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0 to 5 v from o2...and a stray injector

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  • Barry Donovan
    started a topic 0 to 5 v from o2...and a stray injector

    0 to 5 v from o2...and a stray injector

    I want a primitive mounted stray injector ...

    I have only moved enough babbling nerd out of the way to find a volts to pwm controller was needed..
    and cannot find that on my little kids internet.(Thank you "daddy" for keeping me from fuel injection. Big scary fuel injection.)

    it took me 5 years to find "full wave diode" and the 50 cents to make it work....solved a long running feedback with volts near intake tube (a boxer is a crazy engine)

    anyway, I have an extra $2.95...want an injector running off the 0 to 5 volt from the innovate gauge.

    power transistor, possibly a resistor...volts to pwm.

    any ideas?

    cheap primitive sloppy..and tiny injector. the carb does most of the work.

  • Barry Donovan
    replied
    Ok, I just re-read your previous posts and I think I finally understand what you're trying to do.

    My first post will let you drive an extra injector based on the 0-5v signal you have from the wideband.

    I think your other suggestion was to instead drive the fuel pump harder in response to the 0-5v signal. I think you're talking about rectifiers in your last post, but that doesn't make sense. Rectifiers convert alternating current to direct current. Where would you be getting alternating current from in your car?

    The boost converter you linked to from eBay converts the input voltage to a higher output voltage. That means you would be driving your fuel pump with a signal line from your wideband. Unless the output of the wideband is designed to source a bunch of current (which it likely isn't), you'll either have a fuel pump that doesn't work, or a wideband that lets the smoke out.

    The PWM circuit I linked could allow you to vary the voltage the pump sees by having the output transistor switch the pump instead of an injector. You would probably have to trim the 555 circuit to provide a DC between, say, 65% and 100% (12v*0.65 = 7.8v) in response to an input sweep of 0-5v. I haven't worked with 555 timers enough to tell you if that's a simple operation, but I'm sure it's possible.
    it would be a smart thing to learn. I'll browse around.
    dropping to 7.8 is easy, I have a resistor from my pc some guy invented just for the fans. I even made a cooler for one.
    the thing that gets me is the 1987 car I am speaking of has a 7v drop down on a timer without a clock to calm the pump...series of resistors. the problem is the carb is much bigger, float bowl, overall fuel pressure needed...timers off seconds after turning key on. like aprime mode only. I had to bypass it. Now that the fuel pump is bigger, even with a cushion, the hard chassis knows its there. Noisy.

    I thought it would be cool to variable the pump similar, but way more precise.

    I'll learn more of that chip/pcb, seems alot can be done with it.

    thanks for reply.

    three 5k resistors made the name of the controller... just learning now.
    Last edited by Barry Donovan; February 17th, 2013, 07:14 PM.

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  • Karl Buchka
    replied
    Ok, I just re-read your previous posts and I think I finally understand what you're trying to do.

    My first post will let you drive an extra injector based on the 0-5v signal you have from the wideband.

    I think your other suggestion was to instead drive the fuel pump harder in response to the 0-5v signal. I think you're talking about rectifiers in your last post, but that doesn't make sense. Rectifiers convert alternating current to direct current. Where would you be getting alternating current from in your car?

    The boost converter you linked to from eBay converts the input voltage to a higher output voltage. That means you would be driving your fuel pump with a signal line from your wideband. Unless the output of the wideband is designed to source a bunch of current (which it likely isn't), you'll either have a fuel pump that doesn't work, or a wideband that lets the smoke out.

    The PWM circuit I linked could allow you to vary the voltage the pump sees by having the output transistor switch the pump instead of an injector. You would probably have to trim the 555 circuit to provide a DC between, say, 65% and 100% (12v*0.65 = 7.8v) in response to an input sweep of 0-5v. I haven't worked with 555 timers enough to tell you if that's a simple operation, but I'm sure it's possible.

    Leave a comment:


  • Barry Donovan
    replied
    Your stream of consciousness posts are fascinating, but I gotta tell you... I have no idea what you're saying right now.

    Sorry.
    no biggie, you appear to be form another country.


    50 cents:
    a full wave diode, heatsink, and a little box

    1 bank of full wave diode compromised to ten volt (needing twelve- but ten will work, maybe even 7), the other bank the zero to 5 coming from innovate gauge.

    in out done. no circles of theory..no adding 300 more watts for the 5 watts needed.

    I want to regulate my fuel pump, and it can't vary too far anyway.

    I experimented with the fullwave already.."huge" difference to half wave a diode...to the full wave. Almost like a two phase volt doubler. All I want is a subtle change..whatever works.

    so, the last question..can a 5 volt bank be part of a ten volt hookup on a fullwave diode? it is still adding amps. I wonder what it would balance to. how much heatsink...?


    if it even works.
    Last edited by Barry Donovan; February 17th, 2013, 05:26 PM.

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  • Karl Buchka
    replied
    Your stream of consciousness posts are fascinating, but I gotta tell you... I have no idea what you're saying right now.

    Sorry.

    Leave a comment:


  • Barry Donovan
    replied
    You've got more than enough budget to do this with discrete components.

    Check out the top of page 13 in this 555 app note: http://www.datasheetcatalog.org/data...ents/ne555.pdf

    That's your basic voltage to pwm duty converter, but it requires a clock input. That can easily be done with another 555 running as an astable multivibrator. Buy yourself a 556 timer, which is two 555 timers in one chip, and you'll be all set.
    interesting stuff. the more i look the more I see slob of overlapping stuff. who let the cat running in circles in?

    maybe a "b3m" chip will come out of the globs of solder instead.


    Not to offend anyone with a life long career of this...I know it went as silly like protecting the c language with a language with a language with a langauge....no need of it, but did it anyway.

    can't even get a broken bone fixed normally today...
    Last edited by Barry Donovan; February 17th, 2013, 03:31 PM.

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  • Karl Buchka
    replied
    You've got more than enough budget to do this with discrete components.

    Check out the top of page 13 in this 555 app note: http://www.datasheetcatalog.org/data...ents/ne555.pdf

    That's your basic voltage to pwm duty converter, but it requires a clock input. That can easily be done with another 555 running as an astable multivibrator. Buy yourself a 556 timer, which is two 555 timers in one chip, and you'll be all set.
    Last edited by Karl Buchka; February 17th, 2013, 03:12 PM.

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  • Barry Donovan
    replied
    yep.
    I found something had to transfer the power realm to another.

    the 0 to 5 to a 7 to 12 could get fuel pump...using the 0 to 5 as the control.

    I have little heatsinks, a voltage regulator that responds to a voltage regulator (I don't even know what to call it). I'll think of something.

    found a step-up controller on ebay.

    5v gives 12..anything less can slow the pump. I'll hear it shut off around 6.

    cheap enough...60 cents beyond my $2.95 budget, but I'll try to manage.
    Last edited by Barry Donovan; February 17th, 2013, 10:07 AM.

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  • Beagle
    replied
    look into a PWM controller for a computer fan ?

    http://www.instructables.com/id/PWM-Fan-Controller/

    Leave a comment:


  • Barry Donovan
    replied
    If I'm following what you are saying... which is doubtful.

    You want to make an injector spray based off of the output of a wideband? Well you will have to have it really work off of turning on at half scale (~2.5V) and ramp from 0-100% duty cycle based on the voltage.

    Why on earth are you wanting to do this? Are you fighting lean spots in your fuel curve or are you running out of carb?

    awaiting the sterile jet change. maine winter takes forver. lean spot it is.

    today I heard the carb scream and o2 scream in the same sentence. I did not know o2 could scream. Maybe it is synching something. I know the jet and needle were never paired, its as if their concept of powered valve needs to electroplate main jet and needle together first...and that is a gem once it gets it. maine weather is nothing at all then. I pick the darndest time to be ripping into the carb. Summer does this quick, good long ride.

    0 to 5 ramp, basic pulse of a squirt...that is all I am after. no rocket science, no mapping every 10 rpm.

    the fancy maps and babble still have not come close to winning me over. just on or off. Squirt done.

    22 inches of vacuum... injection and pulsing is shredded before the "precise brain" even catches it.
    I'll just stay patient. Burping the idle to partial circuit after jet change...needs a bigger carb hat for a buffer...and I need to wait for that to put together the pieces..

    still at 30mpg. no serious complaints..

    that 0 to 5 v circuit riding o2 really has my imagination.
    Last edited by Barry Donovan; February 16th, 2013, 08:18 PM.

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  • CTX-SLPR
    replied
    If I'm following what you are saying... which is doubtful.

    You want to make an injector spray based off of the output of a wideband? Well you will have to have it really work off of turning on at half scale (~2.5V) and ramp from 0-100% duty cycle based on the voltage.

    Why on earth are you wanting to do this? Are you fighting lean spots in your fuel curve or are you running out of carb?

    Leave a comment:

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