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The "Whatever" Project

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  • dave.g.in.gansevoort
    replied
    Originally posted by DanStokes View Post

    I'll get them to you ASAP. Allergies are currently kicking my butt and I can't get far from a Kleenex box.
    Woo hoo! I got shocking news! I got a pair of lever shocks today! Thanks Dan!

    And I got the new no-phlat wheels and tires on the rolling workbench today. You guys should see the garage. What a mess! But there's light at the end of the tunnel. I just hope that it's not the front of a locomotive. The parts that are already reorganized look like it should work. I've got a ways to go tho, before I get back to the Whatever project. Next is to redo the tig welder cart. It needs to be a little bit shorter, so 2 casters under the front, no-phlat tires on the rear, and cut the current front axle assembly off. Sounds easy, but probably not!

    And I plan to recycle some of the old phlat tires from the rolling workbench as the isolation/riser pads Dan suggested for the English Wheel. I think my Fein oscillating tool will cut them up just fine! A couple of screws, and viola, we got risers/anti-skid/vibration isolation pads. Not that the 3rd objective is much of a concern.

    So until tomorrow, keep your friends close. And your enemies closer!

    Leave a comment:


  • dave.g.in.gansevoort
    replied
    Originally posted by Captain View Post
    My Name is Captain......
    And I am a Rusty Iron Junkie......
    I have 6+ projects going.....
    I can't find the bottom of my Work Bench....
    And I JUST BOUGHT Another 10 mm Wrench and Socket.....
    Hi, Captain. I too am a rusty iron junkie! I, I, I guess it's been a long time coming, but admitting that makes me feel a whole lot better. And isn't that the first step, admitting to the rust? Well, unless I'm working with aluminum. Oh, and there's stainless steel. And bronze, brass, copper, plastics, fiberglass, wood... well not so much at 70.

    Like Benson said, "I'm not as good as I once was, but I'm as good once as I always was!"

    But that'sa different story.

    Leave a comment:


  • Captain
    replied
    My Name is Captain......
    And I am a Rusty Iron Junkie......
    I have 6+ projects going.....
    I can't find the bottom of my Work Bench....
    And I JUST BOUGHT Another 10 mm Wrench and Socket.....

    Leave a comment:


  • dave.g.in.gansevoort
    replied
    Okay, so now I can move on to the next task on the list, leading to being able to get back to the Whatever project! The compound gear came in today. Went right on. And the chance gears to set the speed of the lead screw, while not the easiest way to set the speed, is functional. Now I know why quick change speed and feed assemblies were invented! So I can start making scrap. Well, I could if there wasn't a few other things to get out of the way.

    Like getting the new wheels and tires on the rolling workbench, and redoing the carriage under the tig welder, and getting the Sunnen honing machine out of the corner and running, and cleaning off the tops of all of the work benches, and finding a semi-permanent home for the English Wheel and the tubing bender and anvil, and...

    Yup, just like how to eat an elephant. One bite at a time...

    Leave a comment:


  • dave.g.in.gansevoort
    replied
    Originally posted by DanStokes View Post
    So you made a mortise and tenon! Lots of glue? And the plywood feet - paint them on all sides and edges. Otherwise if they get wet at all they'll delaminate which is annoying. I know how you love paint......
    Yeah, I guess. But it only required a circular saw and a drill. No fancy woodworking tools were destroyed in the creation of the T. So even though my garage is kept dry, you're recommending paint or something to seal the plywood? Well, I guess I'll have to put Alex on the paint next time he's here for garage therapy.

    Or, I could get some really thick rubber isolation material. That would serve 2 purposes: keep moisture away from the wood parts, and isolate the frame from vibrations. And it would be better for keeping the tool from skidding around during use.

    Thanks Dan for that suggestion. I'll get some rubber isolation material and use it instead of the plywood that I was considering.

    Leave a comment:


  • DanStokes
    replied
    So you made a mortise and tenon! Lots of glue? And the plywood feet - paint them on all sides and edges. Otherwise if they get wet at all they'll delaminate which is annoying. I know how you love paint......

    Leave a comment:


  • dave.g.in.gansevoort
    replied
    Today's results of the Great Garage DisGorgement! Or how to stuff 10 pounds in a 5 pound bag.

    I feel like I'm playing a 3D Tetris game and the piecesof the game don't match. Every move causes the next piece of the puzzle to drop, but now it's gone from squares hooked together to spheroidal shaped objects. And the next move will bring triangular and pyramidal shapes into play.

    I made a base for the English Wheel I got from Jeg's. I've been watching videos on the internet on English Wheels, in particular wray Shelin's videos. His classes are taught using wheels that he got from harbor freight, which is an identical twin to those sold by Jeg's, with one exception, Jeg's include 6 lower wheels. When I started thinkingabout getting one, I had gotten a text message from Jeg's with a sale price. Not bad, but I was still on the fence regarding getting it.

    And I kept getting messages from Jeg's, each time as a teaser, they kept lowering the price a little bit. And when it eventually got close to the price harbor freight was listing for the wheel minus the lower anvils, about 15 bucks, I pulled the trigger, figuratively speaking. And when I assembled it, I assembled it in the fashion that Shelin's machines are all assembled, with the single leg under the working end for a little less interference with your feet.

    And I liked the idea of a wooden framework that stabilizes it and raises it up. However 2 things: being thrifty I didn't want to buy 6x6 beams, and not being very fond of woodworking, I didn't want to make either a lap joint or mortise and tenon joint to make a T-shape base. So I bought 2 12 foot 2x6s and made what can be seen in the pictures:
    Click image for larger version

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    I need to get 3 pieces of 3/4 plywood, 5.5x5.5 inches square for each end to lift it just a scosh more and stabilize it from any little rockyness. I'll then figure out how to position it somewhere in the Tetris game called Dave's Garage!

    Leave a comment:


  • dave.g.in.gansevoort
    replied
    Originally posted by DanStokes View Post

    I'll get them to you ASAP. Allergies are currently kicking my butt and I can't get far from a Kleenex box.
    No hurry! I'm currently rearranging the garage to make a hole for the Atlas lathe. It's amazing how much crap can collect over time. Just under the other lathe, the Delta Double Duty wood/light metal lathe, there was a pile of metal chips, scrap nuts and bolts (yes, I throw some stuff out), and some parts from 2 other lathes that I acquired when I was given a pile of old automotive machine shop machines. By the way, I have some spare valve grinding gear, both seats and valves, that could use another home. I'm looking for usable 1957-1958 Chevy powerpack heads with the staggered valve cover bolt holes, just in case someone wants valve grinding gear, has a pair of those heads, and wants to make a straight across trade. only caveat, you're gonna hafta come here with a truck to pick up the vave grinder, it's heavy, and it's not my brother...

    Just a thought. Anyway, back to the subject at hand. So I moved the Delta out into the center of the garage, but first I moved some heavy cast iron, then some other stuff, finally swept up and now at least I can see the home for the Atlas. But the bad news, I've got 3 benches now covered with other stuff needing permanent homes. Like 2 sets of wheels, 1 set for the rolling bench, the other set for the tig welder. And no tire is pneumatic. Solid rubber. No more flats!

    And the final required gear is on order to get the Atlas running! 16/32 compound gear, or tumbler gear, I've seen it called both. Every other gear, some in duplicate, ready and waiting to be bolted on! Then Ican make some threaded bungs for suspension components and get the steering finalized! I'm still ruminating over the exhaust system, I may have to get 2 more pipe bends in 2.5 od. And then there's anothr crown on one of my molars...

    But that's another story

    Leave a comment:


  • DanStokes
    replied
    Originally posted by dave.g.in.gansevoort View Post
    Still a bit computer illiterate... doubled the picture somehow! Here's the bar sort of mocked up on the Whatever project

    Click image for larger version

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ID:	1351103 This was a while back, but it is about the same way I'm thinking will work. I've got to make just a tiny bit more room to squeeze it in there, but the way I've got things moved around right now I think that everything will clear. And maybe with some lever shocks it'll look a little more traditional.
    I'll get them to you ASAP. Allergies are currently kicking my butt and I can't get far from a Kleenex box.

    Leave a comment:


  • dave.g.in.gansevoort
    replied
    Still a bit computer illiterate... doubled the picture somehow! Here's the bar sort of mocked up on the Whatever project

    Click image for larger version

Name:	20240312_181428.jpg
Views:	100
Size:	641.1 KB
ID:	1351103 This was a while back, but it is about the same way I'm thinking will work. I've got to make just a tiny bit more room to squeeze it in there, but the way I've got things moved around right now I think that everything will clear. And maybe with some lever shocks it'll look a little more traditional.

    Leave a comment:


  • dave.g.in.gansevoort
    replied
    Originally posted by Captain View Post
    Just trying to Visualize using Trailer Load Bars as a "Torsion Barr" front end suspension......
    You are giving me Nightmares of How Cheap my Dad WAS over the Years.....
    I'm still trying to keep him from Messing with his 2025 Honda HRV.... I'm afraid he has Already Voided any warranty left with LESS than 1,200 miles on it..
    Well, you see, it's like this: both Jim's 54 coupe and my 54 coach race cars used them on the front suspension. And the coach had them on the rear suspension as well.
    Click image for larger version

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ID:	1351101 Here's the front on the coach way back in 75. It's just a cantilevered spring, pivoted at the rear, with 2 places for jacking bolts, and the frontjust rested on the top of the axle. So with 3 different bar spring rates, and 2 different jacking points, we had 6 different effective spring rates at the axle. Those bars were about $10/each back then, cheaper for used. I had 2 of each, 500, 750, and 1000 pound rate bars. 3 were new, 3 were used. Under $50 for all of the springs. A single coilover spring was already $40-$50 each depending on rate and length.

    The only thing difficult was drilling the fixed end for the pivot bolts. Reese uses a forged fitting that rigidly holds the bar, and the bar is retained from sliding out by a 3/16-inch roll pin, as it sees no force in its intended use. For use as a spring that hole has to be drilled out to 3/8 or 7/16. Which takes a solid carbide drill bit! They are hardened steel after all. I never had a 3/8 grade 8 bolt fail in one, so that is what I drilled to.
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • Captain
    replied
    Just trying to Visualize using Trailer Load Bars as a "Torsion Barr" front end suspension......
    You are giving me Nightmares of How Cheap my Dad WAS over the Years.....
    I'm still trying to keep him from Messing with his 2025 Honda HRV.... I'm afraid he has Already Voided any warranty left with LESS than 1,200 miles on it..

    Leave a comment:


  • dave.g.in.gansevoort
    replied
    So, do we consider getting lumber for a base for the English Wheel work on the Whatever project? How about getting a change gear banjo and some of the bits and bobs required to get the lathe up and running? Well, I got lumber and the gear stuff today. The neighbor is going to help with building the base for the English Wheel. Meanwhile, the lathe parts, being used, were grungy, but otherwise in good condition. So I took the parts, a small portable workbench, brake cleaner, and my oil drain pan outside in the driveway and set to work getting the worst of the grunge off. And even though it was cold and breezy, that worked out rather nicely, as it was blowing the smell of the brake cleaner away from me and the garage. Next, I'll finish washing the parts in the mudroom sink with Palmolive and hot water. Next time in the garage, I'll be able to assemble the gear train, and get it fully operational. Woo hoo!

    And I have been reconsidering the front suspension. I think I can wriggle room for a pair of Reese load leveling bars for springs. The driver's side fits no problem, the passenger side needs just a little bit more room. But I think it's doable. We'll see...

    Leave a comment:


  • dave.g.in.gansevoort
    replied
    Finally got a start on cleaning up the garage between yesterday and today. I got my Craftsman Dunlap little lathe de-chipped and partially disassembled and all of the parts are in the basement now. I'm going to rehab it and get it back to decent operating condition. I have it mounted on an old Singer treadle sewing machine base that the neighbors gave me. The treadle still works, and I have some bits and bobs that I could use to make the treadle power the lathe. And I'm just crazy enough to give it a try...

    And I cleaned off the Delta Double Duty wood and metal lathe, getting ready to move it so that the Atlas lathe can go in that spot. What I'm going to do with the Delta until my nephew's new abode is finished later this year is a good question. Probably put it along the house side of the gara, where it'll be out of the way but still usable if I need it.

    Bought 4, 13 inch diameter non flat tires and wheels for my hd rolling workbench/tool box. It's going to be a little while before I can change the wheels, as I have to empty it out/off before I can even move it. And that's going to require moving the Whatever project first. It's like a full size 3D Tetris game, only the parts don't exactly fit each other, and they are heavy.

    And I keep finding parts for the Whatever project that I had been looking for. Amazing how that is. Stuff gets stacked on other stuff. Then more stuff is put in front of the stacked stuff. And of course then even more stuff gets stacked on the top of that stuff. I feel like I'm shoveling.... against the tide. I've definitely gone beyond a blivet. There's more than 10 pounds of.... in this 5 pound bag.

    Well, at least I'm moving ahead, if slowly. I'm thinking April will see a return to progress on the Whatever project.

    Leave a comment:


  • dave.g.in.gansevoort
    replied
    And I already have started to design stuff for the Whatever project that requires those capabilities... you just never know.

    Mongo is okay with the development. Sometimes stepping in stuff turns out okay

    Leave a comment:

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