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The "Whatever" Project

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  • DanStokes
    replied
    Originally posted by dave.g.in.gansevoort View Post

    With age comes wisdom and patience. 2 commodities for wood working that I am sorely lacking! I have made a few things, just to be able to say that I can. But it was a lot of frustrating steps that just cannot be hurried. And like Captain said, I don't got no wood welder! Or board stretcher.
    Just like metal only you use glue and sometimes biscuits.

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  • dave.g.in.gansevoort
    replied
    Originally posted by DanStokes View Post
    I do a little wood work in addition to the stuff you guys see on here. I enjoy it all. Here's a plant bench I made for ME. I also made our dining room table and a game table for ME's studio - and a bunch of other odds and ends.

    Click image for larger version Name:	IMG_2182.jpg Views:	0 Size:	918.8 KB ID:	1351506
    With age comes wisdom and patience. 2 commodities for wood working that I am sorely lacking! I have made a few things, just to be able to say that I can. But it was a lot of frustrating steps that just cannot be hurried. And like Captain said, I don't got no wood welder! Or board stretcher.

    Leave a comment:


  • DanStokes
    replied
    I do a little wood work in addition to the stuff you guys see on here. I enjoy it all. Here's a plant bench I made for ME. I also made our dining room table and a game table for ME's studio - and a bunch of other odds and ends.

    Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_2182.jpg Views:	0 Size:	918.8 KB ID:	1351506
    Last edited by DanStokes; March 23, 2024, 09:02 AM.

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  • Captain
    replied
    Only if they made a "Welder" for wood,
    I could maybe then make something more than Wheel Chocks!!

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  • dave.g.in.gansevoort
    replied
    Well, I think that all of you have conjured up an image of how my mind works (or whatever you want to call it), and of course Dan knows from being exposed to the vagaries of the workings and also partially responsible for some of the odd musings. This leads me to the following: about a half hour ago, I was brushing my teeth and glanced at the mirror while the foam from the effort was frothing from my mouth. It reminded me of the comment Dan made about gluing and screwing the 2x6 base together for the English Wheel.

    And I got to chuckling to myself over an image that popped into my head if I had done that. Can you all remember kindergarten, when you got to use the white paste glue? And the mess you made with it? Yeah, that would be me even today working with wood glue. So, no, it's not glued and screwed. It's just bolted together with a bunch of carriage bolts. Safer that way. No mess that way, and plenty strong enough...

    Remember, I am not a woodworker. Wood trembles whenever I pick up a saw. It knows that it won't end well...

    That's my story and I'm sticking to it!

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  • dave.g.in.gansevoort
    replied
    Originally posted by DanStokes View Post
    World Wide Auto Parts of Madison www.nosimport.com
    Thanks Dan. Those prices, even without a core, are below reasonable. I'm going to make an effort to get them to fit, and maybe later this year, off they go. And I am going to inquire about the possibility of converting to adjustable damping. I've seen it scanning the internet for Armstrong lever shocks info. It certainly could be done given a lathe and a few of the valving mechanisms to modify. But if the bits and bobs are already available, then it's just a matter of money...

    And I got nothing real done today, because I had to move stuff around to be able to get the daily driver into the garage. We're likely to get Snowmageddon tonight! Well, at least the doomsayers meteorological people are. Prognostications are anywhere from a couple of inches to upwards of a foot of snow. But I left the snowblower in the garage just in case, so it will turn out to be a big nothingburger. But as we all know,

    A failure to plan, is a plan for failure . And we both remember that happening back in the A-squared days.

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  • DanStokes
    replied
    World Wide Auto Parts of Madison www.nosimport.com

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  • DanStokes
    replied
    Originally posted by dave.g.in.gansevoort View Post

    Thanks. Yes, I figured they'd get a rebuild eventually. And I have to check total travel yet. The axle currently can move 5 inches give or take a half inch. So if the end of the arms can travel that distance as is, phat city. If not, then I will consider lengthening the arms to get the travel. The down side of that is the effective damping is lowered, i.e. softer feeling shocks. But that can be compensated for at rebuild time, either by heavier oil viscosity, or changing the "jets " inside of the shocks. Orifices is a better way to say it. Or maybe both. Time will tell...
    Yes, they can make them stiffer - IIRC there are options to install stiffer springs that, I think, a check ball acts against. Anyhow, they can do some magic as needed. That said I'm pretty sure the arms do move 5" or more.

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  • dave.g.in.gansevoort
    replied
    Originally posted by DanStokes View Post

    Shocking! Those ones have a bit of shock power left but I'd get them rebuilt if you decide to go that way. Note that on the MGB they were mounted with the levers up but I have no clue if they'll work at any other angle - research or maybe experimentation. The rebuilders in WI might know - I'll get you their contact info once I dig it up.
    Thanks. Yes, I figured they'd get a rebuild eventually. And I have to check total travel yet. The axle currently can move 5 inches give or take a half inch. So if the end of the arms can travel that distance as is, phat city. If not, then I will consider lengthening the arms to get the travel. The down side of that is the effective damping is lowered, i.e. softer feeling shocks. But that can be compensated for at rebuild time, either by heavier oil viscosity, or changing the "jets " inside of the shocks. Orifices is a better way to say it. Or maybe both. Time will tell...

    Leave a comment:


  • DanStokes
    replied
    Originally posted by dave.g.in.gansevoort View Post

    Woo hoo! I got shocking news! I got a pair of lever shocks today! Thanks Dan!
    Shocking! Those ones have a bit of shock power left but I'd get them rebuilt if you decide to go that way. Note that on the MGB they were mounted with the levers up but I have no clue if they'll work at any other angle - research or maybe experimentation. The rebuilders in WI might know - I'll get you their contact info once I dig it up.

    Leave a comment:


  • dave.g.in.gansevoort
    replied
    Originally posted by DanStokes View Post

    I'll get them to you ASAP. Allergies are currently kicking my butt and I can't get far from a Kleenex box.
    Woo hoo! I got shocking news! I got a pair of lever shocks today! Thanks Dan!

    And I got the new no-phlat wheels and tires on the rolling workbench today. You guys should see the garage. What a mess! But there's light at the end of the tunnel. I just hope that it's not the front of a locomotive. The parts that are already reorganized look like it should work. I've got a ways to go tho, before I get back to the Whatever project. Next is to redo the tig welder cart. It needs to be a little bit shorter, so 2 casters under the front, no-phlat tires on the rear, and cut the current front axle assembly off. Sounds easy, but probably not!

    And I plan to recycle some of the old phlat tires from the rolling workbench as the isolation/riser pads Dan suggested for the English Wheel. I think my Fein oscillating tool will cut them up just fine! A couple of screws, and viola, we got risers/anti-skid/vibration isolation pads. Not that the 3rd objective is much of a concern.

    So until tomorrow, keep your friends close. And your enemies closer!

    Leave a comment:


  • dave.g.in.gansevoort
    replied
    Originally posted by Captain View Post
    My Name is Captain......
    And I am a Rusty Iron Junkie......
    I have 6+ projects going.....
    I can't find the bottom of my Work Bench....
    And I JUST BOUGHT Another 10 mm Wrench and Socket.....
    Hi, Captain. I too am a rusty iron junkie! I, I, I guess it's been a long time coming, but admitting that makes me feel a whole lot better. And isn't that the first step, admitting to the rust? Well, unless I'm working with aluminum. Oh, and there's stainless steel. And bronze, brass, copper, plastics, fiberglass, wood... well not so much at 70.

    Like Benson said, "I'm not as good as I once was, but I'm as good once as I always was!"

    But that'sa different story.

    Leave a comment:


  • Captain
    replied
    My Name is Captain......
    And I am a Rusty Iron Junkie......
    I have 6+ projects going.....
    I can't find the bottom of my Work Bench....
    And I JUST BOUGHT Another 10 mm Wrench and Socket.....

    Leave a comment:


  • dave.g.in.gansevoort
    replied
    Okay, so now I can move on to the next task on the list, leading to being able to get back to the Whatever project! The compound gear came in today. Went right on. And the chance gears to set the speed of the lead screw, while not the easiest way to set the speed, is functional. Now I know why quick change speed and feed assemblies were invented! So I can start making scrap. Well, I could if there wasn't a few other things to get out of the way.

    Like getting the new wheels and tires on the rolling workbench, and redoing the carriage under the tig welder, and getting the Sunnen honing machine out of the corner and running, and cleaning off the tops of all of the work benches, and finding a semi-permanent home for the English Wheel and the tubing bender and anvil, and...

    Yup, just like how to eat an elephant. One bite at a time...

    Leave a comment:


  • dave.g.in.gansevoort
    replied
    Originally posted by DanStokes View Post
    So you made a mortise and tenon! Lots of glue? And the plywood feet - paint them on all sides and edges. Otherwise if they get wet at all they'll delaminate which is annoying. I know how you love paint......
    Yeah, I guess. But it only required a circular saw and a drill. No fancy woodworking tools were destroyed in the creation of the T. So even though my garage is kept dry, you're recommending paint or something to seal the plywood? Well, I guess I'll have to put Alex on the paint next time he's here for garage therapy.

    Or, I could get some really thick rubber isolation material. That would serve 2 purposes: keep moisture away from the wood parts, and isolate the frame from vibrations. And it would be better for keeping the tool from skidding around during use.

    Thanks Dan for that suggestion. I'll get some rubber isolation material and use it instead of the plywood that I was considering.

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