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  • #16

    Re: e85 conversion

    Re: e85 conversion

    Interesting info guys.

    I run a stock galvanized steel gas tank (new repop Camaro tank) with a welded steel sump. I use Aeroquip braided hose and aluminum 1/2" hard line. My carb metering blocks are anodized, but the body and base plate are regular Holley parts.

    To date I have had NO corrosion issues, but as a safety precaution I switched it over to gasoline for winter storage and some late fall testing. I have only been running E85 for one season so perhaps it is a little early to tell.

    I have read that ethanol makes formic acid only when mixed with water in concentrations greater than 1% and that it really becomes a problem over 2% . . . perhaps this is what caused what Bill experienced?

    Since ethanol absorbs moisture out of the air at a pretty good rate, I personally choose to switch to gasoline if the car will sit for a long time.

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    • #17

      Re: e85 conversion

      Re: e85 conversion

      Ok, Thats what I was wondering. I have been running e-85 for about a year now. I have a blow-thru carb that was originally set up for gas and a gas type areomotive fuel system. I have seen no ill effects from the e-85 yet. Even in the carb where there is some totally bare aluminum. I do use a poly cell and anodized fittings because thats what I put on when I built the car. I have many friends also running e-85. On of them has a c-5 vette that has been on corn for over 3 years including being stored with a full tank for the long Minnesota winters. He also has not seen any corrosion issues anywhere.

      The University of Minnesota Mankato has done research about the corrosive nature of ethanol. They stated that there is a bell curve and it is actually most corrosive with a 20% mixture with gasoline.

      Check out these sites:

      www.rune85.com
      www.dynotuneusa.com

      They are both run by Andy Wicks. He is the one who wrote the programs for Diablosports flex-fuel programmers. He has over 1000 chevy trucks on the road with no changes but the computer program and not one report of unusual leaking or shortened component life. There are pics of a post e-85 fuel pump on there too.

      It seems to me that there is a huge amount of misinformation out the about ethanol. The fact is it is not methanol and does not need to be treated like it is. I am not saying that down the road problem will not surface. Anything is possible, e-85 has not been around long enough to know the whole story. But from what my friends and I have seen the results are very promising. Its cheap and you can make huge power with it.

      In a n\a engine though I'm not sure if it is worth the swap. If you run high comp, n2o, or a forced induction setup I'm all for it. But for the average daily driver the loss in mpg may offset the benefits.

      OK rant over ;D


      Ohh, that mustang in the video now makes 1380 to the tire on corn
      I agree, that you can run it with good discipline, but time and how much the car sits is a major factor. Also relative humidity can wreak havoc in the mix. I also agree that for most folks they won't have the motor to need it. I don't like the misinformation either, in fact I twisted a few tails here and there about it. It is a good viable fuel not a miracle, but there are some things for long term durability that need to be addressed, anodizing etc. I would like to see filters made from zeolite to dry the water out. We used to pour the "fuel" through corn grits before putting it in a tank to run an engine. Zeolite filtration will accomplish the same thing.

      Great discussion. Old meets new. ;D

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      • #18

        Re: e85 conversion

        Re: e85 conversion

        I ran it in my truck for 2 years, my tank sat 1/2 full from Sept to the next May. The only problem I encountered was 1 stuck needle under the squirter. I've seen worst on regular gasoline.
        My advice if you're serious about running E-85, set the engine up for only E-85. 12-12.5-1 compression or more depending on your cam. You'll gain in the horsepower dept. along with better fuel economy, E-85 is 105 octane, take advantage of it. If you're going to try and modifiy your own carb, buy an LM-1 meter or similar device. You will NEVER get the carb close to right without one. I ran 11.2-1 compression in my 440 and wish now I'd had at least one more point compression. Driving it "Nice" I was able to get 90% of my best gasoline mileage. Driving it like I stole it, it was considerably worst than gasoline. It made more power thoughout the rpm range on E-85 and ran cooler. Dave

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        • #19

          Re: e85 conversion

          Re: e85 conversion

          Hey Dave, What do you think for 11.5:1, 270 dur./int, 276 dur/ex .595 lift, Stage VI heads (alum.) the engine is fresh so I won't pull it apart to increase comp. for a while.
          I am intrigued by the increased hp/tq and cooler running.
          That was agood article you did! Don

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          • #20

            Re: e85 conversion

            Re: e85 conversion

            Don; I assume the cam specs you quoted are duration numbers @.050. If it were me I'd really want more compression in the motor. My junk 440 was running a tiny little mechanical with duration numbers of 239/241 with 11.2-1 compression and I could have used more. You can certainly go with E-85 in your motor but you will be leaving some power on the table. You should still see more torque throughout the rpm range. My motor ran 10-20 degrees cooler than on gasoline. Dave

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