Hell On Parts: This Bugatti Brake Testing Video Is 1,800-Degrees Of Gnarly


Hell On Parts: This Bugatti Brake Testing Video Is 1,800-Degrees Of Gnarly

Yeah, you are looking at a brake rotor that is carry about 2,000-degrees of temperature in the middle of a brake testing regimen that would make even the most brutally harsh engineer cringe. The work was being done for good reason, though. The team at Bugatti was developing their Chiron hyper car and they decided to really go wild on the brake calipers. How so? They are printed titanium. Not billet, not cast, not forged…printed. They were (maybe still are) the largest printed, stressed, and working automobile part in the world and they are likely just the tip of the iceberg as far as that technology goes.

So how do you test your fancy pants new caliper? You work its ass off in repressive conditions. The testing rig spins the rotor up to speed repeatedly and then the brakes clamp down generating monster heat and friction. The first couple of stops seems tame but as the speeds rise and as the aggressiveness of the braking action rises, you start to see metal turning colors that it normally does not.

Thought it all, though the rotor does its job and seems to pass the test with flying colors. There’s a dramatic build up at the begining and then the testing is kind of awesome and then the inspection at the end is great because it clearly shows where the heat was finding its way into the caliper. There’s plenty of bluish metal in that caliper, illustrating just how hot it was getting after repeated stops.

The great irony in all of this is that the cars areas valuable and the owners mostly so lacking in competence, they rarely see more than highway speed…if they see the highway at all. That being said, we know one would stop pretty well after seeing this!

Watch this video of a brutal Bugatti brake test right here –


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One thought on “Hell On Parts: This Bugatti Brake Testing Video Is 1,800-Degrees Of Gnarly

  1. old guy

    No idea what blue and straw colors mean on Ti printed parts …….
    never heat treated / hardened Ti by color – if it’s possible..

    Reply

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