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1939 Chevy coupe

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  • milner351
    replied
    Great progress - it's those little things on the first few shake down runs that show you what new parts are good and which aren't. Frustrating that a new relay or temp sensor would fail that quickly. This is such a cool car, you do great work!

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  • 1946Austin
    replied
    Went to a cruise up north Friday night. On the way home got stuck in traffic and the temperature went up well above the usual 180 degrees. At around 200 degrees I pulled over to check, and the electric fan wasn't running. Unplugged the sensor and grounded the wire and the fan relay pulled in and worked. So I grabbed my tool bag and temped the wire to a ground to make it run full time. Temp came down and it was fine then.
    I ordered a new sensor that doesn't hook into the cooling system, but has a probe that mounts on the backside of the radiator. It's also adjustable, so I can select when it closes the contacts. Installed it today, and started the engine up. Then once it got to 170 degrees I turned the stat until the fan came on, and left it there.
    Also pulled the valve covers and readjusted the lash. Had a couple valves too tight, and had a full turn more than they needed. Did the 500 mile oil change, and filter, and cut the filter open to inspect things. All looks good, so just drive a lot, and enjoy it until winter when I'll restart bodywork.

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  • 1946Austin
    replied
    Since none of the seams will be exposed stitches, it's a little more forgiving than they'd be if everyone could see them.I doubt I'd take on complete restoration of interior, with French seams, etc. But turning the material inside out, and sewing the back side shouldn't be any problem for a beginner.
    I hope I can get a used machine with a walking foot, but not sure I want to pay $800 or more, and then try to recoup something that high when I sold it?
    I doubt anyone would be foolish enough to rent their quality sewing machine to a stranger with no experience. But I do have one lead of a friend whose wife did upholstery work, and I need to talk to her and see if she sold everything when she retired about 8 yrs. ago? She wanted to get her son to take it all over, but not sure that happened. If she still has it she'd probably just let me use it.

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  • Deaf Bob
    replied
    I can sew. Not well.. Straight lines? What madness is that?

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  • Beagle
    replied
    Originally posted by 1946Austin View Post

    I've always bought tools to do my own work, and keep them forever. But I'm closing in on 70 yrs. old in a few months, so why keep a sewing machine longer than I need to? Not like I'm going to be using it for decades to come, and not like I plan to take up sewing as a hobby or side income. I've got plenty to keep me busy, so I wont take up space keeping a sewing machine I wont use. Makes much more sense to buy a used machine, fix the seats, and then sell it to get some or all of my investment back.
    Can you rent one? The nothing makes sense part I was saying was everything got expensive really quick. It seems like staying at home and self quarantining made 50.00 junk suddenly worth 400.00 ... there wasn't much ramp to the rise in prices.

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  • SuperBuickGuy
    replied
    two things:
    1) it's a talent to make straight lines on fabric
    2) once you get your talent in line, you can do the interior on my Buick wagon :D

    my dad is closing in on 80 this year, you have lots of time to learn a new talent.

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  • 1946Austin
    replied
    Originally posted by Beagle View Post

    Resell... explain? I buy stuff, it stays forever. How does this work?

    Can't be that tough... yes it can. LOL!!!

    Nothing makes sense to me right now. I think they are quoting in pesos, like how I get paid! I'd say go for it, worst thing that is going to happen is you learn something. You might even like it.
    I've always bought tools to do my own work, and keep them forever. But I'm closing in on 70 yrs. old in a few months, so why keep a sewing machine longer than I need to? Not like I'm going to be using it for decades to come, and not like I plan to take up sewing as a hobby or side income. I've got plenty to keep me busy, so I wont take up space keeping a sewing machine I wont use. Makes much more sense to buy a used machine, fix the seats, and then sell it to get some or all of my investment back.

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  • DanStokes
    replied
    A note on commercial sewing machines (I looked into this 30+ years ago). My horse trainer friend has a Juki that he uses for tack repairs and such. He bought it cheap and used and now we know why - it does not have a walking foot. The walking foot feature pulls the work thru the needle at the correct rate so the stitches are properly spaced. BTW - your Mom's Singer was not a walking foot machine. The ones w/o walking foot will work but they are much harder to use with nice results. So the question is, as a rookie do you want a machine that makes the job easier? I toyed with buying a machine but never did but if I did it would have a walking foot.

    Dan

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  • Beagle
    replied
    Originally posted by 1946Austin View Post
    .... I might have to go buy a good used commercial sewing machine, and then resell it once I finish the sewing. Can't be that tough to just cut out two inserts, trace them, and sew in new black naugahyde diamond pattern inserts? They're just a plain rectangle.
    Resell... explain? I buy stuff, it stays forever. How does this work?

    Can't be that tough... yes it can. LOL!!!

    Nothing makes sense to me right now. I think they are quoting in pesos, like how I get paid! I'd say go for it, worst thing that is going to happen is you learn something. You might even like it.

    Leave a comment:


  • 1946Austin
    replied
    My coupe is running well, and doing great on the road. But at idle it's pretty rich smelling, and nothing I do to adjust idle air mixture changes it. So looks like I'll need to pull the carb off and swap out power valves to get down from the stock 6.5's to a 3.5 set. My vacuum at idle is right at 10", but at 1500 rpm's or higher it's twice that. So I think the low idle vacuum is messing up the power valves.

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  • 1946Austin
    replied
    Just got a case of sticker shock while talking to the upholstery shop person. I had purchased extra diamond pattern material so I could have them do the center inserts on seat bases and backs. I asked when they might be able to sew them in the seats, and was told maybe 3 weeks. Then she asked me to hold.
    When she came back she said she talked to the upholsterer and he said $450-$500 to sew two inserts that are probably 16" wide x 24" long, with my material. Now I know the work is stripping the seats, and the reinstalling the covers, but seems a little crazy compared to the $370 I paid to have both of my Mustang buckets completely covered for the Falcon.
    Told them I'd have to do some pondering before I committed to paying that price. I might have to go buy a good used commercial sewing machine, and then resell it once I finish the sewing. Can't be that tough to just cut out two inserts, trace them, and sew in new black naugahyde diamond pattern inserts? They're just a plain rectangle.

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  • SuperBuickGuy
    replied
    Originally posted by DanStokes View Post

    Doesn't anyone proofread?

    Dan
    he still has a bit of satan in him?

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  • 1946Austin
    replied
    Originally posted by DanStokes View Post

    Doesn't anyone proofread?

    Dan
    Obviously the drinling from the rubber hose did have some efffect.

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  • DanStokes
    replied
    Originally posted by SuperBuickGuy View Post
    Doesn't anyone proofread?

    Dan

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  • SuperBuickGuy
    replied

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