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Early mustang efi conversion

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  • Early mustang efi conversion

    I get to do some work on an early mustang for my FIL. Since it will get driven occasionally, and with the way gas is these days about evaporating and messing with old fuel systems, I was considering going efi on it. It will be set up for stock performance, it now has a 2bbl 289 and 3 speed manual trans (with the early 5 bolt bellhousing, which is different from the later 289 and 302 etc).

    I'm looking for suggestions on what to do. If I go with efi, I'd probably get an aftermarket fuel tank with the pump built in. I can spend some money on it, but not too much (a grand or so would be about the limit for the conversion).
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  • #2

    Re: Early mustang efi conversion

    Parts off a later 302 mustang? EEC-IV computer would be easy to use if it's all going to be stock, but a DIY EFI controller would be right up your alley of course!
    www.realtuners.com - catch the RealTuners Radio Podcast on Youtube, Facebook, iTunes, and anywhere else podcasts are distributed!

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    • #3

      Re: Early mustang efi conversion

      I probably need to ask around, see if any of the ford guys I know have anything useful.

      I'm also open to some type of TBI setup, that would easier to deal with the throttle linkage, air filter, etc.
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      "If it don't go, chrome it!" --Stroker McGurk

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      • #4

        Re: Early mustang efi conversion

        Last night I tuned a big Pontiac 4xx built by Butler. Originally it had an EZ-EFI on it, but it had problems starting and running good (so much for self tuning). The shop put a MS3-Pro on it, I helped dial it in, I was impressed with the throttle response and ease of tuning - this was using the FAST TBI which has 4 high impedance injectors in it. Very simple to install! If the cam is tame, the regular EZ controls will work fine, this engine was around 550-600hp and just a little too much cam for the self tuning stuff. You could do a Gm TBI or something like that, it should run fine so long as you keep away from a ton of overlap...
        www.realtuners.com - catch the RealTuners Radio Podcast on Youtube, Facebook, iTunes, and anywhere else podcasts are distributed!

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        • #5

          Re: Early mustang efi conversion

          Think "stock" engine, stock cam, etc. The GM tbi is probably the cheapest/easiest to find. Interesting idea. might require making an adapter plate, but that's probably not too difficult.

          I have the old MS 1 box, I guess it just takes a little work to make it work with the low impedance injectors.

          I can get a bolt in EFI fuel tank with sender and TBI pump for under $500.
          My fabulous web page

          "If it don't go, chrome it!" --Stroker McGurk

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          • #6

            Re: Early mustang efi conversion

            I think I need to go read Randal's T bird adventure too....
            My fabulous web page

            "If it don't go, chrome it!" --Stroker McGurk

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            • #7

              Re: Early mustang efi conversion

              The EECIII stuff would work on a Old Crown Vic its a Factory 2 barrel CFI only 2 injectors above the throttle plate. They used a crank trigger front cover and a hollow dist that just needs rotor phasing and its made to do that with a movable rotor. Stay away from the Lincoln Versailes they had the crank trigger on the flywheel
              2007 SBN/A Drag Week Winner & First only SBN/A Car in the 9's Till 2012
              First to run in the .90s .80s and .70's in SBN/A
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              • #8

                Re: Early mustang efi conversion

                if he wants a five speed, the Ford version Tremecs use the same pattern as a top loader. A stock HO TB, Upper and Lower, and 19# injectors shouldn't be all that much. They'll hold up to a "Stock" HP 289... the CV / Mustang convertible / Tbirc cougar 302 stuff with TBI was a 150 hp mill, I'm not sure how big the injectors are or what they will hold.

                If you get carried away there are porting templates for the lower to keep the HO from being such a truck manifold. The truck manifold should be even cheaper , if it will fit under the hood it might be my choice. I wouldn't spend more than 100.00 for all of it.

                The throttle linkage might be as easy as taking the cable from the truck you get the other junk from. F150 inline fuel pump is a frame mount and good for 300 hp.

                Speed density it with the MS and you can put the filter just about anywhere. Since you already have the MS, the most expensive part is done.

                Kunk Pow chinese GM cap HEI distributors are dirt cheap. I'm not sure if I'd bother with ignition control.
                Last edited by Beagle; April 14th, 2013, 07:01 AM.
                Flying south, with a flock of bird dogs.

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                • #9

                  Re: Early mustang efi conversion

                  I think I need to go read Randal's T bird adventure too....
                  I only have two issues with the TBI set up on the T-bird, one is mechanical and one electrical. The mechanical issue is the throttle arm geometry/linkage is more fubar'd than I thought and it has been the main source for some of my tuning confusion on the car. From day 1 the T-bird started 110% quicker and more reliably than with the Autolite 4300. The throttle geometry I have with a GM throttle body makes the pedal super sensitive and the issue I was having is too much throttle opening so it was like going WOT from every stop until I realize it ran smoother and better with just a whisper of a touch on the throttle. I moved the cable mounting point up, which helped a ton on the throttle control, but now it does not open more than ~50%, which is fine for normal driving. Fixing mechanical stuff is simple for you though. The other is I have a constant buzz of electrical noise in the system. I have the whole car ground strapped to high heck, I found a broken solder joint in the alternator that took care of 75% of the noise when I replaced the alternator, but there is still a remaining buzz. Unless I missed it, the MS2 software does a better job of letting the programming filter out the noise than the MS1. I "think" the remaining noise is coming from the voltage regulator in the dash that drops the dash voltage to ~5v, but that is just a theory at the moment.

                  Otherwise, with the GM TBI it starts and runs well around town and to work and back. I haven't determined if I have enough fuel pump for a serious WOT blast.
                  Escaped on a technicality.

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                  • #10

                    Re: Early mustang efi conversion

                    Thanks for the ideas. The Ford TBI system would be fine if I can find one, I guess I should hit the PnP yards in Tucson some time and see what's available. I don't really want to get into messing with computer controlled timing if I don't have to...and I think I can get away with an early Ford electronic distributor and some type of amplifier (maybe jut an HEI 4 pin module screwed on somewhere). I did an EFI swap 20+ years ago using an early ford truck injected small block, which is why I'm leery of the linkage/air cleaner issues with a port injection setup like that.

                    Thanks for the real world input Randal, at least you've shown that the GM TBI/MS system can be made to work relatively easily. I doubt the instrument voltage regulator is causing a buzz, it's a slow moving thermal device, on, off, on, off, etc.
                    My fabulous web page

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                    • #11

                      Re: Early mustang efi conversion



                      sounds like a good use of acetal or aluminum and some quality time with the bridgeport. This one looks susiciously like plywood.
                      Last edited by Beagle; April 14th, 2013, 08:49 AM.
                      Flying south, with a flock of bird dogs.

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                      • #12

                        Re: Early mustang efi conversion

                        I already have a chunk of 1/2" aluminum excess from the underwater robot projects....


                        save $100

                        http://www.jegs.com/i/Holley/510/17-...oductId=745169
                        Last edited by squirrel; April 14th, 2013, 08:53 AM.
                        My fabulous web page

                        "If it don't go, chrome it!" --Stroker McGurk

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                        • #13

                          Re: Early mustang efi conversion

                          or only save 50

                          http://www.jegs.com/i/Trans-Dapt/969/2204/10002/-1
                          My fabulous web page

                          "If it don't go, chrome it!" --Stroker McGurk

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                          • #14

                            Re: Early mustang efi conversion

                            1984-85 Mark VIIs have a complete setup that should be right up your alley. That's what I had in mind when I went looking for a TBI for the y-block on Ernie, but of course all I could find was V-6 TBI units, so that's what I got (With 130 hp at 3800 rpm fresh from the factory, you know I'm not making anywhere near that number now). I've also seen (once, so I don't know how rare it is) an 85 mustang gt convertible that had this setup too.

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                            • #15

                              Re: Early mustang efi conversion

                              Thanks for the real world input Randal, at least you've shown that the GM TBI/MS system can be made to work relatively easily. I doubt the instrument voltage regulator is causing a buzz, it's a slow moving thermal device, on, off, on, off, etc.
                              The T-bird still runs the stock distributor, has a pertronix in it.

                              The reason I suspect the dash voltage regulator is because the buzz is still there when I have the alternator disconnected and it's the only thing I can think of on the car that is electric and running outside the ignition, which is possible (also likely?) but with the pertronix I expect the ignition to be reasonably quiet like the Skylark's when I was running the HEI 4 and 7 pin modules. In any case, after the alternator replacement the buzz has been low enough to tune around and not create noticable issues.
                              Last edited by TheSilverBuick; April 14th, 2013, 05:19 PM.
                              Escaped on a technicality.

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