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FJ40 I call Shipwreck

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  • SuperBuickGuy
    replied
    Sooo....
    right now the transfer case has a low gear of 2.62:1. Let me present 4:1

    and very stout


    of course, the 'coming soon' is pulling the t-case and pulling it completely apart, then doing a bit of machining then put it all back together (hopefully not unintentionally lightened)

    and the welder...

    I better get to work

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  • SuperBuickGuy
    replied
    the pricks at pirate said, when I built this rig, that I'd hate driving it without hydro assist. They were wrong, it would fly at 75/80 mph down the freeway and drive straight and true. Now? 60 seems like the limit. I'm going to try some alignment tricks to see if I can make it track true again - but right now, it's a wandering beast. Basically the hydro assist is acting like a powered stabilizer and you have to constantly fine-correct the steering. On smooth ground - it's not even that good there but on rutted roads.... uff da.

    Honestly, I'm considering removing it then installing it at trailheads ... that or trailering (which I loathe the thought).

    With that said, I'm not sorry I put it on there - it does help, especially when crossed up, get my full range of turning back.

    So what's next. Install the welder. But at the same time I'll put a bit more caster at the wheels and try a bit of toe-out. Right now, it's neutral and IIRC 3* ....

    The other choice would be move the sway bar to the front (which will be a challenge), then remove the rear sway bar. The problem with that is it would screw with the IC traction I get from its design. A reminder, when I nail the throttle, the triangulated 4 links lift right about at the point where the input shaft meets the flywheel. By having the rear sway bar, it plants both wheels and up I climb. The front does some pulling but mostly it's doing the steering.... ah the fun of making a rig that is safe to drive at highway speeds and good on the trails.....

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  • SuperBuickGuy
    replied
    Originally posted by Captain View Post
    4 of the 5 voices in my head agree !!

    I don't listen to that 5th voice....he shows up when I'm drinking and wants me to Take A Fat Chick Home....
    That's good, though in my head only 3 of 5 need to agree.... well, unless that last voice pipes in.

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  • Captain
    replied
    4 of the 5 voices in my head agree !!

    I don't listen to that 5th voice....he shows up when I'm drinking and wants me to Take A Fat Chick Home....

    Leave a comment:


  • SuperBuickGuy
    replied
    for those who don't believe I have ADD. I have 4 projects going simultaneously.... perfect. I don't suffer from ADD, I enjoy every minute of it.
    this is a tease for what's coming with the welder - it's solved my voltage spike concern

    Leave a comment:


  • SuperBuickGuy
    replied
    and it's done. Now I have the capability of at least linked battery welding... and a solution is coming for the surge problem

    also straightened the grill


    The solution is a surge protector they make so that you can weld on a rig without disconnecting the battery.... welder soon

    Leave a comment:


  • SuperBuickGuy
    replied
    got the batteries mostly wired... see that terminal connector on the left?

    it disappeared.... spent an hour looking for it.

    ah well, it'll be done tomorrow.

    and that means I can now weld with my '40. Still putting the engine powered version on it, but with 2 batteries, I can weld

    Leave a comment:


  • SuperBuickGuy
    replied
    Originally posted by cstmwgn View Post
    Thank you! If I am comprehending this issue is mostly about the alternator / welder upgrade you have been working on and can't be equally applied to the automotive world at large. I have a 250 amp fuse between my alternator (3G upgrade to 200 amps) and power junction and another 250 amp fuse back at the battery. Things work but I keep trying to understand why Holley (et al) and Vintage Air are both so adamant about "clean power".
    and here is also why the OEMs are far better. I know, I'll have all the aftermarket fighting me, but the OEMs have an algorithm that works to 9v.... don't try that with any aftermarket systems. With that said, the aftermarket systems shine at handling things outside the 'norm' ....

    Leave a comment:


  • SuperBuickGuy
    replied
    Originally posted by cstmwgn View Post
    Thank you! If I am comprehending this issue is mostly about the alternator / welder upgrade you have been working on and can't be equally applied to the automotive world at large. I have a 250 amp fuse between my alternator (3G upgrade to 200 amps) and power junction and another 250 amp fuse back at the battery. Things work but I keep trying to understand why Holley (et al) and Vintage Air are both so adamant about "clean power".
    they're concerned with stable power. At the battery, it is the most stable. A thing about Holley - it is utterly reliant on 2 different voltages. First, you must make more then 13.5 volts at the alternator, and 2) you need 12v minimum for the system to work. It uses those voltages to understand what it's reading from the various sensors, not just that but the injector pulse width is dependent on that as well. If you don't have 12v, say you have 11, your injection cycle will be down whatever percentage that is (.08?) which will lead to a myriad of problems that don't seem in any way related.
    They're also concerned about the electronic noise the alternator can generate.

    Leave a comment:


  • cstmwgn
    replied
    Thank you! If I am comprehending this issue is mostly about the alternator / welder upgrade you have been working on and can't be equally applied to the automotive world at large. I have a 250 amp fuse between my alternator (3G upgrade to 200 amps) and power junction and another 250 amp fuse back at the battery. Things work but I keep trying to understand why Holley (et al) and Vintage Air are both so adamant about "clean power".

    Leave a comment:


  • SuperBuickGuy
    replied
    Originally posted by cstmwgn View Post

    I'm trying to understand (not challenging) - it seems to me that most of the aftermarket companies that sell things with circuit boards/computers want clean power. So how does the battery smooth out power surges when the wire from the alternator attaches to the + terminal at the battery while at the same time (often the same connector) the power wire for the EFI or A/C or whatever connects there as well? What keeps the surge from going back out the wire to the other components?

    Please help me understand if I have wasted a bunch of time and money bring 1/0 welding wire forward from the battery to a junction area to power everything!
    Let's start with I utterly loathe electrical anything.

    I've avoided it at every chance, yet it seems this demon stalks me.

    the tl;dr is proximity. Power travels the simplest path thus initially, I'll rely on internal resistance of the wire which powers the entire truck to aid in this.... that said, read the last paragraph for plan C.

    When you lift from welding, you get a voltage surge through the system. With a standard welder, this isn't an issue because the transformer absorbs the energy. With this system, I don't have that - the power won't flow back through the rectifier to the alternator's coils thus you have a surge in the system. As we all know, power takes the easiest way to ground. That easiest way is the EFI because it's closest to the power source.

    The proposed fix. Batteries absorb power, there is no limit to how much they'll absorb (well, until they explode but we're no where near that issue).... thus, rather then powering the entire system at the firewall and alternator (like it is now), I'm running the output from the rectifier all the way back to the batteries. Thus, if it surges, the closest absorber is the battery bank. It should mellow the surges, thus preserving the more delicate parts of the system. Key is, of course, that the charging system goes back to the battery then back forward to power the automotive systems.

    If I see troubles with this, I have a part B that goes inline between the power wire (to the front of the car) that becomes a fuse to prevent the surge from getting to the electronics. (Can't remember the name of it right now, but this is what started me down this path because the only choices to place it was at the rectifier or by rewiring how the system charges.)

    Leave a comment:


  • cstmwgn
    replied
    Originally posted by SuperBuickGuy View Post
    ...So here's the deal, I do not want the alternator having the shortest path for surges through the EFI. The 'fix' on this is put shock absorbers on the system... aka batteries. I'll run the power cable from the rectifier back to the batteries and let them absorb the surges that are part and parcel of the system design..
    I'm trying to understand (not challenging) - it seems to me that most of the aftermarket companies that sell things with circuit boards/computers want clean power. So how does the battery smooth out power surges when the wire from the alternator attaches to the + terminal at the battery while at the same time (often the same connector) the power wire for the EFI or A/C or whatever connects there as well? What keeps the surge from going back out the wire to the other components?

    Please help me understand if I have wasted a bunch of time and money bring 1/0 welding wire forward from the battery to a junction area to power everything!

    Leave a comment:


  • SuperBuickGuy
    replied
    so waiting on stuff for other stuff, so back to this stuff
    so the biggest issue at the Rubicon (beside not having welding rod) was not having 2 batteries. I designed it and ran it with 2 batteries for awhile... and now it's back...

    all the same except top posts and date (Optima Challenge gets me a great deal on batteriess)

    new/old batteries

    back to how it was built

    So here's the deal, I do not want the alternator having the shortest path for surges through the EFI. The 'fix' on this is put shock absorbers on the system... aka batteries. I'll run the power cable from the rectifier back to the batteries and let them absorb the surges that are part and parcel of the system design. While I'm at it, I'll add a battery kill switch in the system as well... though I don't think the issue will be shutting the system down through a short, rather frying everything via a surge..... ah the joys of this.

    Leave a comment:


  • SuperBuickGuy
    replied
    drove it a fair bit yesterday, my initial impression is it makes it less streetable. Before, my on-center was natural, now, it gets a degree or so 'off'..... which is interesting because the 'help' only really happens at the edges. I get get more 'help' on center with a higher-pressure pump but think I'll give it 1000 miles or so before I do any more upgrades on this. As an aside, I never needed a steering stabilizer...

    Leave a comment:


  • 65RHDEER
    replied
    Keen to hear how well this welder works.

    Leave a comment:

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