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The Studebaker Wagon Saga....follow it here

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  • squirrel
    replied
    Re: The Studebaker Wagon Saga....follow it here

    yeah, that's .020" under, made June 1963. fun, eh?

    are the rods and mains both 20 under?

    Leave a comment:


  • Brian Lohnes
    replied
    Re: The Studebaker Wagon Saga....follow it here

    The stude racer is Ted Harbit, he has run studes with success since the 1960's...even winning class at the US Nationals several times. He has a turbo setup on the Chicken Hawk now. I've e-mailed with him already.
    Ya didn't think I'd miss that guy did ya?! HA!

    Jim, the bearings read: 020 6 63

    So June 1963 production date pretty much guarantees this thing was apart somewhere in the mid-1960's by my math.

    Is the 020 a sizing deal? We're going to be measuring stuff this weekend so I need to source stock specs. I'll harrass the stude club guys for that info.

    Brian

    Leave a comment:


  • CTX-SLPR
    replied
    Re: The Studebaker Wagon Saga....follow it here

    I believe the R-2's were also supercharged aswell.
    The bolt doesn't look to hold the rod shut like it does on Buick Straigh 8 or Stovebolt 6 rods so It looks to be anti pin rotation more than anything else. For the lifters I'd soak them in ATF or marvel then get out the torch, C-clamp, and some sort of spacer to put compression on the lifters while you heat them and maybe they'll start to budge.
    If that crank is really forged, I'd seriously look into putting big journal SBC stuff in it to open up piston sellection and gaurentee to get the knick out of the journal. Probably best to match the stroke to a rod and piston combo with the deck height.

    Leave a comment:


  • DanStokes
    replied
    Re: The Studebaker Wagon Saga....follow it here

    Tiresmoke -
    Yeah, it was bullet nose, and the guy was ancient (read, older than I am, which is saying something!). Can't pull up a name, though. Joe Roberts might know.

    Dan

    Leave a comment:


  • tiresmoke!
    replied
    Re: The Studebaker Wagon Saga....follow it here

    Sorry for the pseudo-threadjack, but who the hell is the cat mentioned a few years ago in HOT ROD that raced an old Studebaker, with an all-Stude drivetrain(or at least the engine was)?

    That cat may be the one to get ahold of, Brian......would be WAY cool to see that wagon keep the driveline purity(at least the engine, anyway.....trans and third member are kinda meh)

    Leave a comment:


  • Brian Lohnes
    replied
    Re: The Studebaker Wagon Saga....follow it here

    No worries Steve, although I was hoping to find a pet fish for Tom in there.

    Brian

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  • Monster
    replied
    Re: The Studebaker Wagon Saga....follow it here

    WOW !!

    Go away for a few days and I've got three pages to catch up on. Nice pics Brian, but so sorry for the lots of water and no oil thing. That pretty much sucks !

    Keep us posted ...

    Leave a comment:


  • HoosierGTA
    replied
    Re: The Studebaker Wagon Saga....follow it here

    Brian- nah I shot you the pm after I posted just to make sure you saw it a.s.a.p

    Leave a comment:


  • Brian Lohnes
    replied
    Re: The Studebaker Wagon Saga....follow it here

    Hoosier...thanks for the info. I think you shot me a PM on this as well, but I'm a deadbeat and didn't get back to you.
    Thanks for lookin' out.

    Jay -- I've soaked a couple with PB Blaster overnight so we'll see if I can loosen one up and get a verdict on the role of the mystery bolt.

    Brian

    Leave a comment:


  • jays67
    replied
    Re: The Studebaker Wagon Saga....follow it here

    our 26 chevy had the pistons held on the rods like that don't know bout the stude but ours were just the bolt as a pinch bolt and a smoth pin
    way cool to see this car come apart and be reborn

    Leave a comment:


  • HoosierGTA
    replied
    Re: The Studebaker Wagon Saga....follow it here

    Originally posted by Brian Lohnes


    I'm working on trying to find some of the factory Hi-po stuff, which would be cool to use in this motor. Stude had R-1, R-2, and R-3 factory high performance motors (The R-3's were the blower motors) and those parts are out there as well.



    Brian
    Brian ,there's a new guy here on the forum that I work with that he and his dad are into studes in a big way. He can tell you where to get a new stude engine still in the crate .I was talking to him at work today and I told him to post something on the tread but you might PM him if he doesn't. He's 47STUDE

    Leave a comment:


  • squirrel
    replied
    Re: The Studebaker Wagon Saga....follow it here

    Generally if the pistons are knurled they're stock size. And oversize pistons almost always have something like 030 stamped into the top, it's hard to miss! aside from that, I can measure to the nearest 1/100 of an inch with a tape measure or steel rule....give it a try...but it's also likely that the block had the ridge reamed out when it was overhauled, so the tops of the bores are probably bigger than the bottoms (unless as mentioned it got a rigid hone job of several thousandths oversize)

    If you have access to a bore gage, set it to a mic that is set to the standard bore size (set the bore gage to zero at the standard bore diameter), then it will read the oversize directly in thousandths.

    Leave a comment:


  • Brian Lohnes
    replied
    Re: The Studebaker Wagon Saga....follow it here

    Replacement Pistons will probably not be a problem although it seems that I am going to have to bore this sucker so I'm hoping I can get some oversized jobbers from a place like egge. If not it looks like I'll be calling a piston company and talking turkey.

    The connecting rods, being forged steel units (along with the crank too) are not a strength concern for me, but I need to make sure they are still true on both ends.

    The good news is that my father in law is the most anal bastard the world has ever known (you know those high level engineer types...he he) and recently built a 440 for his Plymouth. He bought and entire set of very nice gauges, calipers, and other measuring instruments that I'll be able to use to check the block, bores, etc. Replacement rods are available readily as well.

    I'm working on trying to find some of the factory Hi-po stuff, which would be cool to use in this motor. Stude had R-1, R-2, and R-3 factory high performance motors (The R-3's were the blower motors) and those parts are out there as well.

    I was hoping to find some stamps telling me if the thing had been bored out or not already. There is MAJOR ridges on several of the bores so I'm hoping it's not been hogged already because I am going to have to do that I believe.

    Brian

    Leave a comment:


  • squirrel
    replied
    Re: The Studebaker Wagon Saga....follow it here

    Hard to say on the nick without seeing it in person. Even if it does not go away completely with a .010" grind it still should not hurt anything...after all, there is an oil film between the crank and bearings.

    Someone probalby drained the oil in anticipation of working on it, but never got around to it (for 30 years or however long it sat)

    Be very careful with the piston removal, if they are rusted in place then the corrosion has expanded the piston and if you beat on them hard with a bfh it'll probably crack the bores. btdt

    If I were you I'd be putting out feelers for another engine to build...maybe a slightly newer Stude engine?

    Leave a comment:


  • Brian Lohnes
    replied
    Re: The Studebaker Wagon Saga....follow it here

    When I put Tom to bed tonight I'll check the codes on the bearings and see what's what.

    The bearings show some wear, but do not look too bad at all. Getting the camshaft out and the lifters is going to be interesting because both are seized VERY tightly into their respective bearings/bores.

    Speaking of history's mysteries Jim, here's a question for you. Why do you suppose that there is not a drop of oil in this motor? There was some coating the bearings and the crank, but nothing in the pan, a tiny little puddle in the lifter valley and that's about it. Maybe someone drained the oil out of it and was getting ready to do something with the car? About 2 gallons of water but NO oil at all. The crank is not toasted, although it does have that pretty good nick in it...think that can be turned out Jim? (it's in the photos)

    Brian

    Leave a comment:

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