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The "Whatever" Project

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  • So call me lazy-cheap! I'm going to just cut the pilot bearing nose to the correct length to get it to fit. I've got a lathe and I'm not afraid to use it! .

    So with all the measuring and research and cogitating on the issue, that's my answer. Speedway has a clutch disc that will fit a 153 tooth flywheel with a 10.5 inch pressure plate, so good enough. Remember better is the enemy of good enough after all. It's time to get the drivetrain in and ready for the next step

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    • Cheap maybe, lazy doesn't involve a lathe! Take pictures for us!
      http://www.bangshift.com/forum/forum...-consolidation

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      • Originally posted by Russell View Post
        Cheap maybe, lazy doesn't involve a lathe! Take pictures for us!
        Actually I prefer thrifty. Pictures tomorrow or Wednesday. Wasn't productive today. 3 trips across town, and it's at least 40 minutes each round trip, for groceries and printer ink. I'm buying one of those new tank job printers. Oh well tomorrow is another day...

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        • You can be thrifty, I will be cheap!
          http://www.bangshift.com/forum/forum...-consolidation

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          • Originally posted by Russell View Post
            You can be thrifty, I will be cheap!
            Let's both be thrifty and let Dan be cheap!

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            • Wussed out. Ordered a spacer plate from Vintage Metalworks that uses up the half inch difference between an S10 T5 and a normal GM transmission. I figured by the time I procured more aluminum tooling plate and the necessary bits and bobs that I just know would be needed, that I'd be much deeper into my wallet than the cost of the adapter. Also being lazy, it saves me having to do any modifications to the transmission. And if I decide on a different transmission down the road, I just have to get a half inch longer transmission driveshaft yolk.

              So after that phone call, I was directed to another supplier for a clutch disc that will fit. So now the only thing left to procure is a new flywheel. My bellhousing only fits 153 tooth flywheels, and I'm building a light car, so next is an aluminum flywheel. I only have an old 168 (?) Cast iron truck flywheel with nothing else so this is mostly $$$$$$$ I have to spend regardless. Oh well the Italian side is controlling now!

              Also got sidetracked putting a new base together for my neighbor's anvil. So far I have the wood ready. Now I have to spend some time restoring the anvil. It's currently in front of the welding bench and I have some things that need heating and beating, so kindof a necessary diversion. And yes someone did break this anvil. One of its feet was busted off and is gone. I'm going to use some scrap iron and recreate it and weld it all together. 2 big propane blowtorches and specialty rod, and it should be good. Now I have to get something to pack it in on the cool down to help resist cracking.

              Bob and I both have said we'd like to find the person who broke it. You know why...

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              • Here's a question for the wizened denizens of these annals of internal combustion and mechanical marvels. (That sentence would have gotten me another a+ from my expository writing instructor). The Whatever project should weigh between 1700 and 2000 pounds. I'm using so called metric calipers on all 4 corners. 2.5 inch standard front and whatever the standard bore is for the metric e-brake calipers in the rear. I'm thinking that I can use a 1 inch bore dual master cylinder and will be using a 6 to 1 pedal ratio. I'd appreciate comments and options if I'm on or off here. I've got time to work on this still so a general discussion will help. Thanks

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                • Originally posted by dave.g.in.gansevoort View Post
                  Here's a question for the wizened denizens of these annals of internal combustion and mechanical marvels. (That sentence would have gotten me another a+ from my expository writing instructor). The Whatever project should weigh between 1700 and 2000 pounds. I'm using so called metric calipers on all 4 corners. 2.5 inch standard front and whatever the standard bore is for the metric e-brake calipers in the rear. I'm thinking that I can use a 1 inch bore dual master cylinder and will be using a 6 to 1 pedal ratio. I'd appreciate comments and options if I'm on or off here. I've got time to work on this still so a general discussion will help. Thanks
                  I'd call Dave G - he'll figure it out. Sounds like an engineer problem to me.

                  Dan

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                  • He only thinks he's an engineer because he and Peter Hutchins got to drive a locomotive back in 92.

                    Seriously though I have an been doing sums and cyphers and came up with the following: 6:1 pedal ratio, 1 inch bore master cylinder. Assume 100 pounds force on the pedal. That's 600 pounds force on the master cylinder push rod. 1 inch bore master cylinder has an area of 1^2*pi, or 0.7854 in sq area. This results in a cylinder out pressure of 600/0.7854 or 764 psi.

                    A standard GM metric caliper has an area of 4.9 in sq, so caliper clamping force on the front will be 3750 pounds force. The rears have less area due to the e-brake mechanism. And I don't know that number.

                    So hence the question. Any thoughts?

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                    • Originally posted by DanStokes View Post

                      I'd call Dave G - he'll figure it out. Sounds like an engineer problem to me.

                      Dan
                      Originally posted by dave.g.in.gansevoort View Post
                      He only thinks he's an engineer because he and Peter Hutchins got to drive a locomotive back in 92.

                      Seriously though I have an been doing sums and cyphers and came up with the following: 6:1 pedal ratio, 1 inch bore master cylinder. Assume 100 pounds force on the pedal. That's 600 pounds force on the master cylinder push rod. 1 inch bore master cylinder has an area of 1^2*pi, or 0.7854 in sq area. This results in a cylinder out pressure of 600/0.7854 or 764 psi.

                      A standard GM metric caliper has an area of 4.9 in sq, so caliper clamping force on the front will be 3750 pounds force. The rears have less area due to the e-brake mechanism. And I don't know that number.

                      So hence the question. Any thoughts?
                      Zzzzzzzz
                      Doing it all wrong since 1966

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                      • See Dan! I knock them out even at long range...

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                        • Well hell, do it the way real men do it...
                          Trial and error and error and error...

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                          • Originally posted by Deaf Bob View Post
                            Well hell, do it the way real men do it...
                            Trial and error and error and error...
                            It's not trial and error. It's re-engineering! That way I can say I never make mistakes, I just repeat the design process...

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                            • Originally posted by dave.g.in.gansevoort View Post

                              It's not trial and error. It's re-engineering! That way I can say I never make mistakes, I just repeat the design process...
                              By that standard I've repeated the design process pretty much continuously.

                              Dan

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                              • Originally posted by dave.g.in.gansevoort View Post

                                It's not trial and error. It's re-engineering! That way I can say I never make mistakes, I just repeat the design process...
                                and why we're always surprised when a motor we rebuilt actually runs.
                                Doing it all wrong since 1966

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