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1939 Chevy coupe

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  • 1946Austin
    replied
    Alternator failed the test. Amazing a brand new appearing alternator, still in the box failed. Guess it will become a core trade in now, in case I need one.

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  • 1946Austin
    replied
    After rebuilding the double doors to my shop this morning, and replacing the transparent fiberglass panels with corrugated galvanized steel, I took a closer look at the '39's alternator. I found a 63 a. 10SI alternator I had NIB here, and thought maybe I'd try it. Not sure why it was here, or where it came from?
    I started the car, and put my Fluke volt-ohm meter on the output terminal and got 14.3 v., so the volt meter is reading closer to 15 v., and must be a little high. Decided since I had the spare I'd still give it a try and see how it worked.
    Bolted it on, and started the car again. Seems the reason it's not on one of my cars was obvious. It read 12.8 v. on the gauge, and with the Fluke it's barely over 12.2v., which is battery voltage running! Swapped the old alternator back on, and I'll take this one over to one of the parts stores and see if they can test it, to see what's going on.

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  • 1946Austin
    replied
    Drove the '39 over 300 miles today, and it was great! Hotter than heck here today, but she never got over 180 degrees, even a few times sitting in traffic. Got a little over 20 mpg average, so I'm tickled with it. I need to get a bunch of miles on it before the end of the month so I feel confident taking it on a 900 mile trip.
    I do need to replace the alternator before the trip, as it's charging a little high. It runs about 14.5 vdc, and I think it might be getting close to quitting. So I'll go ahead and replace it before it completely goes bad and fries my battery.

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  • 1946Austin
    replied
    Just found this picture I took a few years ago. This is my buddy's '40 Chev coupe, with 383 SBC. But back in 1968 it was my '40 Chev coupe with a 413 Mopar, Torqueflite, and rear axle, all out of a '59 Imperial. Back when I owned it I had a '47 Ford transverse spring front axle, and it was a gasser. Now it's more of a low rider show car. I sold it to Steve back in 1973, and he finally had it built aout 5 years ago.

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  • 1946Austin
    replied
    Originally posted by Beagle View Post
    2x4 and forstner bit?
    Well that's too easy! Sounds like a great idea. I can just drop them in the hole and use my arbor press to compress them so I can remove the clips.

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  • Beagle
    replied
    2x4 and forstner bit?

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  • 1946Austin
    replied
    It's alive! What a PITA those valve adjustments were!
    I set the rockers at zero lash cold, so after adding coolant and firing it off, I could immediately tell they were too tight. Not enough oiling on the rockers, so I shut it off and began readjusting them while the engine was hot. The lash was probably close to a full turn tight, so backed them all back to zero, and added 1/8 turn preload. Restarted it, and she sounds great again!
    Putting the old lifters away and see if this winter I can make up a fixture to hold the roller lifters while I compress them to disassemble and clean them. Need some sort of a flat plate, and tube to hold the roller end, so I can compress them while holding them straight up. Just a winter project when I'm bored and need something to play with.

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  • 1946Austin
    replied
    Got a 7:00 a.m. start to avoid the heat in the shop, and got all the .550" lift valve springs installed. Also got the forged steel roller rockers swapped on, and adjusted. Did the roller rockers as an upgrade, since it was this far apart, and they're not that expensive. By not going full roller rockers I can still use my old school valve covers with the steel roller long slot rockers.





    Maybe if it's as cool tomorrow as forecast, I can get the intake back on and button it up.

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  • 1946Austin
    replied
    Engine is torn down as much as I can to this point. Got the intake off, and no visible lifter issues. Guessing maybe some debris got into one lifter causing it to not pump up. Have the new lifters soaking in Marvel Mystery Oil for a few days until my new valve springs arrive.
    I did get a chance to fix a stripped thread on the intake at the thermostat housing. I had to use an over length bolt to get down to good threads before, so I drilled and tapped for a helicoil insert, and fixed that while it was off. Should have my parts Fri. or Sat. and then I can start swapping valve springs, and reassemble. I'm going to swap to steel roller tip rockers while I've got it apart also. Might as well make it a little better while I've got it this far apart.

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  • DanStokes
    replied
    Originally posted by Beagle View Post
    I had a Buick 231 once that ticked almost like a rod knock - turned out to be just a little a chunk missing off of one tooth on the cam's timing gear... so I replaced it. With a 350 SBC... never ran better. How did you come up with #6 being the culprit?
    The Buick V6 (both even fire and odd fire) were famous for timing chain issues. Change it out the set and make sure the new set has a steel cam gear and they'd run forever. Did plenty of them in my Buick dealership days.

    Dan

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  • Deaf Bob
    replied
    My first real headers were on the 57.. Don't count the LUV.. Had one port blown and to my deaf ears it sounded like a rod knocking on the pan..it was a mess!

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  • 1946Austin
    replied
    Originally posted by SuperBuickGuy View Post
    I ever tell you about the time I thought I had a valve problem and it was loose torque converter bolts? I said a few words, maybe more than a few..... that said, GM rollers lifters can have issues and those are well documented.
    I was thinking it was a loose header bolt, and it was an exhaust tick. But nothing loose, and of course adjusting the rocker told me I was on the right track. Just hate having to pull the intake, but no getting around that at after not finding anything else to cause it.

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  • 1946Austin
    replied
    It was pretty easy to determine it was #6 cylinder. Started out using my stethoscope, and then put my open top valve cover on and began adjusting as I ran the engine. The click goes away as it comes off idle, bu it also begins to go away if I back off the lash on #6 cyl. exhaust valve. But at a certain point before it fully goes away the rocker begins to click instead. And if I shut the engine off and check lash on that rocker it's way too loose to get it to stop clicking.
    I really think a lifter isn't pumping up at idle, or has some restriction in the oil passage. I suppose it could be in the OEM lifter retainer plate, but I think that's unlikely. More likely it's a bad lifter. Kinda kick myself because I had the new Elgin lifters, but was told these lifters were new too. So I figured I'd keep mine, and use what was in it. I should have used mine, and put what was in it in the package, and put them away, never to need them!

    I'd heard that OEM lifters had some issues, but wasn't sure if these were OEM, or just "OEM style". I've had good results with Elgin, and they're one of the largest lifter manufacturers in the world. They supply to most of the major cam makers.

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  • SuperBuickGuy
    replied
    I ever tell you about the time I thought I had a valve problem and it was loose torque converter bolts? I said a few words, maybe more than a few..... that said, GM rollers lifters can have issues and those are well documented.

    Leave a comment:


  • Beagle
    replied
    I had a Buick 231 once that ticked almost like a rod knock - turned out to be just a little a chunk missing off of one tooth on the cam's timing gear... so I replaced it. With a 350 SBC... never ran better. How did you come up with #6 being the culprit?

    Leave a comment:

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