a wrench.
    Once I got the hose on I put a drop of lube on the barb fitting and threaded it into the hose easily too. After figuring out the first one, the others went super easy! Just used a pair of crescent wrenches with taped up jaws to protect the finish. I left the last of the hose to the fuel pump long, so I can trim to length once this is on the carb.

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  • SuperBuickGuy
    replied
    which braided line did you get? stainless over rubber or stainless over PVC?

    The rubber stuff is a pain, usually I wrap the line with electrical tape (tightly) then cut it with a die grinder in the middle of the tape. I then run the nut over the top (sometimes you can thread it over)*, pull the tape off, mark the edge of the fitting at full tighten, feed the fitting in, then tighten - making sure I can see my mark once it's tight (the hose can slip).

    *whatever you do, be gentle and look carefully at the stainless wires - trimming off any wire that is sticking out

    For PVC (which I prefer about a billion times better), I have a line cutter, then I take a small screwdriver and make the plastic tube round so I can slide the tightening fitting over the hose, then I stretch the inner tube enough so that the brass ferrel will slide over the inner PVC tube (it's not PVC, but it's not rubber), I then fight the fitting into the tube until it 'snaps' into place then tighten the nut over the outside - do NOT over tighten this one, it's not terribly weak, but if you really get on it, you will break the fitting.

    now my opinion, if you bought rubber, throw it away or use it strictly for vent line. you will constantly have a fuel smell because vapor can escape that hose. The PVC stuff costs a bit more, but no fuel smell - add to the easier-to-assemble aspect and rubber line can die with buggy whips.
    Last edited by SuperBuickGuy; December 29th, 2019, 09:04 AM.

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  • oletrux4evr
    replied
    You need a Kool Tools 468......does AN-4, -6, -8. The best $75 you'll ever spend. Other sets are available for larger hoses too.
    https://www.summitracing.com/search/brand/koul-tools
    Last edited by oletrux4evr; December 28th, 2019, 08:55 PM.

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  • 1946Austin
    replied
    Put the Accel electronic kit in the distributor today, and dropped it in the engine. I also did the coarse valve adjustment, and once I prime the engine I'll double check it again before starting. I hooked up the temp and oil senders, and put in water pump plugs. Still need to get one little lower block plug, as I thought it was 3/8 pipe, but it's much smaller. Looks more like 1/8" pipe thread.
    Noticed I'd never finished up the front ladder bar mounts as they still had low grade bolts. Swapped them for grade 8 and tightened everything down. Then decided to build up my -6AN fuel lines, but I couldn't get the hose to fit at all. It's like the AN nuts are too small to slide over the braid? I finally gave up after cutting it 3 times, and still not getting it together. I'll measure it all up, and take it down to the basement and clamp things in my vise so I can have a better hold on it. I watched 4 or 5 videos of guys putting this AN stuff together, and nobody had any big issues like I did.
    Stopped and went back on wiring. Sorted out the taillight wiring, and figured out the retrofit LED color codes for those. It seems like every LED maker uses a different weird code, but these actually were normal! Black for ground, yellow for running lights, and red for brake/turn signals.

    Last edited by 1946Austin; December 28th, 2019, 07:35 PM.

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  • 1946Austin
    replied

    look at the flange on the crank, it's not round.... that's weight that got removed....
    Yes, the later crank is round, and earlier is the one on the right with weight removed. So I guess you answered my question of why. Since the later 1 piece seal does it's sealing on that round flange. They'd have to change the weight inside to make up for the extra metal outside. Easier to add it back to the flywheel.

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  • SuperBuickGuy
    replied
    And another thing I remembered. My harmonic balancer was sketchy, so I bought a new one. But I noticed when I got the new balancer it had a larger hole for the crank snout. I checked the new one with an older balancer I had sitting here, and sure enough, the crank diameter is larger at the snout. The pre 1986 balancer wont fit on the later engines.
    But there are some good changes, like the roller camshaft, and the cam retainer plate to eliminate cam walk. But I still don't understand the thinking behind going half external balancing? Would love to ask a Chevy engineer why they decided to make that change!
    look at the flange on the crank, it's not round.... that's weight that got removed....

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  • 1946Austin
    replied

    it only gets confusing when you get to the last version LT1 motor with reverse flow... this one actually makes some sense because they had to remove the flange to install a one-piece rear seal....
    And that one piece rear main seal means a different oil pan too! It's longer than the old style oil pan since the housing for the new main seal bolts to the back of the engine. I had a nice finned aluminum polished oil pan here I wanted to use. But dropped it on the block and immediately saw it was too short. And dipstick on the wrong side too! Newer SBC have passenger side dipsticks.

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  • 1946Austin
    replied
    And another thing I remembered. My harmonic balancer was sketchy, so I bought a new one. But I noticed when I got the new balancer it had a larger hole for the crank snout. I checked the new one with an older balancer I had sitting here, and sure enough, the crank diameter is larger at the snout. The pre 1986 balancer wont fit on the later engines.
    But there are some good changes, like the roller camshaft, and the cam retainer plate to eliminate cam walk. But I still don't understand the thinking behind going half external balancing? Would love to ask a Chevy engineer why they decided to make that change!

    Leave a comment:

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