What Is A Rear Driveshaft Enclosure, And Why Do I Need One? Tim McAmis Explains How It Works, Why, And How They Build Their’s.


What Is A Rear Driveshaft Enclosure, And Why Do I Need One? Tim McAmis Explains How It Works, Why, And How They Build Their’s.

We love Tim McAmis. Not just because he and his company build bad ass chassis for Pro Mod cars, but also because of the videos that he puts up explaining all kinds of great technical aspects of race car building. Plus, he highlights the parts and pieces they have that make the car faster, safer, or better in general and we dig that stuff. But there is also the “Tim factor”. LOL I don’t know what else to call it. Tim has a mouth on him, is a riot to listen to, and doesn’t pull any punches. So a lot of times his opinion of something is just as front and center as the technical part of his video. It’s one of his finest traits, as long as you aren’t on the receiving end of one of his rants. What makes this all extra fun is that when you watch a technical video, with no real drama or controversy, he still entertains with his colorful language and funny one liners.

If you have never watched one of his videos, then consider yourself warned because he will be swearing in this one.

Oh, and this video is really good at explaining driveshaft loops and the rear enclosures required in Pro Mod and advanced ET rides at this level. You could really do well to pay attention and listen because some of these things could be put to use in your own project even if it isn’t this quick.

Watch and enjoy!


  • Share This
  • Pinterest
  • 0

8 thoughts on “What Is A Rear Driveshaft Enclosure, And Why Do I Need One? Tim McAmis Explains How It Works, Why, And How They Build Their’s.

  1. Piston Pete

    Tim’s stuff is way beyond anything I would ever need, but I like to learn everything I can about mondo doorslammers and his videos always provide great insight that anyone can appreciate.

    Reply
  2. Typhoon TV

    TMRC’s extreme duty Drive Shaft Enclosure creates a double layer of containment with its floating tunnel design. Unlike basic designs where the enclosure is welded to a drive shaft loop(s), this system allows the enclosure tube to take the initial impact of a driveline failure and often retains a drive shaft without causing damage to the outer loop(s). Repair or replacement of the enclosure tube is much easier and less expensive than replacing an entire unit that is welded to its outer loop(s).

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

 


 

 

Get The Bangshift Newsletter