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The "Whatever" Project

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  • Dave - Sent you an Email

    Dan

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    • Got some quality garage time in today. Made the front panhard bar bracketry and stuff and got it tacked in. Click image for larger version

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ID:	1315604 Most of the time 1 1/2 - 2 hours, was spent on making that upright fit correctly. The upper fishmouth was easy, the lower one, not so much. The 2 brackets were easy in comparison, even tho there's more to them. As can be seen, the axle end has 3 positions, and the frame end is basically put it where it needs to be to be level when the right end is set. So I should be able to dial in how tight the whatever is, as the front bar is higher than the back bar to start. both ends can be adjusted up or down, but right now I will start with a push in the car. its easier to know where you are going... And then steer with the throttle!

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      • Made a crossmember today Click image for larger version

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ID:	1315646 It's the k shaped thing down in there. Also started on the support for the front of the nose. Of course I broke a bandsaw blade. It had been doing one of those hinkey joggles every revolution for a while. While changing it, I got thinking. Which usually is a terrible thing. But this time I happened to think what do the new guys think they need in the way of tools versus what can get the job done. I have a collection of oddball tools, a few so old that some of the cars we work on are newer! So just for fun, I took pictures of the stuff I use.

        Lately I've talked about the small bandsaw I have: Click image for larger version

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ID:	1315647 That's it on the right side of the mini bench. It's a Milwaukee Porta-band saw and SWAG Offroad stand to make it a vertical saw. I can get some pretty good sized brackets cut out with it. I just have to plan each cut and the order of the cuts. It slows me down, which is not a bad thing, as I have more time to think about what I'm doing. It saves time and materials in the long run.

        Beside it is an antique Montgomery Wards Power Craft belt sander, 4x36. I believe it is just post WW2. I had to rebush it and I put that slightly older motor on it, changing it from belt drive to direct drive. It works fine. Behind that is a Ryobi chop saw, approximately 20 years old, with a cast iron base. Good for cutting long stuff to size, but I only use it outside. Makes a big mess and is very noisy. Oh well I have it, it works, so it stays in the garage.

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ID:	1315649 I know, crappy picture. The left one is a 22 year old Craftsman drll press and a 6 inch Craftsman bench grinder mounted on a pedestal made from leftover materials. The left wheel is for tungsten electrodes ONLY! The right picture is a Delta radial drill press. I traded an old Montgomery Wards Sea King outboard motor for it. Best way to get stuff. Got the motor when its owner was going to scrap it. So the only investment in it is the new drive belt and some effort to clean it up. They are good for different jobs.

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ID:	1315651 Lincoln tig/stick weler, 22 years old. Still working great. I'd love one of those fancy inverter jobs with all of the extra features but this one still works. The mig welder is a Millermatic 211, about 5 years old. Same story, does everything I know how to do, so its staying too.

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ID:	1315653 More antique tools. The lathe (if that's what you want to call it) is an old Craftsman teenie, tiny lathe from the late 40s maybe early 50s. It's not too capable, but it's okay for small stuff. I made a lot of spacers for rod ends with it, just slooooowly! The red thing is older than dirt. It's a 1928 vintage Sunnen bushing grinder, great for honing kingpin bosses and bushings. It came out of a garage in my home town. The old mechanic bought it new in 28, used it for years, and when he retired he gave it to a friend who had a Shell station in town. It was bound for the town dump when I rescued it in 75. The tooling has not changed so it will probably be around for another few decades.

        The lathe on the right is a Delta Double Duty lathe. It came out of a textile mill in Massachusetts, owned and operated by my sister-in-law's family for 3 or 4 generations, until textiles in the northeast went away. It went to my brother after his father in law moved into a retirement home a number of years ago. It was just a horizontal surface in my brother's garage, and he gave it to me in 2015. I use it for threading radius rods and other odd round things.

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ID:	1315656 Finally the last few things that are handy to have sometimes. The first is the anvil. It's an old 1880s vintage I think that belongs to the neighbor. But I get to use it. Beating something into submission on one is a good way to relieve stress. The next one is my air system, comprised of 2 small Harbor freight ultra quiet compressors and a 5 or 7 gallon tote tank repurposed to increase the system's volume. It will run my impact guns and the tubing bender without pausing to recharge so more than enough for me. The last item is a 50s era Allen Synchrograph distributor machine. I don't use it much anymore, but I made money with it back in the 70's and early 80's setting up distributors.

        There's more, but who cares? My point is that you don't need a cnc mill, waterjet cutting capability, and all the other high dollar tools we all lust for. Yes its more work or slower, but the money saved is better spent getting parts instead.

        That's my story and I'm sticking to it. And whining about how nice it would be to have all those fancy tools...

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        • That was a very nice tour thank you. Some day I want to build a car from scratch, but I am still a long way off from that.

          My current project to put a turbo on my mustang is teaching me alot. I have learned I need to spend a little more on materials. Also pie cuts are great when needed but take a log time to cut and weld. Next time I plan to buy new bends. A friend let me borrow a horizontal band saw it's great for cutting straight sections but I was unable to use it to cut some of the bends. I was thinking that one of the metal chop saws (loud dirty spark maker) would be an option?

          I am hoping to get the mustang running soon. I ran the exhaust out under the front fender. I converted my goal from getting it right to getting it running. Thinking ahead I am assuming I will not like it. Thinking about what it will take to get it out the back.
          http://www.bangshift.com/forum/forum...-consolidation

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          • You know I'm good with exhaust out the front fender so suit yourself!

            Dan

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            • Originally posted by DanStokes View Post
              You know I'm good with exhaust out the front fender so suit yourself!

              Dan
              It really depends on how loud it is and if I can smell it going down the road. I have dreams about driving it to work at least once a week and I want to do a drag and drive event next year. There is Thursday-Sunday one in South Carolina in May that looks interesting.
              http://www.bangshift.com/forum/forum...-consolidation

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              • Originally posted by Russell View Post

                It really depends on how loud it is and if I can smell it going down the road. I have dreams about driving it to work at least once a week and I want to do a drag and drive event next year. There is Thursday-Sunday one in South Carolina in May that looks interesting.
                I think that you should take the time to run the exhaust to the rear. Driving 5 minutes with the exhaust loud and in your face is one thing. Driving any length of time with it in front of the driver's compartment could be really bad for you. CO poisoning is the problem. NASCAR has issues with that to the point that the helmet air systems have "filters " that scrub the CO from the air supplied to it. These filters are replaced regularly but sometimes you still see a driver having problems.

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                • Originally posted by dave.g.in.gansevoort View Post

                  I think that you should take the time to run the exhaust to the rear. Driving 5 minutes with the exhaust loud and in your face is one thing. Driving any length of time with it in front of the driver's compartment could be really bad for you. CO poisoning is the problem. NASCAR has issues with that to the point that the helmet air systems have "filters " that scrub the CO from the air supplied to it. These filters are replaced regularly but sometimes you still see a driver having problems.
                  Any advice on cutting exhaust pipe in the middle of a bend so it can be butt welded?

                  http://www.bangshift.com/forum/forum...-consolidation

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                  • Originally posted by Russell View Post

                    It really depends on how loud it is and if I can smell it going down the road. I have dreams about driving it to work at least once a week and I want to do a drag and drive event next year. There is Thursday-Sunday one in South Carolina in May that looks interesting.
                    I don't notice much odor in the cab from Mutt and I'm disappointed at how quiet it is but I am only driving a couple of miles at a time. Turbos absorb a lot of noise (at least Mutt's does).

                    Dan

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                    • Originally posted by Russell View Post

                      Any advice on cutting exhaust pipe in the middle of a bend so it can be butt welded?
                      If you mean, getting a neat cut in large diameter tubing that is straight out from the radius center so that it makes a smooth blend with a straight piece, tie a string around it tight where you want the cut to be, then slide/rotate that around a bit to settle in and it will find a good line. Mark w/ a Sharpie alongside the string then have at it w/ tool of choice. BTW I would never place an exhaust outlet where it had any chance of letting anything into the car, just because of a bad experience or two. A little but of fumes but over a long time is killer.

                      I love a shop full of cheap, smart tools. Neat work doesn't care what tool you did it with.
                      Last edited by Loren; March 10, 2022, 03:43 AM.
                      ...

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                      • Nice Edisodian Era Tools converted to AC motors.
                        I wish I had a neighbor who forgot to take his Anvil Home....
                        Here they Sell By The Ounce, even at Auctions !!!
                        And if you watch during the "Inspections" during registration for the auction, Old Timers strike it, not hard, just a strong Tap, too listen for it's Tone, and cracks.

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                        • Originally posted by Loren View Post

                          If you mean, getting a neat cut in large diameter tubing that is straight out from the radius center so that it makes a smooth blend with a straight piece.
                          Yes! That was the question. Your string idea is great. What tool would you use? As someone who can't draw a straight line with out an edge my free had cutting skills are just as bad. The smaller the gap the easier I find it to weld. The better the cut the less grinding required to make a small gap.

                          I am assuming I will want to run it out the back I want to run it up and around the arm so I expect a good number of bends. I didn't keep up with it but I think I had close to 4 hours in one 90 bend at that rate Houston (5 years old) would be able to drive it before I got to the back if I am using 1/2" pie cuts.
                          Last edited by Russell; March 10, 2022, 11:49 AM.
                          http://www.bangshift.com/forum/forum...-consolidation

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                          • Well you CAN buy bends in all sizes and angles so you can reduce the number of pie cuts with judicious ordering. I know you're cheap but you time does have value.

                            Dan

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                            • Another trick is use hose clamps to mark the line, and/or cheat and run your hacksaw/reciprocating saw blade along the clamp. Also take a scrap section of the muffler pipe, wrap a hose clamp around it, and drill 3 evenly spaced holes thru the clamp using a step drill bit. Make the holes big enough to tack weld thru. Now when you start piecing together the exhaust system, use the clamp to hold the 2 ends together, and tack thru the holes. Sorry I don't have a picture of this, but you get the idea.

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                              • Originally posted by Captain View Post
                                Nice Edisodian Era Tools converted to AC motors.
                                I wish I had a neighbor who forgot to take his Anvil Home....
                                Here they Sell By The Ounce, even at Auctions !!!
                                And if you watch during the "Inspections" during registration for the auction, Old Timers strike it, not hard, just a strong Tap, too listen for it's Tone, and cracks.
                                I am into Steampunk. I bet you couldn't tell from the tools...

                                Regarding the anvil, it had a broken leg. It's wrought iron which is actually hot forged mild steel from a metallurgy point of view. I built up a new leg from hot rolled mild steel and welded it back together with high nickel rod, with some preheat. Came out great. And it rings like a bell. The base is 6 sections of 4x4 pressure treated lumber out of the neighbor's wood pile, screwed together with 12 inch long construction lags, the modern kind.

                                I then made 2 hold down clamps to keep it from moving around. The neighbor and I have plans to build a 2 sided shed-ish kind of shed(?) to then build a forge in. It's going to be behind my shed under, are you ready for this?...










                                A chestnut tree. Well 3 or 4 actually. Coincidence? I'm not much of a poetry fan, but that is one of my favorites.

                                And we'll also be setting up a wood shop in his big out building. I have an older Craftsman table saw, cast iron top, 8 inch blade, set up for a 6 inch dado blade. And a warm garage to bring his other old machinery over for rebuilds.

                                I wasn't always edumacated as an enginurd. I started adult life becoming a millwright building paper machinery, so a simple planer or jointer is childs play to get running again. Our long term plan is to be able to make stuff from the junk, er, that is the valuable materials we collect and see if we can sell things. Well that's the plan...

                                Sorry for hijacking the thread, I'll stop now

                                Wait a minute this is my thread! But no more
                                Last edited by dave.g.in.gansevoort; March 10, 2022, 02:31 PM.

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