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  • 396 small block

    What does everyone think about a 396 with a stock 350 block? (3.875 stroke x 4.040 bore) Are there any longevity issues and how weak does it make the block? What kind of cylinder heads would be best. I know that having 396 cubic inches with only a 4.04 bore that a 2.05 intake valve might be kinda puny. What do you guys think. Can it push 575 horses with the right cam, compression, and heads?

  • #2

    Re: 396 small block

    Re: 396 small block

    I know a lot of 94-96 Impala SS guys doing this with their LT1 motors. Maybe check out their sites to get info.
    BS'er formally known as Rebeldryver

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    • #3

      Re: 396 small block

      Re: 396 small block

      Some short skirted pistons, that may cause an oiling issue later on (as seen in the LT series motors). But it could be a fun motor combo ;D

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      • #4

        Re: 396 small block

        Re: 396 small block

        What would be a good head and valve size to run on a 396 small block.

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        • #5

          Re: 396 small block

          Re: 396 small block

          I use to run "Brownfield" heads and they worked really well. AFR's, Canfields, Brownfields, World products, Dart all would fill your requirements. It mainly just relies on how much $ you want to part with.

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          • #6

            Re: 396 small block

            Re: 396 small block

            What would be a good head and valve size to run on a 396 small block.
            Something 210-220cc would be my choice. AFR 210 Eliminators are the first that come to mind.

            You will have to be careful picking your parts for the bottom end. You will need a small base circle cam and a connecting rod that offers a a good profile with stroker clearance in mind. You still may have to grind a little on the rods to clear the cam, depending on what cam you go with. You may also need to hard block the bottom in the even that you hit water when grinding for oil pan rail to rod clearance.

            If you can afford it, go with a Dart block and use a 4.155 bore to make a 420" SBC. You would want to go with the next size bigger heads though -- I would say 220-230cc.

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            • #7

              Re: 396 small block

              Re: 396 small block

              I already have a 350 block and really can't afford an aftermarket block. Would I be beter off just building a 385? I was wanting the 396 just to be different but if there isn't going to be an increase in power then I will just go with the 383. The 210 Eliminator is what I've been looking at.

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              • #8

                Re: 396 small block

                Re: 396 small block

                572 would be way easier.. and more reliable and maybe even cooler...

                Hmmm

                K

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                • #9

                  Re: 396 small block

                  Re: 396 small block

                  I'm concerned about 0.040 over on that 350 block. You should have it sonic tested before boring. 0.030 is more conventional and safer. Don't know your rod/stroke ratio but that big arm will be adding more stress on the thrust surface. A 400 block (with siamese cylinders) may be a better choice although I don't like the localized heating where the cylinders join. However, there are a bazillion siamese blocks doing just fine so don't listen to me. ;)

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                  • #10

                    Re: 396 small block

                    Re: 396 small block

                    I've built a vunch of 396 small blocks , mostly for lt1 customers and they seem to do just fine. There are several shelf stock pistons out there that work for different rod lengths but you just need to double check your compression with whatever heads you run. Those afr 210 eliminators should make big power with that combo. .040 ove should be no prob as long as your block doesn't have a bunch of core shift. You can usually tell right away by looking at the front of the block. see if the hole machined for the cam is centered up in the boss that was cast there. Also look at the casting for the rod notches at the bottom of the cylinders. see if they look pretty even from side to side. you will be taking a bunch of meat from there and there is water behind it so you better be careful when clearancing.

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                    • #11

                      Re: 396 small block

                      Re: 396 small block

                      I already have a 350 block and really can't afford an aftermarket block. Would I be beter off just building a 385? I was wanting the 396 just to be different but if there isn't going to be an increase in power then I will just go with the 383. The 210 Eliminator is what I've been looking at.
                      If that is the case I would stick with a 383 style build. You would still likely need a small base circle cam and a stroker style rod, but the 383 is pretty straight forward and there are LOTS of pistons to pick from.

                      You could push it a little bit and use a 3.800" crank (like I did in my 400 block) for an extra 5-6 cubes (at 4.040 bore it would make 389"). Just use a standard 383 rod / piston combo (GM sells an inexpensive forged 3.800 stroke crank for their ZZ383). If your block has previously been zero decked the 3.800 stroke is not a good idea because the piston would be out of the hole about .025". If the block has not been decked it will be very close to zero deck without having to mill the deck (just make sure it is straight)

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