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This Time Lapse Video Of The Removal, Tear Down, Machine Work, And Rebuilding Of A Buick Nailhead Is Awesome.


This Time Lapse Video Of The Removal, Tear Down, Machine Work, And Rebuilding Of A Buick Nailhead Is Awesome.

I’m a huge fan of GM engines, specifically those from Chevrolet, but I’m also a big fan of Cadillac and Pontiac powerplants. I’m not however a fan of GM’s Buick Nailhead engine. Judge me however you like, I have built them before and quite frankly they suck in so many ways. Visually they are an awesome piece, especially in something they originally came in or something period correct. However, their valvetrain and cylinder heads make them far from good at creating real power by today standards. But none of that matters to enjoy this video. In fact I think I actually like this video more because I don’t like them. This engine turns out beautiful.

Or shall I say these “engines” since the first one is JUNK and can’t be reasonably rebuilt. The second one is pretty damn nice though, so check this out and tell me what you think. I think the folks making this video did an amazing job. Watch the tools and watch the tape removal off the engine. Both are pretty awesome and demonstrate just how much work it takes to do something like this. I dig it.

Watch and let us know what you think.


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2 thoughts on “This Time Lapse Video Of The Removal, Tear Down, Machine Work, And Rebuilding Of A Buick Nailhead Is Awesome.

  1. Rock On

    I like all of the big cubic inch GM engines. Oldsmobile, Pontiac and Buick 455’s. Chevrolet 454. Cadillac 472 and 500. With the Buick nailhead torque is your best friend. I would only look at the 425 with 445 lb.ft. of torque. This is one pretty engine. It should really be in a hot rod coupe with no hood for the world to admire.

    Reply
  2. HotRodPop

    Didn’t know these things had adjustable pushrods, learn something new everyday. I disagree/agree Chad. Not a lot of HP to be had, but these motors were known for the tremendous torque they produced, which is what made those beautiful old barges move out. I agree with Rock On… if it ain’t going in a restoration, it needs to go in a rod and be out there for the world to see. Very satisfying video!

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