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Drying Desiccant

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  • #31
    Meanwhile, I hear if you heat the stuff up to 250-300 degrees for an adequate period of time, the moisture in it will evaporate and make it useful again. :|
    Flying south, with a flock of bird dogs.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by Beagle View Post
      Meanwhile, I hear if you heat the stuff up to 250-300 degrees for an adequate period of time, the moisture in it will evaporate and make it useful again. :|
      meanwhile, while you're surfing the Linux or fixing your Ford, ask it what temperature Silica turns to a gas.

      fetch

      Okay, I relent, I know Fords don't run and Linux is really just angry programmer's code so there's really no information there..
      a 12 page scientific paper on the properties of Silica steam. My favorite line is the first "In most nuclear cratering and cavity formation applications, the working fluid in the expanding cavity consists primarily of vaporized silica and steam"

      and I get it, my microwave makes stuff pretty hot, but not nuclear explosion/center of the sun hot. Maybe your Ford Linux one does?

      https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/4114343
      Last edited by SuperBuickGuy; June 5, 2020, 09:57 AM.
      Doing it all wrong since 1966

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      • #33
        Linux says 1.21 gigawatts. That was Diesel Geek's gig, I'm a Windows guy turned noble farmer, and I'm more interested in keeping it under it's boiling point.. I only need about 3000* F
        Flying south, with a flock of bird dogs.

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