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1939 Chevy coupe

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  • Beagle
    replied
    I think you just described somebody with "Borderline" disorder... Bi Polar on steroids. Sorry to hear that.

    I worked with stained glass for a while. We would fit and shape glass pieces with a wet diamond grit grinder. Tempered glass is a different animal - I've never tried it, but even OEM glass you can see on some older stuff where the edges were sanded smooth. Water hose drip and a belt sander may work fine - I'd practice on something disposable and use as much finesse as I could muster, very light touch. Every time I've messed with tempered glass it exploded, but that was trying to cut it which was just stupid on my part.

    detail that just came to mind. We would trace whatever shape the glass needed to be trimmed to onto the glass with a sharpie. The water from the grinder doesn't wash it off. Grind to the mark. The general idea was cut it close but leave some room for sneaking up on a good fit. If you got aggressive with the glass, particularly thin sections, it would break. Patience was the order of the day...

    I did a quick youtube search for grinding glass - clicking the link below will give you the results. Some interesting items showed up.

    https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q...523D92A041CE3B
    Last edited by Beagle; July 16, 2020, 06:01 AM.

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  • Deaf Bob
    replied
    I've cut bottles and made cups out of them.. Had a soft rubber drum that took rolls of grit. (sandpaper in a roll much like an empty toilet paper roll) hardness of the roll was how much you tightened the ends Too tight, the rolls exploded, usually ruining the cup..too loose it will slip or make waves.. Lots of fine dangerous grit.. It does take quite a bit of sanding to get the glass rounded so not to cut you as you drink.. As for the cutter, if the template was paper as the steel burn table was, tracking on the inside of the drawn line will make it smaller.. A bump on the table would jump the eye over the drawn line and the steel would be wrong. But if the templates were wood or something then you would be stuck with those measurements unless you made the template smaller..pretty poor customer service.

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  • 1946Austin
    replied
    So here's how my afternoon ended. I was asked by the guy who supplied the glass to call him when I got it installed, and let him know how it went, and if there were any issues. I've spoken with him often, and he's always been extremely nice, and very interested in wanting to provide a great product. He told me several times to let him know if there's any way he can help, even if it's just answering questions, or getting feedback. So I figured I'd give him a call to let him know how this went down.
    Told him the glass was still too large, and what I did to fix it. He said he "has no control over the size, as it's CNC cut from templates that have been used for years."
    I asked why (when I mentioned it was too large before) he told me he'd send them a note with the order "to make it slightly smaller length and width." I had told him it could be 1/4" narrower, and 1/8" shorter.
    He told me he never said that, and said all he could do was ask them to try and find a smaller piece, if they could. Well I was puzzled, but not the end of the world. I then asked him out of curiosity if the glass could be sanded or polished on the edges to reduce the size? He told me it didn't need to be, as it was surrounded with rubber. I tried to explain I just meant, could it be sanded or polished to reduce the dimensions?
    At this point he began screaming at me, telling me there's no way he can special order glass, as it's made in Taiwan, and he has no control over what they do! He went on yelling and telling me if I wanted special size glass it would take 18 months to get it, and I'd probably not want my car waiting that long to drive it. Then he said in 40 years of business he'd never had any glass that didn't fit. Never had anyone ever complain about his glass not fitting, and never had anyone ever break glass trying to put it in!
    I kept attempting to interrupt to remind him he'd asked me to call and give him feedback, and had even requested I talk to others to see if they'd had issues, so he might have the glass adjusted to be a better fit. But there was no stopping his ranting, until he was done. When he stopped I tried to explain I was merely calling to tell him how it went. But before I could finish my sentence he tells me he knows exactly why I called, and begins to rant again. I finally just hung up my cell phone and gave up.
    About 30 seconds later my home phone rings, and it's him again. He starts up once more ranting about how long his hours and days are, and how he has so much going on, and doesn't need people he's trying to help giving him crap. Then suddenly he gets soft spoken, and says, I sincerely mean this. If you have any glass questions, or need any help with glass, call me and I'll try to answer whatever you need. ???????????
    At that point I was once again as shocked as I was with his explosive rant. I was speechless, and wasn't sure what to say. So I simply hung up again without responding. It was the weirdest experience I've ever had with a company supplying car parts. I felt extremely uncomfortable for hours after the calls.

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  • 1946Austin
    replied
    Took quite a long time, but finally got my replacement windshield half for my '39 Chev coupe. I guess the virus has caused a huge number of people to work on their cars, so the glass guys are swamped.
    I asked for the glass to be undersized, since the last one was so tight it barely went in, which caused a stress crack later. Unfortunately all they did was make the width 1/8" shorter, but didn't adjust top to bottom width. So once I overlaid the new glass on the old, I decided I needed to modify something, or figure out how to shrink the glass.
    Since sanding or grinding the glass without some sort of water cooled sander would likely have fatal results, I decided to modify the weatherstrip seal. I carefully pulled the lip back a couple inches at a time, and using my belt sander with a new 80 grit belt, I worked my way around the perimeter until I;d "shaved" the outside down a bit over 1/16" all over to reduce the total 1/8".
    After that I did the same soapy water spray on the weatherstrip, and with my pull line I pushed and worked the lip over the metal. Unlike the last time, the glass went in tightly, but I didn't need to pull it in the last bit with the garnish molding.
    I used my glass suction cups attached to the two halves to bump the halves left and right to ensure I got a decent gap between the glass, and away from the center strip retaining screws.

    It took a couple hours, but a lot of that was setup, and cleanup afterwards. Way better than the 4.5 hrs. it took the last go around!

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  • 1946Austin
    replied
    Originally posted by DanStokes View Post

    Having spent time on the Salt I have all kinds of horror stories that the guys tell. The way you get to keep bringing a car back is to totally disassemble and clean it after each meet, and to do it as soon as you get home. Salt can even get inside U-joints!

    Dan
    Yeah, it's not like driving on the beach and getting a little salt air! And going the speeds those cars can go, there's all sorts of pressure pushing salt into places we'd never imagine it could go.

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  • DanStokes
    replied
    [QUOTE=1946Austin;n1274502 But he said the salt is literally eating the car away! In just 6 years of running it there, the fenders, brackets, frame, and most metal parts are falling apart. Even with a pressure washing each time he gets home, it still eats everything up![/QUOTE]

    Having spent time on the Salt I have all kinds of horror stories that the guys tell. The way you get to keep bringing a car back is to totally disassemble and clean it after each meet, and to do it as soon as you get home. Salt can even get inside U-joints!

    Dan

    Leave a comment:


  • SuperBuickGuy
    replied
    Originally posted by 1946Austin View Post
    I know Ed isn't watching my posts as he said his wife does anything he needs done on the internet. He's old school, and no time for the internet.
    Found out while talking to him yesterday that we are both retired electricians, and both worked for the same companies, at the same time! One was a smaller contractor, and we were trying to figure out why we'd never met each other there? He worked days, and I worked swing, but I always visited with the dayshift guys while waiting to start my shift. Just don't remember each other?
    maybe nothing sparked your interest back then?
    perhaps you both weren't plugged in?
    maybe you both were on different frequencies?
    I'm sure eventually you'll illuminate what happened.

    Leave a comment:


  • 1946Austin
    replied
    I know Ed isn't watching my posts as he said his wife does anything he needs done on the internet. He's old school, and no time for the internet.
    Found out while talking to him yesterday that we are both retired electricians, and both worked for the same companies, at the same time! One was a smaller contractor, and we were trying to figure out why we'd never met each other there? He worked days, and I worked swing, but I always visited with the dayshift guys while waiting to start my shift. Just don't remember each other?

    Leave a comment:


  • SuperBuickGuy
    replied
    Originally posted by 1946Austin View Post
    But he said the salt is literally eating the car away! In just 6 years of running it there, the fenders, brackets, frame, and most metal parts are falling apart. Even with a pressure washing each time he gets home, it still eats everything up!
    whaa? salt eats metal? you'd think someone would have voted to make sure that doesn't happen anymore...

    The Corvette is being watched by the guy I bought it from - so I have to be careful posting (though finding that cut wire for the left tail light severely challenged that self-imposed limit)....

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  • 1946Austin
    replied
    I was invited to meet with a car club this morning, by a friend who knows me and the previous owner of my '39 Chev coupe. He told Ed he had a "surprise" for him, and to be sure he made it to breakfast today. Drove out to meet the guys, and Ed showed up late, so didn't get to see his reaction outside, but did see it inside. He was grinning when he saw me, and after saying hello he told me he was tickled to see his old '39 on the road, and done up in gasser style. He added that he was glad somebody got it who followed through with it, as he'd never have gotten it done himself. Another guy asked if he wanted his '39 back, but Ed said it was in good hands, and he couldn't afford it now.
    Ed is an old Bonneville racer who runs a '51 Chevy with a 301 straight six, and a lot of other work done to it. It runs 127 mph on the salt, and he's hoping to get it to 130 mph club the next trip down. He spun it out last year at over 100 mph when the clutch began to slip, and thinks it could be close to going 130. But he said the salt is literally eating the car away! In just 6 years of running it there, the fenders, brackets, frame, and most metal parts are falling apart. Even with a pressure washing each time he gets home, it still eats everything up!

    Leave a comment:


  • 1946Austin
    replied
    Been having issues with my fuel cell QD filler cap. Sometimes I wrestle with it for several minutes at the pump before I get it off. I finally got irritated enough to order a different filler with a 45 degree neck, and pipe thread billet aluminum cap. It arrived this morning, so figured I'd see what it took to replace the old cap. 12 bolts on the outside, with a ring on the inside that hols the 12 nuts. Fun!
    Easy to remove, and once I got to the last bolt I reached inside with my fingers to hold the ring as I removed the last bolt. It's a split ring, so I pulled it out to match it to the new filler, and all was good. Then I thought, "How do I hold the ring below, with a 1.25" filler neck on top?"
    No way to reach down the neck to hold it! I started one bolt with the new neck turned to one side, but when I tried to swivel it into place the ring moved too! Fought it for awhile, an then decided to bend up two pieces of iron tie wire to make hooks on each end that I'd use to hold the ring up while assembling the filler. I slid the gasket over the wires, and then the plate one wire at a time. Pulled the ring up, and held it with the wires in one hand as I started bolts with the other. A juggling act, and I kept thinking if I dropped it I'd be fishing it out of the fuel cell with my bare hands! Fortunately after a fair amount of struggling, and some cussing, I was able to get some screws started. Then I pulled hard on the iron wire to straighten it out and pull if free of the two holes.
    While the filler was out I bent the float arm up too, so it wont have over half a tank when it reads empty! Had to guess what it needed, so hope it leaves me a few gallons when it hits empty, instead of 7 gallons at empty!
    And a bonus of changing the filler, (besides easily filling gas!) is I can fill gas right up to the top of the tank now. The filler is about 4" tall, so wont shut the pump off before the tank is full.

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  • 1946Austin
    replied
    Originally posted by SuperBuickGuy View Post

    I'll have to try that, I've been waving a small US flag to get them to funnel to the front... but sometimes there needs to be added incentive...
    It's also easier in the "big cities" where they tend to herd up. Don't have to be as accurate with swarms of dead beats as you do in less populated ares!

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  • SuperBuickGuy
    replied
    Originally posted by 1946Austin View Post

    Yes, but easily lured into complacency by a little signal fire. Toss one out in front and they stop to watch it burn!
    I'll have to try that, I've been waving a small US flag to get them to funnel to the front... but sometimes there needs to be added incentive...

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  • 1946Austin
    replied
    Originally posted by SuperBuickGuy View Post

    they are fleet little m'fer's
    Yes, but easily lured into complacency by a little signal fire. Toss one out in front and they stop to watch it burn!

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  • SuperBuickGuy
    replied
    Originally posted by 1946Austin View Post

    Yeah, I'd give them a 5' lead, and then the car wanders around and I hit them off a little and just wound them. Irritating.
    they are fleet little m'fer's

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