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The "Whatever" Project

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  • Originally posted by Russell View Post

    Let's make some more assumptions! There are 12 slots and 10 have dots so it was cast in October 1987? You think the guy who's job it it to punch the date stamp keeps up with what month it is?
    Russell, where on the transmission is that located? Mine needs some grunge removed, and maybe if it's on every one I'll be even closer to the ultimate answer of Life, the Universe and Everything. Or at least what year mine is definitively...

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    • Now on to today's progress: there was none . Overdid it yesterday and the mind was willing, but the body wasn't. Ever notice that those tasks we could do 30 years ago in an hour or so, now takes days, body allowing? Thankfully tomorrow family is visiting so I have an excuse for another day with no progress.

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      • Main case, passenger side about the middle way up in front of the fill plug.
        http://www.bangshift.com/forum/forum...-consolidation

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        • Originally posted by Russell View Post
          Main case, passenger side about the middle way up in front of the fill plug.
          Thanks I'll take a look this afternoon.

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          • Looked at the "calendar" and saw a 93 inside the circle, and 2 of those spaces with dots. So it appears that the transmission is 1993 February manufactured. Lines up well with the information I have. Now if I feel up to it tomorrow or Friday I'll see what needs to be done to make it work.

            I did fix my 20 odd years old Ryobi chop saw today, so not a complete waste. Ryobi and Home Depot say that it's so old there are no longer parts available. However my 5 year old Ryobi sliding compound wood miter saw seems to have the same motor. And I only needed new brushes. So I pulled out one of the brushes and viola it was the same. Better yet it's got a number on it. Looking that up on the web, it seems like all the power tools in the world of similar design just happen to use the same ones. Went to the local Ace hardware and got 2 new brushes. Chop saw back up and running

            Today was good!

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            • Originally posted by dave.g.in.gansevoort View Post
              Looked at the "calendar" and saw a 93 inside the circle, and 2 of those spaces with dots. So it appears that the transmission is 1993 February manufactured. Lines up well with the information I have. Now if I feel up to it tomorrow or Friday I'll see what needs to be done to make it work.

              I did fix my 20 odd years old Ryobi chop saw today, so not a complete waste. Ryobi and Home Depot say that it's so old there are no longer parts available. However my 5 year old Ryobi sliding compound wood miter saw seems to have the same motor. And I only needed new brushes. So I pulled out one of the brushes and viola it was the same. Better yet it's got a number on it. Looking that up on the web, it seems like all the power tools in the world of similar design just happen to use the same ones. Went to the local Ace hardware and got 2 new brushes. Chop saw back up and running

              Today was good!
              I’ve put brushes from 40 year old Black and Decker into Sears saws. Same thing. Also the worm drive and it’s button.

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              • Originally posted by Deaf Bob View Post

                I’ve put brushes from 40 year old Black and Decker into Sears saws. Same thing. Also the worm drive and it’s button.
                You know I looked at the 9 inch grinder I bought in 75, and I bet it's got the same brushes also. Never thought to check it out as I have spares for it, bought roughly 30 odd years ago.

                Which brings up another thought: I have a number of old metal body B&D power tools and they are all in good to excellent condition. Why do we as consumers tolerate modern plastic throw away tools that are no cheaper in real dollars? (Using an inflation adjustment app for cost comparisons)

                Even the old chop saw was made in metal. The base is cast iron. When was the last time you saw a chop saw with that versus most if not all having a stamped metal base. Okay enough of a little rant for now...

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                • Originally posted by dave.g.in.gansevoort View Post

                  When was the last time you saw a chop saw with that versus most if not all having a stamped metal base. Okay enough of a little rant for now...
                  Grasshopper, you have much to learn. One starts such rants with "Hell, when I was a boy......" I know you're new to being old.

                  Dan

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                  • Originally posted by DanStokes View Post

                    Grasshopper, you have much to learn. One starts such rants with "Hell, when I was a boy......" I know you're new to being old.

                    Dan
                    I'm fighting it! I won't grow up, I won't!

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                    • Originally posted by dave.g.in.gansevoort View Post

                      I'm fighting it! I won't grow up, I won't!
                      I think Dan converted a wood chop saw to metal.

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                      • Originally posted by Deaf Bob View Post

                        I think Dan converted a wood chop saw to metal.
                        I believe Dan is part Scots, and by nature thrifty, so that doesn't surprise me. He also likes to reduce, reuse and recycle. 30 years give or take 5 background...

                        Remember, hot rodders are some of the best and first at recycling stuff.

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                        • Originally posted by Deaf Bob View Post

                          I think Dan converted a wood chop saw to metal.
                          Not exactly, Bob. I just put my wood chop saw to work cutting up aluminum which they do just fine as long as it can't bind on the blade (remember the finger incident?). I use the table saw all the time to cut up aluminum and I can get straight cuts in aluminum sheet that way given that I don't have a sheer.

                          Dan

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                          • 1st an aside regarding the brushes and the chop saw. My 47 year old B&D mankiller 9 inch disc grinder uses the same brushes! Now I'm on a quest to find out just how many electric power tools use/used that same brush. Just saying...

                            Now on to today's progress. I was able to get into the garage today for a little bit, the back was behaving. So I picked up the T5 transmission from the workbench with the engine hoist (hey I learn eventually), and slung it into place behind the engine. As mentioned by many, it was a half inch too long, all of the excess length in the pilot bearing nose on the input shaft.

                            So what to do? Should I just shorten it and the throwout bearing collar the requisite amounts, essentially matching the input end of the T10 shorty transmission I have? I'm not using the T10 because it lacks reverse remember.

                            Or a spacer plate? I can do it a couple of ways. A half inch spacer between the transmission and the bellhousing, made or bought. A quarter inch engine plate and another quarter inch spacer to make the total add up to a half inch between the engine and bellhousing. This could be relatively easy to do, as the alignment of the engine to the bellhousing revolves around the block dowel pins.

                            Or change the input shaft for one that is the correct length and other dimensions, but I don't have a clue what else would need to be changed. At that point it might be easier/cheaper to get a wc v8 T5 and swap the shifter parts.

                            Click image for larger version

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ID:	1306652 It certainly looks like it will work eventually. That shifter location is almost exactly where I would design it to be, if I were to design the parts myself from scratch. Oh well it's moving forward...

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                            • I do believe it's pretty easy to switch the top cover and tail housing to move the shifter around. Are you sure the V8 t5 has the same input shaft length as the T10? For some reason I thought they were shorter, but that may have been ford.

                              What about getting the correct depth bell? If you were using a SBF I have an extra Foxbody bell housing.
                              http://www.bangshift.com/forum/forum...-consolidation

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by Russell View Post
                                I do believe it's pretty easy to switch the top cover and tail housing to move the shifter around. Are you sure the V8 t5 has the same input shaft length as the T10? For some reason I thought they were shorter, but that may have been ford.

                                What about getting the correct depth bell? If you were using a SBF I have an extra Foxbody bell housing.
                                It would probably be easier packaging a 289/302 in the Whatever project. Distributor at the front, slightly narrower I believe, and as I seem to remember someone makes a water pump that shortens them up also. But I have the 327 (it was free ), and I believe the v8 T5 has the same dimensions as a T10. BTW the S10 T5 was free also. I'm working on a sort of small budget so lots of the parts are freebies or close to it. Even the quick change was free. I did have to replace the side tubes and get new axles, but that's a far cry cheaper than getting a new rear axle of any type.

                                Now if someone should want to give me a complete drivetrain from a 5 liter 5 speed Fox body Mustang, I certainly wouldn't refuse it, and would make it work. Just saying...

                                Man I can get sidetracked so easily! From what I have gleaned so far in researching T5 transmissions, the 4.3 liter v6 t5, with its bellhousing would likely bolt right up to the sbc. It seems those are few and far between. And would have better gearing. Oh well beggars can't be choosers.

                                I did a little cogitating and ruminating over the idea of going to a block plate. I need to use up a half inch to use the transmission I have as is. Early on I made a block plate of aluminum tooling plate, 1/4 inch thick. I can cut another piece of 1/4 inch aluminum tooling plate to the same shape as the bellhousing flange. Think block plate for an ansen scattershield. Now I can contour the first plate and make it hold the back of the engine up. I get the half inch, and more important, if I were to go to a v8 T5 I could just remove the bellhousing shape plate and use an extended pilot bearing like done for a scattershield when added to a bellhousing not originally designed to use it.

                                I'm not sure that was clearly stated. Hey I'm an engineer after all...and it's getting past my bedtime. I'm tiredand getting punchy.

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