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  • #91
    well, it was time to finally make my brake more useful
    the problem was this brake was used for stamping, and the drops ended up on top of the adjusting screws. One got into the threads and bent the shaft.... in the 30s (when this was built), the adjustment screws were whatever the machinist felt was appropriate for the brake and the project.... so either irreplaceable or expensive. Rather then buy new screws (that were already questionable in strength) I bought house jacks.... as with all things, it's been a least a year or two since I bought them - but finally a project came along where fixing the brake was no longer optional

    the jack

    so a simple task got stopped because I didn't have a socket... which I bought

    all stripped

    so the bottom part is adjustable and slides on these arms... by moving the bed up and down I can adjust have long of a stroke pushes into the metal (thus allowing me to bend at angles rather then just one setting

    I also got to test my new plasma to remove the 'good' nut

    the finished project


    I'll show how this works when I do the bed in the Buick, and it's not quite done, I need to make a way that the jacks can't move and so I can adjust them both simultaneously.. but for now, it will do what I need it to do
    65RHDEER likes this.
    Doing it all wrong since 1966

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    • #92
      If you just welded a bigger nut or something on top of it, could get it off that way, at this size wouldn't be much of a problem i believe

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      • #93
        Originally posted by Hayden011 View Post
        If you just welded a bigger nut or something on top of it, could get it off that way, at this size wouldn't be much of a problem i believe
        "On top of it" what is "it" in that sentence?

        Doing it all wrong since 1966

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        • #94
          dancing on cloud 9.
          this upgrade cost me no dollars and no cents. I had a jump shear - 37". Problem was 2 fold, first it was an 18ga shear (which really meant 20ga). Second, I had to jump on it.


          it worked for aluminum and all that, but I kept looking for a powered 48" shear. Meet my new 52" shear


          it was in a gasket factory and they only cut rubber gaskets on it. They bought a new machine and sold this for a give-away price.... it's 3 phase (I swear, next shop will have 3 phase)... but not a big deal because I can use the VFD that powers my lathe to run this as well. I plan on putting the 3 phase motor back on my brake as well because it is so much easier to reverse. Add to all of this and I can overpower the motor .... and I'm a happy camper.

          Tomorrow, I build dollies for it and the mill.
          and yes, I was pushing the limits on my tractor to move this thing
          Last edited by SuperBuickGuy; April 18, 2020, 08:48 PM.
          Doing it all wrong since 1966

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          • #95
            mostly a tool day... put wheels on my mill



            then built a dolly for the shear




            then a body dolly


            which does not work under the Corvette

            (too heavy)

            Doing it all wrong since 1966

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            • #96
              Great score on the shear. How did you find it? I've been searching for one for a long time.

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              • #97
                just gotta keep your eyes open now on Craigslist or letgo with alot of companies going under.

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                • #98
                  I really like these. (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1)

                  I have always struggled drilling accurate holes in new/custom brackets that I am building that need to bolt on using existing holes.

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                  • #99
                    I love my Miller Multimatic 220. I'm sure Miller figured that if they put a $500 tig torch and a $400 mig torch - that people would freak at the price (and they already do) I don't love the accessories - the first thing I did was put my old Tweco gun for the mig. The Tig is proprietary as well - and since I was in the first batch of people who actually bought on - I couldn't use my weldcraft torches... until today


                    the other thing is the tig torch with the machine is maybe 10'... this is 20 and soft cord..... same torch head - so bonus is my consumables all interchange...
                    Doing it all wrong since 1966

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                    • Learning to weld is probably the one thing I really want to accomplish. When my buddy retires, we are going to take some adult courses at our local university. Anyone have any advise ?

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                      • Originally posted by Monster View Post
                        Learning to weld is probably the one thing I really want to accomplish. When my buddy retires, we are going to take some adult courses at our local university. Anyone have any advise ?
                        The thing I ran into is that the Universities (trade schools) around hear teach a certified welding course. It is somewhat expensive and takes a couple years to complete. I could not find a "hobby" level welding class that would allow you to learn to weld on a more casual level.

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                        • Originally posted by Monster View Post
                          Learning to weld is probably the one thing I really want to accomplish. When my buddy retires, we are going to take some adult courses at our local university. Anyone have any advise ?
                          don't cheap out on the welding machine and only buy a cheap helmet if you have cheap eyes.
                          oletrux4evr likes this.
                          Doing it all wrong since 1966

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                          • Originally posted by Monster View Post
                            Learning to weld is probably the one thing I really want to accomplish. When my buddy retires, we are going to take some adult courses at our local university. Anyone have any advise ?
                            Only advise is get a cheap machine and a bunch of scrap metal, clean it up and practice. If you can arc, you can mig and if you can mig you will eventually get tig, Mig will handle 90% of welding, if you have a little machine, Arc will help for the heavier stuff. Tig is awesome and hardest to learn. Usually people get up to the graduation of Tig and never want to mig anymore.

                            As far as certified welding classes, big money, big responsibility. Seeing a really good welder and then a certified military job lets you understand the difference. Plus those certified guys are 25-40 bucks an hour.starting.

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                            • now all my heavy shop equipment is 3 phase again



                              so easy to run 3 phase equipment on 1 phase power and the advantages of doing it make 1 phase actually a liability.

                              I'm seriously considering putting outlets on the hydraulic pump then run my bearing press of this one's pump...
                              Last edited by SuperBuickGuy; May 4, 2020, 11:49 AM.
                              Doing it all wrong since 1966

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