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The "Whatever" Project

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  • dave.g.in.gansevoort
    replied
    Another day, another project untouched. My back is still uncooperative. So what do I do to occupy the time? Order parts! Well, at least that's what I intended to do. Got a list made.

    53-56 Ford F100 kingpin kit
    steel steering wheel hub with 7 degree taper
    6 blade expanding reamer to clean up axle eyes
    seatbelt as discussed in the last post
    exhaust pipe bends, Speedway has an assortment
    new rear rotors and calipers, 11.75 inch diameter 1 inch thick rotors, GM metric e-brake calipers
    7/8 od x1/2 id dom tubing for tie rod, drag link, and some other links in the suspension
    butcher block counter top for lathe

    I suppose I could go on and on until tomorrow or Thursday but this is all I'm going to splurge on this week. Good thing I have an understanding significant other...

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  • dave.g.in.gansevoort
    replied
    Things are still on hold. Trick back is starting to respond to the drugs, AND lots of nothing doing. Ordering parts instead. Kingpins, batwings, old Ford spring perches, a seatbelt for a very specific buckle.

    Okay you say, a very specific buckle? Yes! Maggie still needs assistance and frequently needs a gait belt. You've seen them, heavy strap with a sliding sort of buckle system that is either too tight or too loose. And another design uses Velcro, which is a good way to get there, but it is time consuming and when my back is giving me fits, not fun to adjust.

    So what is the solution? Add a modern seatbelt pushbutton buckle. Now you just adjust the belt, and on and off becomes a push of the button. And maybe my design hasn't been thought of yet. Patentable? Maybe...

    Leave a comment:


  • dave.g.in.gansevoort
    replied
    Originally posted by DanStokes View Post

    Must have paint! Wipe it down with something nasty (carb cleaner, lacquer thinner, etc) and brush on some Rustoleum Machine Gray. It'll flow out pretty well and will keep the rust bugs away. Not all paint has to be sprayed - I did the roll cage in Mutt using the above method (but in black) and it looks good.
    Have I ever told you just how much I hate painting? Machine gray sounds like a good fit. Way back when I worked for Lenox Machine, all of our sheeters were painted with gray paint. So it would be a throwback for me. And brush and roller was what we used to paint... okay so you convinced me

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  • DanStokes
    replied
    Originally posted by dave.g.in.gansevoort View Post

    It's not! Yet! Needs more cowbell...

    No, not that! It's going to get a concrete mass in the bottom between the legs. So there's going to be angle iron between the legs side to side, some sheetmetal forming a pan. Then a bag of concrete, the type where you just wet it and let it set up. Alex thinks it needs to be painted, but you know me and paint...
    Must have paint! Wipe it down with something nasty (carb cleaner, lacquer thinner, etc) and brush on some Rustoleum Machine Gray. It'll flow out pretty well and will keep the rust bugs away. Not all paint has to be sprayed - I did the roll cage in Mutt using the above method (but in black) and it looks good.

    Leave a comment:


  • dave.g.in.gansevoort
    replied
    Originally posted by DanStokes View Post

    I'll believe you. The new one looks like a winner though I'm not sure that stand is sturdy enough!! (sarcasm emoji.....)
    It's not! Yet! Needs more cowbell...

    No, not that! It's going to get a concrete mass in the bottom between the legs. So there's going to be angle iron between the legs side to side, some sheetmetal forming a pan. Then a bag of concrete, the type where you just wet it and let it set up. Alex thinks it needs to be painted, but you know me and paint...

    Leave a comment:


  • DanStokes
    replied
    Originally posted by dave.g.in.gansevoort View Post

    The other 3 consists of a 40s era Delta Double Duty Wood and very light duty metal lathe, a teensy tiny Craftsman lathe that's not really good for what we like making, and a Unimat sudo-jeweler's lathe that's good for making little itsy bitsy things.

    The Delta was only purchased to turn wood. It'll drill metal stuff sort of. I looked into getting the metal cutting attachment, and it was a no go. Either buy a complete lathe already set up with the metal cutting attachment or spend just as much for a questionable condition attachment. And I still wouldn't have been able to have a power feed. Oh, and it's headed for the nephew's garage when he gets it built. It was his grandfather's.

    The Craftsman thing was made in, of all places, Ann Arbor decades ago. And I wouldn't subject you to thinking that it's a useful tool. It's in need of a complete refurbishment, assuming that I can find the parts. The only reason why I'm going to do that is because it came from a favorite uncle.

    And the Unimat. Well, if you were to make slot cars, not real cars, it might be useful. I typically set it up as a precision drill press for tiny stuff, like the sampling devices that I designed for DEC.

    Hence, the Atlas bench lathe. You'll thank me for not saddling you with tools that just plain don't cut it. Next time we're on the phone again I'll tell you more.
    I'll believe you. The new one looks like a winner though I'm not sure that stand is sturdy enough!! (sarcasm emoji.....)

    Leave a comment:


  • dave.g.in.gansevoort
    replied
    Originally posted by DanStokes View Post

    I tried that once. Didn't last.

    Why don't you sell me one of your old ones and a bit of tooling? I don't need much but there are times...... (I really hanker for a Bridgeport)
    The other 3 consists of a 40s era Delta Double Duty Wood and very light duty metal lathe, a teensy tiny Craftsman lathe that's not really good for what we like making, and a Unimat sudo-jeweler's lathe that's good for making little itsy bitsy things.

    The Delta was only purchased to turn wood. It'll drill metal stuff sort of. I looked into getting the metal cutting attachment, and it was a no go. Either buy a complete lathe already set up with the metal cutting attachment or spend just as much for a questionable condition attachment. And I still wouldn't have been able to have a power feed. Oh, and it's headed for the nephew's garage when he gets it built. It was his grandfather's.

    The Craftsman thing was made in, of all places, Ann Arbor decades ago. And I wouldn't subject you to thinking that it's a useful tool. It's in need of a complete refurbishment, assuming that I can find the parts. The only reason why I'm going to do that is because it came from a favorite uncle.

    And the Unimat. Well, if you were to make slot cars, not real cars, it might be useful. I typically set it up as a precision drill press for tiny stuff, like the sampling devices that I designed for DEC.

    Hence, the Atlas bench lathe. You'll thank me for not saddling you with tools that just plain don't cut it. Next time we're on the phone again I'll tell you more.

    Leave a comment:


  • DanStokes
    replied
    Originally posted by dave.g.in.gansevoort View Post
    Oh, and if you look at the welding bench in the background, it's been cleaned off! What a concept!
    I tried that once. Didn't last.

    Why don't you sell me one of your old ones and a bit of tooling? I don't need much but there are times...... (I really hanker for a Bridgeport)

    Leave a comment:


  • dave.g.in.gansevoort
    replied
    Oh, and if you look at the welding bench in the background, it's been cleaned off! What a concept!

    Leave a comment:


  • dave.g.in.gansevoort
    replied
    Credit my nephew for the 3 pictures. I'm still on the mend, taking drugs ( prescription, please... That other kind was 5 decades ago), lazing around the house, trying to get into a position where nothing hurts. And not getting much of anything done. So here's Alex's pictures of the lathe and the stand for it.
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    Here's the lathe. Vintage Atlas, great shape, no wear apparent on the ways. Even the paint looks good. A few chips here and there, but I like that. It's been used, but with care. Gibs are snug, and don't appear to have high or low spots. The back gear engages and doesn't feel sloppy. And the boxes of spare parts and bits and bobs alone were worth the price of admission.
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    Here's where we were by about 2 pm Saturday. The I-beams were just the right length, and straight. A couple of sections of 2x3 box section tubing for spacers got welded between the two. The legs are 2 pieces of 2x4 0.250 box section tubing. The one on the bench was just that little bit shorter than the other one, hence the piece of plate on the end. The bottoms were made from box section tubing also.

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    And here's the semi-finished stand. It's going to have to wait a bit for me to finish the assembly of the thing. Should be up and running in a couple of weeks...

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  • dave.g.in.gansevoort
    replied
    So, my nephew ratrodder on the hamb, brought the new to me lathe over to my garage this past weekend and we spent the day Saturday making a stand for it. Sorry, no pictures yet. Been waylaid by a GD kidney stone. And that little f《#er has me doubled over when I move. They said it will pass. I've had them before so I know the routine. Drink lots of water, take a pill a day (Flowmax??? That's a new one on me). And I'll piss a lot!

    So when the nurse practitioner was going over the instructions and testing results, she casually mentioned that women who have given birth, and had kidney stones have pretty much all said the kidney stones are worse than childbirth for pain.

    Had to tell me that...

    Oh well, I'm already feeling a bit better with the first capsule. If I can stand up straight tomorrow I'll get pictures...

    Leave a comment:


  • dave.g.in.gansevoort
    replied
    Originally posted by Loren View Post
    BTW here's valve covers. Probably small dings. If you use 'em you can have 'em, just PM me an address. -Loren

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    Yes, please sir! May I have another? I'll pm you in a couple of minutes. I'm slow... thanks. They look perfect for the 283...

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  • Loren
    replied
    BTW here's valve covers. Probably small dings. If you use 'em you can have 'em, just PM me an address. -Loren

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  • dave.g.in.gansevoort
    replied
    Started reworking the headers today. Here's 2 pictures of the in progress left side header.
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ID:	1344420 That's the best I can do. The only way to get them perfect would require cutting everything all apart for and shortening some tubes, and lengthening others. In the future, there's going to be tri-Y headers, so that I can fit them under the hood and side panels. That picture taped to the car is the inspiration for them for me. I did fiddle with it a little bit since the left side header was off. And that side is the more difficult side to make. Cylinders 1 and 5 have to merge and 3 and 7 before merging with each other. So a little bit of fettling will be required. The right side is cake in comparison. 2 and 4 merge, and 6 and 8 merge then they merge with each other.

    So moving forward. And preliminary measurements shows that the V8-60 tube axle should fit with appropriate bracketry. It's a tad wider than the custom made tube axle currently in the car. But well within the width of the rear hubs and spacers. And lest you fear about spacers, the qc rear has grand national speedway hubs, full floaters, with 3 inch long studs, AND a center register made for that exact purpose. Used to be, a good way to adjust handling was to change wheel offset. But the wheels were required to have a set backspacing. Hence the use of spacers, which was allowed. And the maximum I'd need on each side looks to be only 3/4-inch. Now the hard part is making the bracketry.

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  • dave.g.in.gansevoort
    replied
    Originally posted by DanStokes View Post

    Did you get the junk out of it? That's a weird thing.
    Yes I did! It looked like a chunk of stuff remaining in the axle from the forging process. The V8-60 axle is unique in that it appears that the axle was formed from tubing (I know, really...). But thru a process of forging steps, it was flattened in its thickness front to back. It was bent into the unique shape. And the ends were forged somehow into the eyes for the kingpins. The ends of the eyes have an opening, which seems to be the end of the tube. And the bosses for the wishbone are not a thru bung but just mitered washerlike things tack welded on the outside of the tube. There's no boss all the way thru.

    So there's a few holes that were either bored or punched thru to make a couple of the holes in the axle. That is what the swarf looked like. And I bet that it drove someone nuts trying to track down a noise in the front suspension of the original car!

    Leave a comment:

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