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1939 Chevy coupe

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  • #61

    Re: 1939 Chevy coupe

    Really big day today!!!



    Bolted the engine and trans together, and put the SS fenderwell headers on the engine, and lowered it into the chassis!



    Got some measurements and used the 2" box tubing to fabricate motor mounts. Cut it down at a 45 degree where I welded it to the steel sleeve that bolts to the motor mount, and then tacked it good to the frame. Need to pull the headers to finish welding the motor mounts in.







    I was going to just block up the tranny since I had no rubber mount, but ran to the chain store and they actually had a mount! So I built the trans mount too, but didn't get it drilled and bolted to the frame rails. Just too pooped to go further today.



    Had to cut the bottom of the center tube open as the mount had a stud and needed access to get to it for a nut and washer.
    oletrux4evr and DanStokes like this.

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    • #62

      Re: 1939 Chevy coupe

      nice
      1946Austin likes this.
      Doing it all wrong since 1966

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      • #63

        Re: 1939 Chevy coupe

        Those headers are in JUST the right place!

        Dan
        1946Austin likes this.

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        • #64

          Re: 1939 Chevy coupe

          Those headers are in JUST the right place!

          Dan
          Thanks! They are really nicely made headers, with thick 3/8" flanges. Especially considering they're from China, and cost a whopping $105! I used the same headers, but in plain steel on my Austin that were Patriot brand. They were a bargain at $214 back 9 years ago. Amazing what those little Chinese guys can build for next to nothing!

          They're just listed as "Fat Fender Chevy Headers", but seem to fit a lot of cars from the early 30's to '54 Chevys.

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          • #65

            Re: 1939 Chevy coupe

            Got a late start on the '39 today, but wanted to at least get the steering box sorted out. It seems I got in my own way when I welded in the round crossmember at the end of the frame rails. I planned to go front side steer, and needed that area to mount the Vega box in. So had to tack in a temp piece on top of the frame, and then cut out the round tubular piece. Welded in the mount for the Vega box, and then welded in another new tubular crossmember a couple inches further back.
            Then I made up a drag link from the 1.25" DOM tubing, and hooked it up to the Vega box temporarily with some 1/2" bolts. Need to go buy some more spendy 5/8" NF Grade 8 bolts for the drag link, and the steering box mounting bolts.



            BFXJason likes this.

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            • #66

              Re: 1939 Chevy coupe

              In Michigan some offices you can "get in line online" I have not tried it yet but friends rave about it- it's basically like signing up for an appointment time, then you just walk in when they tell you you're close - and viola you're next in line.
              Here you go to the DMV, sign in on their computer, and they text you with updates. No waiting in the office unless you want to watch bureaucrats poking along.

              I'm a Patriot headers fan too.
              Last edited by oletrux4evr; October 7th, 2019, 06:54 AM.
              Ed, Mary, & 'Earl'
              HRPT LongHaulers, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12, 13, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19.


              Inside every old person is a young person wondering, "what the hell happened?"

              The man at the top of the mountain didn't fall there. -Vince Lombardi

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              • #67

                Re: 1939 Chevy coupe

                I'm more exhausted today than if I worked 4 hours on my car! Spent the morning at DMV getting title changed, and 1939 plates assigned to my '39 Chevy! I went there last Friday to do the same, only to wait 2.5 hours and be told the seller signed off the title in the wrong spot!!!
                Then this morning another 2 hrs. to be told, "Your '39 plates aren't in our system?"
                Well of course they're not in your system! If they were in your system they'd be assigned to a vehicle and I couldn't use them! Idiots. I asked for a supervisor, and she showed him how to assign the plates to me and my car, so I got the title and plates taken care of. Fortunately the seller didn't date the title, so didn't have to pay the late charge for not changing the title within 30 days.
                I'd rather work a 24 hour day on the car than go to DMV again!! At least the "Special Interest" registration means I'll never go to DMV again for this car! One time deal, and never needs renewal.

                I did go to a different DMV in a local mall, so once I got my number and saw I was 63 numbers ahead of my number, I went to the mall and walked around killing time. Walked back in and saw I was 5 numbers behind, so got in line and waited. Still had some jackass walk in and go to the window just ahead of me. I went up to the window when he did and asked him what made him so special that he didn't need to wait 2.5 hrs.? The DMV guy asked him for his number ticket, and he said he lost it. I called BS on him, and they made him go get a ticket and get in the back of the line.
                Last edited by 1946Austin; October 7th, 2019, 11:59 AM.
                SuperBuickGuy likes this.

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                • #68

                  Re: 1939 Chevy coupe

                  Isn't it interesting how the rules don't apply to some people? I was never one of THOSE PEOPLE and don't want to be - makes for an unorganized society.

                  Dan
                  1946Austin likes this.

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                  • #69

                    Re: 1939 Chevy coupe

                    Isn't it interesting how the rules don't apply to some people? I was never one of THOSE PEOPLE and don't want to be - makes for an unorganized society.

                    Dan
                    Yes, I find it interesting that some feel they're too special to wait in line like everyone else. So those who do the right thing and wait their turn are punished by having to wait longer for the special people who cut in!
                    The DMV supervisor stands behind the counter people just watching it all, but is too bored to really see people jumping the line. I mentioned to him they have a huge issue, and all he could say was, "We just turned the guy away that cut the line in front of you."
                    I responded, "You'd have never even seen it if I hadn't spoken up and made a fuss about it."

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                    • #70

                      Re: 1939 Chevy coupe

                      Being deaf, I do not always know when I can go up... Very stressful. Many hollar out. Don't change the nbr board and zip past me.
                      Once they let me cut in, I just said " No, all I want is "MY TURN"
                      Nerve of some people! Cut in line. Lost ticket? Get another! Sorry.. Rant done!
                      1946Austin likes this.

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                      • #71

                        Re: 1939 Chevy coupe

                        Installed the nuts and bolts for the drag link to complete the front steering.



                        Then using some tubing to simulate where the double D shaft's path would be, I determined where to punch the firewall for the steering column. Before punching a hole I put a seat in on the driver's side and blocked it up where it would sit level. Then used another piece of tube to determine steering column location, and angle to make sure the previous hole was correct.
                        Punched the hole and dropped the steering column through it, and tied it up with wire. Looks like it needs about a 2"-3" drop below the dash. Since it's a tilt column and I had it straight, I'll go for 2" and I can tilt it down if needed.





                        The way the seat lined up, one mounting hole was right over a body bolt. So I removed that bolt and cut another longer to allow the seat to share the same bolt, and be bolted with separate nuts above the body nut. Two of the other three tabs were fine, but needed slight bending to be parallel to the floor. The 3rd had a vertical tab, so I cut it off and welded on a horizontal tab to match the other three.
                        Climbed in and checked the position, and it was great. So ready to make up the drop for the column, and the double D shaft and joints when those parts arrive. In the meantime I need to rebuild the steering column upper bushing. Didn't notice it before, but there's a ton of slop at the upper column, and with the wheel on it's really exaggerated!

                        I also looked at how to mate the Impreza brake pedal to the Corvette master cylinder. I made a template from cardboard and drilled holes for the brake pedal mounting points. Then cut out the center hole, and drilled holes through the cardboard, and the pedal assembly for the master cylinder bolts. Bolted it all together to check fit, and I'll use it to build a 3/16" thick plate to be sandwiched between the master and pedal on the firewall. I'll tack weld the bolts to the plate after drilling and tapping the holes so I can use one wrench to tighten everything up.
                        The plate will be larger than the cardboard pattern to eliminate any chance of firewall flexing.



                        milner351 and BFXJason like this.

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                        • #72

                          Re: 1939 Chevy coupe

                          The tilt column I have was messed up. Missing the lock plate for the top, plus the spring, and other internal parts. And when I began looking for the missing parts the total cost came up too high to make the column worth saving. I made another trip to the salvage yard and for $46 just pulled another one. Got lucky and found one from a Chevy truck that was a manual floor shift, so no shifter base on the column. So a nice clean black column to start with.
                          It had a angled floor plate that was the opposite angle I need, so cut that off and will use the separate bolt in floor plate my other column came with.
                          Hung the horn ring on, just to get a look at it. Can't figure out where I stashed the '52 Pontiac horn button right now? Someplace safe I'm sure! This old Pontiac wheel is very large, and should make manual steering a breeze with the extra diameter to help with turning! Plus I think it looks cool, and it was inside the car when I bought it, so free!

                          Last edited by 1946Austin; October 10th, 2019, 09:26 AM.
                          Deaf Bob, SuperBuickGuy and 2 others like this.

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                          • #73

                            Re: 1939 Chevy coupe

                            Got the column drop built, and installed. Just 2"x 2" box tubing that will get covered later to hide all the ugly bolts and plugs on the steering column.



                            Also got the bolt on covers for the trans tunnel bent up and installed. Just the slightest curve to get clearance to the 700R4 trans.



                            And the master cylinder and Impreza brake pedal assembly done. The plate turned out to be stainless steel! Was a real booger to hole saw the center hole for the operating rod. The 6 other holes I drilled and tapped to make it stay on the firewall if I pull the pedal assembly, or the master any time.
                            Still need to figure out where to run the top braces for the bake pedal to? It's a long way to the dash, so I might have to make up a support under the dash to attach the top of the pedal assembly to. It's very solid, so wont need a huge amount of support. Might come off the firewall with an angle support up higher.



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                            • #74

                              Re: 1939 Chevy coupe

                              Decided to play with my trunk latch and the struts today I used body panel adhesive on the nutserts and installed them into the glass trunk lid to make that end of the strut mount more secure. Then moved on to the latch I removed from a canopy at the wrecking yard. I made up three plates, two for the catches, and one for the handle operator. Welded the catches to the plate with a tack and checked operation. It needed another 1/4" out so I cut it loose and tacked it further towards the edge. Mounted up both catches, and then pop riveted the operator to the center plate. Shortened the operating rods and redrilled the holes. Still need to drill for a couple clips to keep the rods on now that I know it works.





                              Started figuring out what I need to do to build my floor shifter. I'm going to use a spare Hurst shifter arm and then build up a mounting plate to pivot on, and a rod to go to the tranny to attach for shifting. I want it to have the look of a manual trans, as I'm not fond of the newer style shifters available.
                              STINEY and Deaf Bob like this.

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                              • #75

                                Re: 1939 Chevy coupe

                                Weather has been perfect for working on cars here, whether inside or outside. Running low to mid 60's for highs, so it's never too hot or too cold!
                                I got my other bucket seat modified and installed on the passenger side. The passenger seat has two pivot points, so it lays back, but 2nd pivot allows the seatback to go fully down and lay flat on the cushion for more room to the backseat area. Will make tossing things in the back a lot easier!



                                Then I got my shifter bracket built, and mounted to a slot I cut in the floor. A regular manual shifter boot will go over this later to hide the base plate.



                                The pivot point is under the floor, and I'll weld an extension on the Hurst shifter once I have the trans arm and can figure out how long to make the extension. I'll put a rod with a 3/8" heim on each end to adjust the position of the shifter. Still figuring out if I'll install a reverse lockout, or how to build it into this shifter.



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