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1939 Chevy coupe

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  • 1946Austin
    replied
    Took quite a long time, but finally got my replacement windshield half for my '39 Chev coupe. I guess the virus has caused a huge number of people to work on their cars, so the glass guys are swamped.
    I asked for the glass to be undersized, since the last one was so tight it barely went in, which caused a stress crack later. Unfortunately all they did was make the width 1/8" shorter, but didn't adjust top to bottom width. So once I overlaid the new glass on the old, I decided I needed to modify something, or figure out how to shrink the glass.
    Since sanding or grinding the glass without some sort of water cooled sander would likely have fatal results, I decided to modify the weatherstrip seal. I carefully pulled the lip back a couple inches at a time, and using my belt sander with a new 80 grit belt, I worked my way around the perimeter until I;d "shaved" the outside down a bit over 1/16" all over to reduce the total 1/8".
    After that I did the same soapy water spray on the weatherstrip, and with my pull line I pushed and worked the lip over the metal. Unlike the last time, the glass went in tightly, but I didn't need to pull it in the last bit with the garnish molding.
    I used my glass suction cups attached to the two halves to bump the halves left and right to ensure I got a decent gap between the glass, and away from the center strip retaining screws.

    It took a couple hours, but a lot of that was setup, and cleanup afterwards. Way better than the 4.5 hrs. it took the last go around!

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  • 1946Austin
    replied
    Originally posted by DanStokes View Post

    Having spent time on the Salt I have all kinds of horror stories that the guys tell. The way you get to keep bringing a car back is to totally disassemble and clean it after each meet, and to do it as soon as you get home. Salt can even get inside U-joints!

    Dan
    Yeah, it's not like driving on the beach and getting a little salt air! And going the speeds those cars can go, there's all sorts of pressure pushing salt into places we'd never imagine it could go.

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  • DanStokes
    replied
    [QUOTE=1946Austin;n1274502 But he said the salt is literally eating the car away! In just 6 years of running it there, the fenders, brackets, frame, and most metal parts are falling apart. Even with a pressure washing each time he gets home, it still eats everything up![/QUOTE]

    Having spent time on the Salt I have all kinds of horror stories that the guys tell. The way you get to keep bringing a car back is to totally disassemble and clean it after each meet, and to do it as soon as you get home. Salt can even get inside U-joints!

    Dan

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  • SuperBuickGuy
    replied
    Originally posted by 1946Austin View Post
    I know Ed isn't watching my posts as he said his wife does anything he needs done on the internet. He's old school, and no time for the internet.
    Found out while talking to him yesterday that we are both retired electricians, and both worked for the same companies, at the same time! One was a smaller contractor, and we were trying to figure out why we'd never met each other there? He worked days, and I worked swing, but I always visited with the dayshift guys while waiting to start my shift. Just don't remember each other?
    maybe nothing sparked your interest back then?
    perhaps you both weren't plugged in?
    maybe you both were on different frequencies?
    I'm sure eventually you'll illuminate what happened.

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  • 1946Austin
    replied
    I know Ed isn't watching my posts as he said his wife does anything he needs done on the internet. He's old school, and no time for the internet.
    Found out while talking to him yesterday that we are both retired electricians, and both worked for the same companies, at the same time! One was a smaller contractor, and we were trying to figure out why we'd never met each other there? He worked days, and I worked swing, but I always visited with the dayshift guys while waiting to start my shift. Just don't remember each other?

    Leave a comment:


  • SuperBuickGuy
    replied
    Originally posted by 1946Austin View Post
    But he said the salt is literally eating the car away! In just 6 years of running it there, the fenders, brackets, frame, and most metal parts are falling apart. Even with a pressure washing each time he gets home, it still eats everything up!
    whaa? salt eats metal? you'd think someone would have voted to make sure that doesn't happen anymore...

    The Corvette is being watched by the guy I bought it from - so I have to be careful posting (though finding that cut wire for the left tail light severely challenged that self-imposed limit)....

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  • 1946Austin
    replied
    I was invited to meet with a car club this morning, by a friend who knows me and the previous owner of my '39 Chev coupe. He told Ed he had a "surprise" for him, and to be sure he made it to breakfast today. Drove out to meet the guys, and Ed showed up late, so didn't get to see his reaction outside, but did see it inside. He was grinning when he saw me, and after saying hello he told me he was tickled to see his old '39 on the road, and done up in gasser style. He added that he was glad somebody got it who followed through with it, as he'd never have gotten it done himself. Another guy asked if he wanted his '39 back, but Ed said it was in good hands, and he couldn't afford it now.
    Ed is an old Bonneville racer who runs a '51 Chevy with a 301 straight six, and a lot of other work done to it. It runs 127 mph on the salt, and he's hoping to get it to 130 mph club the next trip down. He spun it out last year at over 100 mph when the clutch began to slip, and thinks it could be close to going 130. But he said the salt is literally eating the car away! In just 6 years of running it there, the fenders, brackets, frame, and most metal parts are falling apart. Even with a pressure washing each time he gets home, it still eats everything up!

    Leave a comment:


  • 1946Austin
    replied
    Been having issues with my fuel cell QD filler cap. Sometimes I wrestle with it for several minutes at the pump before I get it off. I finally got irritated enough to order a different filler with a 45 degree neck, and pipe thread billet aluminum cap. It arrived this morning, so figured I'd see what it took to replace the old cap. 12 bolts on the outside, with a ring on the inside that hols the 12 nuts. Fun!
    Easy to remove, and once I got to the last bolt I reached inside with my fingers to hold the ring as I removed the last bolt. It's a split ring, so I pulled it out to match it to the new filler, and all was good. Then I thought, "How do I hold the ring below, with a 1.25" filler neck on top?"
    No way to reach down the neck to hold it! I started one bolt with the new neck turned to one side, but when I tried to swivel it into place the ring moved too! Fought it for awhile, an then decided to bend up two pieces of iron tie wire to make hooks on each end that I'd use to hold the ring up while assembling the filler. I slid the gasket over the wires, and then the plate one wire at a time. Pulled the ring up, and held it with the wires in one hand as I started bolts with the other. A juggling act, and I kept thinking if I dropped it I'd be fishing it out of the fuel cell with my bare hands! Fortunately after a fair amount of struggling, and some cussing, I was able to get some screws started. Then I pulled hard on the iron wire to straighten it out and pull if free of the two holes.
    While the filler was out I bent the float arm up too, so it wont have over half a tank when it reads empty! Had to guess what it needed, so hope it leaves me a few gallons when it hits empty, instead of 7 gallons at empty!
    And a bonus of changing the filler, (besides easily filling gas!) is I can fill gas right up to the top of the tank now. The filler is about 4" tall, so wont shut the pump off before the tank is full.

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  • 1946Austin
    replied
    Originally posted by SuperBuickGuy View Post

    I'll have to try that, I've been waving a small US flag to get them to funnel to the front... but sometimes there needs to be added incentive...
    It's also easier in the "big cities" where they tend to herd up. Don't have to be as accurate with swarms of dead beats as you do in less populated ares!

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  • SuperBuickGuy
    replied
    Originally posted by 1946Austin View Post

    Yes, but easily lured into complacency by a little signal fire. Toss one out in front and they stop to watch it burn!
    I'll have to try that, I've been waving a small US flag to get them to funnel to the front... but sometimes there needs to be added incentive...

    Leave a comment:


  • 1946Austin
    replied
    Originally posted by SuperBuickGuy View Post

    they are fleet little m'fer's
    Yes, but easily lured into complacency by a little signal fire. Toss one out in front and they stop to watch it burn!

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  • SuperBuickGuy
    replied
    Originally posted by 1946Austin View Post

    Yeah, I'd give them a 5' lead, and then the car wanders around and I hit them off a little and just wound them. Irritating.
    they are fleet little m'fer's

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  • 1946Austin
    replied
    Originally posted by SuperBuickGuy View Post
    it's dang hard to properly lead a protester with loose suspension parts, glad to see you've got that fixed
    Yeah, I'd give them a 5' lead, and then the car wanders around and I hit them off a little and just wound them. Irritating.

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  • SuperBuickGuy
    replied
    it's dang hard to properly lead a protester with loose suspension parts, glad to see you've got that fixed

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  • 1946Austin
    replied
    Took a look into installing the electric door locks on the '39 today, and just stuffed them back in the bag for now. Where they attach to the locking mechanism is nearly impossible to access, and if I pull it all out to add the clamp from the kit, I'm unsure how to determine where to clamp it to ensure I can still have the solenoid sitting where it needs to go. So I shelved it for now.

    I decided I had enough miles to spend some time going over all the front suspension bolts. Most are grade 8 with locking nuts, so not much that can work loose, but I also had some grade 5 bolts that came with new parts, and wanted to change those out to grade 8.
    The Speedway disc brake kit had two 7/16NF locking nuts missing, and I forgot I never replaced those. When I saw they were still regular nuts I got grade 8 locknuts, and figured I'd replace them today. They hold the tierod brackets to the spindles, so pretty important!
    When I went to remove the nuts today they had backed off a good 1/8" from tight!! I was shocked to see this, and checked the other bolt that had a locking nut, and they were still tight. But I've had a little bit of "wandering" in my steering, and I bet this was the case. I replaced the nuts with the grade 8 locknuts, and put blue Loctite on all 4 nuts also, just for extra security!
    I also replaced all the 1/2NF U bolt nuts for the springs with grade 8 nuts, and Loctited them too. Never seen U bolts with grade 5 nuts before, and didn't like the looks of them for such a critical fastener.
    So with everything checked, tightened, Loctied, and changed; I took it for a short spin. The steering is noticeably crisper, and more precise, with no wandering going down the freeway. So I'm glad I took time to check everything after a few hundred miles!

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