The Monday Shift: Here’s The Best Twin Stick Big Rig Video We Have Ever Seen – Explanation and Operation


The Monday Shift: Here’s The Best Twin Stick Big Rig Video We Have Ever Seen – Explanation and Operation

Over the years we have showed you a multitude of videos featuring truckers running twin-stick big rigs down the road. Some of them have been funny, some of them painful, but none of them have been really super informative as far as how the boxes were operating and why. Well, that all changes today with this video that we found. You are going to get a great education as to why old trucks often had twin sticks, the different setups available, and most importantly, how you operate them in the real world. This is not a guy putting on a circus show of reaching through the wheel and stuff. This is a pro in a cool rig giving us the rundown. Oh, and about that rig.

The truck that we get this lesson in is a bad ass. How about a 1978 Peterbilt 379 with a 475hp Silver 8V92 Detroit diesel, two Spicer Transmissions in a 6 +4 configuration and both packing overdrive, 5.33 gears in the rear axles, and over one million miles on the odometer. She’s a big, well broken in draft horse that serves as the best testbed we could imagine for this video.

The first couple minutes are the dude explaining the mechanical end of things and the driving end. One of the things that serves as a great reminder about what makes great truck drivers great is his understanding of the RPM drop between gears and splits. It is also interesting to learn about how come gear configurations are faster than others, in a counter-intuitive fashion.

Press play below to get the full rundown on how to properly run a twin stick rig!


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2 thoughts on “The Monday Shift: Here’s The Best Twin Stick Big Rig Video We Have Ever Seen – Explanation and Operation

  1. Dave Gray

    The first time that I drove a Diamond Reo with a Spicer SST-1
    I Ignored the shift patter on the plate. I soon learned to follow
    The weird uncommon pattern on the plate.
    Dave

    Reply

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