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The Most Amazing Automotive Metal Working Project In America Is The Recreation Of An Ill-Fated 1939 Porsche Racer In A Old North Carolina VFW Hall


The Most Amazing Automotive Metal Working Project In America Is The Recreation Of An Ill-Fated 1939 Porsche Racer In A Old North Carolina VFW Hall

There are few things that impress us more than metal craftsmanship and we have never seen, nor will we probably ever see again (in person) the level of artistry and incredible talent that we saw this spring at Copacetic Metal Shaping in China Grove, North Carolina. Due to shoddy organizational skills, I had misplaced these photos and discovered them only yesterday, wanting to puke on my shoes after realizing that I’d not published them and shown you what is one of the most beautiful handcrafted cars that I had ever seen. What you are seeing here is the hand formation of a 1939 Porsche Type 64. Don’t feel bad if that doesn’t ring a bell for you because it didn’t for me, but the story of the actual cars built in the late 1930s is fascinating.

There were three of these cars built by Porsche in the late 1930s and they were intended for use in the Berlin to Rome road race. The cars were aluminum bodied and their shape was developed after wind tunnel testing, which was a highly advanced and not often used technique on automobiles in the late 1930s. Unfortunately the three cars did not lead the most happy of lives. There is one original car known to survive and as best we can tell a man in Austria owns that one. One of the car was destroyed early on in WWII and the third car was hidden by the Porsche family but later discovered by American soldiers who chopped the roof off of it and took it joy riding before turning it in to be scrapped. It is important to note this because it means that Dave Miller and his small band of craftsmen at Copacetic were basically working off of photos and illustrations to get their shapes and dimensions correct for the car. Bruce Cook is the man who commissioned the project and he’s a land speed racer. We’ll tell you why that’s awesome in a few paragraphs down the page.

We cannot tell you how beautiful and intricate the wooden buck that the metal is being fitted to is. The buck itself it an amazing piece of work that could be housed in any museum in North America as a piece of sculpture. The buck is a vital piece of the project because it allows Miller and his guys to check the fitment of each panel as they work on it and as you will see in the photos below, it helps them see “the whole picture” in terms of the way the car is turning out for lack of a better term.

There is literally not a straight panel on the car. The doors have very subtle and gentle curves, the doghouse style roof looks as though it would be used on top of a WWII fighter plane with its narrow profile and split windshield, the rear quarter panels alone would be a life accomplishment for regular guys like us but for Miller, they are just another piece of the puzzle. The more I stared at the car in wild eyed amazement the more I tried to figure out what the most impressive part of the machine was and I just stopped and decided all of it was so freaking incredible I’d be cheating the rest by picking a “best” part.

So now you are wondering what all is going to become of this car. Well, I’m nearly welled up with joy to tell you that this car is going to be raced in the land speed realm as part of the International VW 36hp Challenge. This 36hp challenge is exactly what you think it is with competitors far and wide running cars powered by engines based off of VW 36hp components. Yes, they are allowed to hot rod them to a degree, but not a whole lot. The car will be run at ECTA events and it will appear on the salt but likely will not be raced there after completion as the whole body is going to be bare aluminum and we’re not sure that the car owner (and hardcore 36hp VW challenge racer) Bruce Cook wants to give the salt a chance to do anything to detract from the amazing creation. The mark that the boys will be shooting for once the car is done will be 130mph which is apparently the standing record set decades ago in the 36hp Challenge Unlimited class. (There are different classes within the challenge that allow different levels of engine modification, etc).

The last thing I’ll tell you about before launching into a pile of photos below is the fact that Copacetic Metal Shaping is located inside an old VFW Hall, has no real exterior markings to let anyone know that it is there and the shop has a grand total of about two tools that it uses outside of the hands of its craftsmen. The huge English wheel that appears to date from around the Civial War era and a pullmax are basically it when it comes to “technology” inside the shop. The true magic here is all through the brains and hands of what can only be described as artists. Speaking only for myself, it is staggering to think of how one’s mind could actually look at a flat piece of aluminum and then understand how to make it into the shapes you see that form this race car. It is the best thing that some humans have the ability to do and that’s the creation of something from virtually nothing. The sinuous, flowing, dead sexy shapes of this car were nothing but plywood and flat sheets of metal before the project began and now they are one of the most drop dead gorgeous creations we have ever laid eyes on.

Since these photos were taken, the car is now sitting on its wheels and chassis and is about 80-90% done. There’s a link at the bottom of the page where you can see the most updated photos from the project. THIS is 100% BangShift approved artistry!

VW Type 64 KDF 1939 Copacetic Metal Shaping Dave Miller000 VW Type 64 KDF 1939 Copacetic Metal Shaping Dave Miller001 VW Type 64 KDF 1939 Copacetic Metal Shaping Dave Miller002 VW Type 64 KDF 1939 Copacetic Metal Shaping Dave Miller003 VW Type 64 KDF 1939 Copacetic Metal Shaping Dave Miller004 VW Type 64 KDF 1939 Copacetic Metal Shaping Dave Miller005 VW Type 64 KDF 1939 Copacetic Metal Shaping Dave Miller006 VW Type 64 KDF 1939 Copacetic Metal Shaping Dave Miller007 VW Type 64 KDF 1939 Copacetic Metal Shaping Dave Miller008 VW Type 64 KDF 1939 Copacetic Metal Shaping Dave Miller009 VW Type 64 KDF 1939 Copacetic Metal Shaping Dave Miller010 VW Type 64 KDF 1939 Copacetic Metal Shaping Dave Miller011 VW Type 64 KDF 1939 Copacetic Metal Shaping Dave Miller012 VW Type 64 KDF 1939 Copacetic Metal Shaping Dave Miller013 VW Type 64 KDF 1939 Copacetic Metal Shaping Dave Miller014 VW Type 64 KDF 1939 Copacetic Metal Shaping Dave Miller015 VW Type 64 KDF 1939 Copacetic Metal Shaping Dave Miller016 VW Type 64 KDF 1939 Copacetic Metal Shaping Dave Miller017 VW Type 64 KDF 1939 Copacetic Metal Shaping Dave Miller018 VW Type 64 KDF 1939 Copacetic Metal Shaping Dave Miller019 VW Type 64 KDF 1939 Copacetic Metal Shaping Dave Miller020 VW Type 64 KDF 1939 Copacetic Metal Shaping Dave Miller021 VW Type 64 KDF 1939 Copacetic Metal Shaping Dave Miller022 VW Type 64 KDF 1939 Copacetic Metal Shaping Dave Miller023 VW Type 64 KDF 1939 Copacetic Metal Shaping Dave Miller024 VW Type 64 KDF 1939 Copacetic Metal Shaping Dave Miller025 VW Type 64 KDF 1939 Copacetic Metal Shaping Dave Miller026 VW Type 64 KDF 1939 Copacetic Metal Shaping Dave Miller027 VW Type 64 KDF 1939 Copacetic Metal Shaping Dave Miller028 VW Type 64 KDF 1939 Copacetic Metal Shaping Dave Miller029 VW Type 64 KDF 1939 Copacetic Metal Shaping Dave Miller030 VW Type 64 KDF 1939 Copacetic Metal Shaping Dave Miller031 VW Type 64 KDF 1939 Copacetic Metal Shaping Dave Miller032 VW Type 64 KDF 1939 Copacetic Metal Shaping Dave Miller033 VW Type 64 KDF 1939 Copacetic Metal Shaping Dave Miller034 VW Type 64 KDF 1939 Copacetic Metal Shaping Dave Miller035 VW Type 64 KDF 1939 Copacetic Metal Shaping Dave Miller036 VW Type 64 KDF 1939 Copacetic Metal Shaping Dave Miller037 VW Type 64 KDF 1939 Copacetic Metal Shaping Dave Miller038 VW Type 64 KDF 1939 Copacetic Metal Shaping Dave Miller039 VW Type 64 KDF 1939 Copacetic Metal Shaping Dave Miller040 VW Type 64 KDF 1939 Copacetic Metal Shaping Dave Miller041 VW Type 64 KDF 1939 Copacetic Metal Shaping Dave Miller042 VW Type 64 KDF 1939 Copacetic Metal Shaping Dave Miller043

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CLICK HERE to see the latest photos of this amazing car

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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10 thoughts on “The Most Amazing Automotive Metal Working Project In America Is The Recreation Of An Ill-Fated 1939 Porsche Racer In A Old North Carolina VFW Hall

  1. GuitarSlinger

    The original car is absolutely amazing . The metal working and craftsmanship these guys are displaying in the recreation of the car is stunning .

    For the record though the car was labeled as a VW Type 60K10 … not a Porsche [ Porsche as a car manufacture did not exist in 1939 ” Porsche ; Origin of the Species ” ] All three original cars seeing a fair amount of road use … including Porsche himself using one as a daily driver though never used as race cars due to the outbreak of WWII . One still existing . One presumed to be in parts somewhere [ conquering GI’s whacked the roof off etc ] And one not accounted for

    But errr …. Tech Department …. there’s about a six inch gap of whiteness between the last photo and ‘ Leave a Reply ‘ … not complaining …. just saying

    1. KentT64

      Porsche as a design company was formed in 1930 and designed and developed the KDF Typ 60K10. 60 was the Porsche design folder number for all of the KDF/VW design and development. 60K10 indicates VW/KDF Body (K is for Karroserrie) number 10. They also had their own design folder number 64 for this car as a Porsche design. The surviving “Berlin Rome Coupe” was put on public display at the Innsbruck, Austria Hofgarten race on July 1, 1948 with letters spelling Porsche on the front. It was the first car to ever have the Porsche name applied that way. It was described as the first Porsche Production car and the Porsche 356 Roadster #1 was also displayed and raced that day.

  2. Eric Yost

    I was wondering why you haven’t posted this up yet but you lost the pics makes sence lol this thing is truly amazing in person

  3. Chris Anderson

    Living in China Grove, I go right by this place on my Saturday morning trips to Hardee’s for breakfast. I never had any idea there was car stuff inside. Man,these guys are unbelievably talented. Ironic though that a building that used to be a VFW has cars in it being worked on from Germany & Japan! Since I’ve moved here 5 years ago, I’m constantly amazed at how many car enthusiasts live in this mainly rural area. On nice weekends, the road out in front of my house looks like a rolling car show……

  4. MeeLee

    I wonder why they never created a clay model first, baked it, and created molds to make polyester housing?
    Polyester mixes with glass wool (fiberglass) or carbon fiber is lighter than aluminum, and have a steel cage?
    36hp is not a lot. Even with a car like that, itll be hard to get more than 95mph, it is simply THAT underpowered, unless you add a turbo, intercooler, or tweak compression for racing with premium fuels..

    1. Mont

      You act like you know about land speed racing, but the words you type out prove you know nothing about it. In land speed racing horsepower, traction, and aerodynamics are the only things that matter. More weight is an advantage, because it increases traction. Maybe read a book or something.

      1. ProDigit

        Maybe you learn how to read first. Poly body with sreel frame is heavy weight. 36hp is not enough power to be worrying about traction. Wind resistance provides enough downpull.You actually twant lighter body, as it provides faster acceleration.perhaps you need to learn to do pipi in the toilet before you post here!

  5. KentT64

    Dave Miller and his crew have done some terrific fabrication on Bruce Cook’s 36 HP challenge car. Can someone provide me a description or images of the chassis and interior.

    The surviving T64 is owned by the Arabella Group in Munich. PROTOTYP Museum in Hamburg has replicated the T64 using chassis parts from the two cars that do not survive. Porsche has a T64 “sculpture” in their museum. The general shape of the Cook car is more like the Porsche Typ 114 than the T64.

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