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Early mustang efi conversion

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  • #16

    Re: Early mustang efi conversion

    Randall,
    The Pertronix is one of the few ignitions that the FAST EZ doesnt like at all... Not sure if its a noise problem, but knowing the FAST EZ, it could be...Might be the buzz culprit.
    BKB
    www.FBthrottlebodies.com
    Bruce K Bridges

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    • #17

      Re: Early mustang efi conversion

      I bought a $500 Mustang GT 1989 - drove it into the shop - pulled the entire engine/trans/wiring/computer out of the thing in a few days.

      install the whole mess into the mustang, viola, been done hundreds of times - probably a dozen how to magazine articles on the subject
      - a man with your skills tools and equipment could complete the transplant in a few days, if you move everything over - there's very little to mess with - all you need is an EFI fuel pump and return - I've heard of some guys making the fox mustang pump assembly work in a modified stock old fuel tank - sounded like an interesting idea - but remember that the floor of the trunk on the early fords is in fact the trunk floor - so - I'm not so sure putting the top mounted fuel pump assembly in an old tank is such a great idea.

      Save that 5 bolt small block - they are getting more rare - guys with 64.5 pace cars go gaga over such things.
      Last edited by milner351; April 15th, 2013, 11:52 AM.
      There's always something new to learn.

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      • #18

        Re: Early mustang efi conversion

        Randall,
        The Pertronix is one of the few ignitions that the FAST EZ doesnt like at all... Not sure if its a noise problem, but knowing the FAST EZ, it could be...Might be the buzz culprit.
        BKB

        FAST works fine with a Pertronix if you add a 1k pullup resistor. Done that a number of times.
        www.realtuners.com - catch the RealTuners Radio Podcast on Youtube, Facebook, iTunes, and anywhere else podcasts are distributed!

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        • #19

          Re: Early mustang efi conversion

          DG,
          Sorry about the loose thread...
          I use pull ups in the Accel dual sync distributors when I cant get the FAST dual sync to fit (or I just dont like the looks of it, which is more true) but Ive never tried modifying a distributor for the FAST EZ set-up. EZ doesnt really like the unmodified tach output of most everything other than the MSD units from my experience...
          BKB
          www.FBthrottlebodies.com
          Bruce K Bridges

          Comment


          • #20

            Re: Early mustang efi conversion

            Ford tbi uses the same mounting pattern as a Holley 2bbl and only require something like 14 psi of fuel pressure. Most aftermarket carby electric pumps can make that and the summit one I used to have was internally reg'd to 14. I would snag a tb off a v8 model, and drive it with the old Megasquirt with the mod to run low impedance injectors. Upgrade the ignition to a dura spark dist and module and you are set. It won't be a rocket ship, but will probably have snappy throttle response. One other thing, I think the tbi's require a larger air filter base neck hole.

            I used to have one sitting around. If I find it I'll check it.
            Life is short. Be a do'er and not a shoulda done'er.
            1983 Mustang GT 552/C6 http://www.bangshift.com/forum/forum...485-bbr-s-83gt
            1973 F-250 460/E4OD http://www.bangshift.com/forum/forum...uck-conversion
            1986 Ford Ranger EFI 545/C6 https://bangshift.com/forum/forum/ba...tooth-and-nail

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            • #21

              Re: Early mustang efi conversion

              Found it. A standard 4bbl airfilter base hole is the same side as the raised lip, so one would need to do some trimming.
              Attached Files
              Life is short. Be a do'er and not a shoulda done'er.
              1983 Mustang GT 552/C6 http://www.bangshift.com/forum/forum...485-bbr-s-83gt
              1973 F-250 460/E4OD http://www.bangshift.com/forum/forum...uck-conversion
              1986 Ford Ranger EFI 545/C6 https://bangshift.com/forum/forum/ba...tooth-and-nail

              Comment


              • #22

                Re: Early mustang efi conversion

                That sounds good.....although I did try using a normal carb 14 psi electric fuel pump with a TBI system many years ago....didn't quite work right. I'm kind of set on using a real in tank pump, for a few stupid personal reasons.

                If you have a ford TBI that would be great.....the duraspark was definitely something I was considering using, either with the ford amplifier module or something else.
                My fabulous web page

                "If it don't go, chrome it!" --Stroker McGurk

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                • #23

                  Re: Early mustang efi conversion

                  If you want this one you can have it for a Coke and a smile. Just shoot be your mailing addy and I'll toss it in the mail. I intended to use it on a 76 Bronco I used to own, but never got that far with the project.
                  Life is short. Be a do'er and not a shoulda done'er.
                  1983 Mustang GT 552/C6 http://www.bangshift.com/forum/forum...485-bbr-s-83gt
                  1973 F-250 460/E4OD http://www.bangshift.com/forum/forum...uck-conversion
                  1986 Ford Ranger EFI 545/C6 https://bangshift.com/forum/forum/ba...tooth-and-nail

                  Comment


                  • #24

                    Re: Early mustang efi conversion

                    Thanks a bunch! Looks great!

                    pm sent
                    My fabulous web page

                    "If it don't go, chrome it!" --Stroker McGurk

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                    • #25

                      Re: Early mustang efi conversion

                      There's schematics out there on how to hook up a duraspark distributor to the HEI four pin module that could be mounted anywhere with a small heat sink on it - no need for the huge by large stock duraspark connectors and not as cheap or easy to find duraspark box.

                      Lots of guys that want to keep the stock under hood look and aren't wild about pertronix go this route.

                      Here's some info:
                      A lot of guys when converting from fuel injection to carb use the Duraspark II system. This requires pulling out the TFI distributor and coil and replacing them with the Duraspark distributor, coil, module, starter solenoid, and ballast resistor. Yeah its complicated and can get spendy but what else is there besides an even spendier aftermarket system? Well, if you don't mind a little cross breeding you can use a GM HEI ignition module. All that's required is a Duraspark distributor, HEI module, and coil. Because of the dwell control and current limiting circuits of the HEI you can use just about any coil you want, including the TFI coil, and no ballast resistor is needed.
                      If you are converting from fuel injection all you will need to buy is a Duraspark distributor, HEI module, and some wire and connectors to hook it all up. The cheapest place to get the Duraspark distributor is at a junkyard or swap meet, usually $20 or less. Duraspark distributors came on Ford cars and trucks from the mid seventies through the mid eighties. You could also get a rebuilt one at the auto parts store, generally $40 or more. Be sure you get one for the same model engine you have, many of them look very similar but are not interchangeable. On some engines, like the 302, you need to match the gear material to the camshaft you are using. Flat tappet cams use a cast gear where roller cams use a steel gear. If you look at the shank above the teeth a cast gear will be a rough cast finish where a steel gear will be a smooth machined finish. If you want a small block distributor with a cast gear tell the parts guy you want one for a 5-speed '84 Mustang GT. For a steel gear tell him you have a 5-speed '85 Mustang GT. If the guy at the parts store has two distributors listed and doesn't know which is which, the one with the cast gear is always considerably cheaper than the one with the steel gear.
                      For the module you want a GM 4-pin HEI. They came on GM vehicles from the mid seventies through the early eighties. You can buy one new at any auto parts store. Any good parts guy will know exactly what a four-pin HEI module is. Although good parts guys are hard to find so you will probably need to ask for an ignition module for a '78 Camaro with a 350. Since they are so cheap you don't need to go to the junkyard. Besides, all the junkyards around here wouldn't even sell me just the module, they wanted me to buy the whole HEI distributor to get it. The module in the picture is a Car Quest #21040 and cost me $17.77. As you can see there are four pins labeled W, G, B, and C. The G pin is a 3/16" (0.187") male quick disconnect and the rest are 1/4" (0.250") male quick disconnects. I recommend you stay away from the Parts Master module #LX-301. All the failures I have seen and heard about were due to the Parts Master module.
                      The HEI module gets pretty hot, whatever it's mounted to needs to act as a heat sink and carry heat away from it. Mount it securely to a flat metal surface away from the headers or other heat sources. There are two pins on the back of the module that you need to break off so it will sit flat. The module will come with some heat sink compound, smear it evenly over the back of the module before bolting it down. The compound aids heat transfer. You could also mount the module to a big heat sink. I bolted mine to a heat sink from a slot type computer processor. If you're a computer geek like myself then you probably have one laying around. If not then you can buy one at Radio Shack or a computer store. Again you will want to use the heat sink compound between the module and heat sink.
                      Once you have it mounted you need to wire it up. The B pin goes to the positive coil lead which gets power when the key is on, and C goes to the negative coil lead. The tach. also hooks to the negative coil lead. If you are converting from fuel injection then the coil is already wired for power (red) and tach. (green). Splice into these wires. Don't remove them from the coil just add some wires to them and run them to the module. On an older car you will need to bypass the ballast resistor so you get full power to the coil and module. The Duraspark distributor has a funky three pin connector. You can just plug into it with standard 3/16" female quick disconnects. The purple wire is run to the G pin on the module, and the orange wire is run to the W pin. Run the black wire to one of the mounting screws on the module. The black wire provides a solid ground connection for the module. The module must be grounded or it will not work properly.
                      Like I said before you can use just about any coil you want. Basically the only coils that you can't use are aftermarket coils which are for CD (capacitive discharge) ignitions only. I recommend the TFI coil, its the square looking coil used on fuel injected Fords. They are dirt cheap and work great because they were designed for the Ford TFI which is basically the same thing as the GM HEI. If the TFI and HEI modules are the same then why can't I use the TFI? The TFI distributor uses a Hall sensor instead of a magnetic pickup so the TFI module will not recognize the "analog" signal from a Duraspark distributor. However, you could hook a TFI module to breaker points since they put out a "digital" signal like the Hall sensor. No matter what coil you use you will not need a ballast resistor. The purpose of a ballast resistor is to add series resistance to limit current through the coil. The HEI actually measure the current and when it reaches a certain point resistance is added using the switching transistor to prevent excessive current draw. So basically it has a built-in self adjusting ballast resistor.
                      That's all there is to it. Whether you are converting from fuel injection or piecing together a weekend warrior the HEI is hard to beat. Its easy, cheap, and a great performer. You could spend five times more on an ignition and chances are you won't see much, if any, improvement.

                      If you have any questions or comments write me at [email protected]
                      There's always something new to learn.

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                      • #26

                        Re: Early mustang efi conversion

                        Thanks for the info. That all makes a lot of sense....
                        My fabulous web page

                        "If it don't go, chrome it!" --Stroker McGurk

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                        • #27

                          Re: Early mustang efi conversion

                          TBI is on it's way! Now about that Coke and a smile.....

                          Life is short. Be a do'er and not a shoulda done'er.
                          1983 Mustang GT 552/C6 http://www.bangshift.com/forum/forum...485-bbr-s-83gt
                          1973 F-250 460/E4OD http://www.bangshift.com/forum/forum...uck-conversion
                          1986 Ford Ranger EFI 545/C6 https://bangshift.com/forum/forum/ba...tooth-and-nail

                          Comment


                          • #28

                            Re: Early mustang efi conversion

                            Thanks! Hmmm.....when will I be in town next....maybe September?
                            My fabulous web page

                            "If it don't go, chrome it!" --Stroker McGurk

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